Currently viewing the category: "Parasitic Hymenopterans"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is it
Location: Minnesota
July 4, 2014 11:50 am
We saw this bug on our dying oak tree. He and his friends remind me of a scorpion but we live in Minnesota.
Signature: P.Pratt

Stump Stabber

Stump Stabber

Dear P.Pratt,
This is a magnificent image of a female
Megarhyssa atrata, commonly called a Stump Stabber.  The female Stump Stabber uses her lengthy ovipositor to place her eggs deep beneath the surface of dead and dying trees that are infested with the larvae of Pigeon Horntails and other Wood Wasps.  The larvae of the Stump Stabbers hatch and feed upon the larvae of the Wood Wasps.  They are considered parasitoids that parasitize and eventually kill the host insect.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Huge Bug on Mirror
Location: Vancouver, BC.
July 1, 2014 5:06 pm
Hi Bugman,
I’m trying to figure out what this is- it was in my friend’s house today and its HUGE! It looks like its some sort of Mantis or something- Any ideas?
Signature: Jonathan

Ichneumon startles residents

Ichneumon startles residents

Hi Jonathan,
The look on your face is quite startled.  This is some species of Ichneumon, a family of Parasitoid Wasps that are not aggressive, though we have occasionally gotten reports from folks who have been stung.  Female Ichneumons lay eggs on or near specific insect or arthropod hosts and the larval Ichneumon feeds on the host insect, eventually killing it.  We are unable to determine the species of Ichneumon that entered your friend’s home.  According to BugGuide, the family Ichneumonidae:  “About 5,000 described species in North America, possibly 3,000 more undescribed; arguably, the largest animal family, with the estimated 60,000 species worldwide (up to 100,000, according to some estimates).”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Ichneumon in Pacific Northwest
Location: Lacey, Washington (Southwestern Washington )
June 30, 2014 6:33 pm
Hello,
I used whatsthatbug.com to identify some new visitors to my front yard. After finding in your 2008 archives what appears to be the same wasp as I have, I would like to share some photos with you to share if you wish.
Signature: Lisa

Unidentified Ichneumon

Unidentified Ichneumon

Dear Lisa,
Thank you for sending additional images of this still unidentified Ichneumon from the Pacific Northwest.

Unidentified Ichneumon

Unidentified Ichneumon

Unidentified Ichneumon

Unidentified Ichneumon

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: wasp?
Location: Anchorage
June 29, 2014 4:45 pm
This appears to be a wood wasp…. bit the extra long stinger? Wood bore tool? Should I be looking fora nest? Dangerous to me or my dogs?
Signature: cautiously fascinated in Alaska

Giant Ichneumon or Stump Stabber

Giant Ichneumon or Stump Stabber

Dear cautiously fascinated in Alaska,
This is a Giant Ichneumon or Stump Stabber in the genus
Megarhyssa, not a Wood Wasp, however, the female Stump Stabber does use her lengthy ovipositor to lay eggs beneath the surface of wood that has been infested with the boring larvae of Wood Wasps, the only food upon which the developing larva of the Giant Ichneumon will feed.  They do not build nests as they are solitary parasitoids and they do not pose a danger to you or your dogs, though we admit that any ovipositor that can penetrate wood might be able to penetrate human skin, however, these Giant Ichneumons are not aggressive toward humans. 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: flying bug
Location: Winnipeg, Manitoba Canada
June 27, 2014 10:47 am
In our backyard we seen a flying bug with something green coming from its tail? The green was circular in shape.
Signature: Len

Stump Stabber laying eggs

Stump Stabber laying eggs

Hi Len,
This is a female Stump Stabber or Giant Ichneumon,
Megarhyssa atrata, and the eggs she lays will hatch into larvae that will feed upon and parasitize the larvae of Wood Wasps that are feeding beneath the surface.  Has you checked out our featured postings, you would have seen that the Stump Stabber is our Bug of the Month for July 2014.  The green membrane is part of the structure of the long ovipositor which allows the Stump Stabber to lay her eggs well below the surface of the bark.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Wasp ?
Location: Victoria BC Canada
June 26, 2014 10:13 pm
I have a group of these flying around one section of my property. They look like wasps, but are much thinner and longer. They hover low to the ground, seeming to fly in circles, and dont seem to be going to a ‘ nest ‘ that I can see. They also do not seem to be aggressive like the other pesky wasps…yet. They have been hovering in the same area now for just about a week
Are these a threat to my Pets, and what are the advantages / disadvantages to them and how do I get rid of them.
Thanks
Signature: Randie Ruckle

Ichneumon

Ichneumon

Dear Randie,
In 2008, we posted some images that were identified as Ichneumons, members of a family of wasps that parasitize other insects and sometimes other arthropods, but as it is a very large family, we never drilled down to the species level.  Recently there has been a flurry of comments from the Pacific Northwest to that posting including reports of stings or bites, and since you have provided us with new images, we have decided to see if we are able to properly identify this Ichneumon and provide any relevant information.
  This may take some time, but we will work on it.  Your Ichneumons seem to resemble members of the tribe Ichneumonini based on BugGuide images, but they might be in a different tribe.  BugGuide states:  “About 5,000 described species in North America, possibly 3,000 more undescribed; arguably, the largest animal family, with the estimated 60,000 species worldwide (up to 100,000, according to some estimates,” and they do have an extensive archive of Ichneumons.   Pouring through it will take some time.  If the information we have provided leads you to an identification before we get back to you, please give us an update.

Ichneumon

Ichneumon

Update:  We did locate a matching image on Island Nature devoted to Vancouver Island, but it is not identified.

Thanks so much for the info.
I think my concern is there are alot of them in that section. I would say about 50 at least, all hovering ( flying )  just about ground level. From what I have read in Wiki, they ae supposed to be solitary.  There does not seem to be a ” nest ” that I can see them going to. The area is about 10 x 20 feet, give or take, that they are congregating in.  I dont really want a group of stinging insects around with my 2 19 year old dogs and my indoor/outdoor cat.
Thanks again. Any info is great !
R

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination