Currently viewing the category: "Parasitic Hymenopterans"
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Subject: What is this?
Location: Orange, nsw, Australia
February 20, 2014 4:25 am
Hi bug man, this flew into our house, i have never seen anything like it, could you please tell me what it is.
Signature: Tara

Crane Fly

Ichneumon

Hi Tara,
We believe this is a Crane Fly in the family Tipulidae.  There are some images on the Brisbane Insect site that look similar.

Correction
Subject: “Tipulidae” from Australia
February 22, 2014 11:52 am
Hi,
on Feb. Feb.20, 2014 “Tara” posted an isect from New South Wales, Australia.  You answered that this might be a crane fly / Tipulidae, but if you look at the wing venation it is evident that this insect does not belong to the Diptera at all, it’s Hymenoptera. It’ another parasitic Hymenoptera, Ichneumonidae or Braconidae. You may compare the wing venation of a Tipulidae here: http://www.metafysica.nl/nature/insect/hennig1954_7.jpg
Kind regards Erwin
Signature: Erwin Beyer

Thanks Erwin.  Because of an earlier comment, we have already addressed this error, and we will add your comment to the posting.

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Subject: found this on m kitchen table
Location: Southern California
February 20, 2014 8:41 pm
my son was eating lunch when I noticed this little beauty on my table! It is about 1 inch long, tip of antenna to end of abdomen. Six legs, two sets of wings. So beautiful! I have never seen these in my area before!
Signature: BB

Ichneumon

Ichneumon

Hi BB,
This parasitic Ichneumon Wasp is in the subfamily Ophioninae and you may read more about them on BugGuide.  This is one group that is frequently attracted to lights, and though we generally inform our readers that Ichneumons are harmless, we learned several years ago that this group is known to sting.  According to BugGuide:  “Females have a very compressed abdomen and a short, very sharp ovipositor. The ovipositor can penetrate the human skin; most other ichneumons can’t ‘sting’.”

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Subject: Fairy Fly
Location: Orlando, FL
February 7, 2014 6:24 pm
Hi Bugman,
I found this cool little Fairy Fly while going through a trap sample today at work, and I took the opportunity to take a size comparison photo with a grain of sand. I noticed that there aren’t many Fairy Fly photos up on What’s That Bug, so I thought I’d submit the little guy.
Signature: Brian

Fairy Fly

Fairy Fly

Hi Brian,
Thanks so much for sending us your photo of a Fairy Fly, the common name for a Parasitic Hymenopteran in the family Mymaridae which are classified with the Chalcid Wasps.  As you indicated, we only have a single, very old image of a Fairy Fly in our archives.
  According to BugGuide, Fairy Flies parasitize the eggs of other insects and they are:  “Fairly characteristic in habitus and do not closely resemble any other chalcidoids. The most easily observable characters are(2):
stalked, narrowly elongate hindwing
long clubbed female antennae (filiform in males)
greatly reduced venation which terminates within the first third of the wing (except in Arescon and Krokella)
no discernible stigmal or postmarginal vein
tarsi may be 4- or 5-segmented
antennal toruli widely separated
vertex surrounded by thickened bands of cuticle and separated from the face by a suture.”
While we don’t fully understand all of that, we are providing the information for our readers.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: My new roommates!
Location: St. Thomas, USVI
January 30, 2014 6:53 pm
Hi bugman,
As I’ve been traveling around the US for the past year, I’ve been able to identify quite a lot of my “new roommates” through your great web resource here. (Thanks!) It’s been a fun and comforting challenge to observe, document, and identify each diverse creature that I’ve come across. Currently, I’m in the Virgin Islands (so, although it is winter season, the temperatures still range from about 74-84 degrees right now). This little guy appears to be a thread-waisted wasp to me, but just wanted to seek your expert opinion.
I’m new to the area, but I’ve seen a few of them in my apartment over the past couple days, and I definitely didn’t think it was a wasp at first just because they are a much smaller size than I usually associate with wasps. I also have quite a funny group of case-bearing cloth larva living here as well, and I see the signs of termites here, but have yet to spot any individual termites. So, there are lots of friends! :)
Signature: Rachel

Ensign Wasp

Ensign Wasp

Hi Rachel,
This Ensign Wasp really is your friend.  The female Ensign Wasp lays her eggs on the ootheca or egg case of a Cockroach, and the larval wasp eats the eggs and developing nymphs of the Cockroach, helping to control the Cockroach populations in homes.  The abdomen of the Ensign Wasp bobs up and down as it moves about, much like the action of signalling with a flag, hence the common name.

Daniel, thank you! Very nice news to hear about the ensign wasp helping to control the cockroach population. I appreciate your help in identifying it! :) Have a great February!
Rachel

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Subject: White Flank Orange Braconid Wasp
Location: Millicent South Australia
January 13, 2014 11:48 pm
Quite common in this area along dirt roads.
A friend’s daughter crash her car thinking the insect would sting her.
Signature: Ken de Low

Braconid Wasp

Braconid Wasp

Hi Ken,
We agree that this is a Braconid Wasp, but it is not the same as the White Flank Orange Braconid,
Callibracon species, that is pictured on the Brisbane Insect Website.  There are many Australian Braconids with this same general color pattern.  We are sorry to hear about your friend’s daughter’s car crash, but it wouldn’t be the first time the irrational fear of an insect in the car has caused an accident.

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Subject: Theiron morio
Location: USA, Tarpon Springs, FL
January 8, 2014 1:56 pm
Greetings.
This seems to match a photo of Therion morio.
Thoughts?
many thanks
Signature: James

Ichneumon:  Therion morio

Ichneumon: Therion morio

Hi James,
You are correct.  This magnificent Ichneumon is
Therion morio.  According to BugGuide, the female parasitizes moth caterpillars, including the Fall Webworm.

Ichenumon:  Therion morio

Ichenumon: Therion morio

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination