Currently viewing the category: "Parasitic Hymenopterans"
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Subject: what kind of bug is this
Location: columbus ohio
December 26, 2013 5:47 pm
Hi,
Found this bug in my house, 12/26 in ohio…its freezing outside haven’t seen any sig of bug life so to find one inside puzzled me! What type of bug is this? Should I be concerned that there are more? It looks fire antish- I grew up in the south that was my first guess, never seen/noticed anything like it before in OH.
Thanks for any feedback!
Signature: M

Flightless Ichneumon

Flightless Ichneumon

Dear M,
We believe this is a flightless Ichneumon in the genus
Gelis.  Ichneumons are parasitic wasps that prey on a variety of insects and arthropods, though many Ichneumons are host specific.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What kind of wasp is this?
Location: Adelaide, South Australia
December 16, 2013 8:28 pm
Hello,
I found this in our backyard and was wondering exactly what it is and is it dangerous. We live in Adelaide, South Australia. Thanks.
Signature: Jacob

Ichneumon

Ichneumon

Hi Jacob,
This is some species of Ichneumon, a large and diverse group of parasitoid wasps that are not considered dangerous to humans.  The female uses her ovipositor, which is visible in your photo, to deposit her eggs, often directly into the body of the host insect or arthropod.  Most Ichneumons are very host specific, and the prey include many different orders, including butterflies and moths, true bugs and other wasps.  We hope to eventually determine a species identification for this unusual Ichneumon.

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Subject: student need help
Location: sudan africa
December 4, 2013 2:10 pm
This wasp was found inside eggs of buprestidae beetlr
Signature: ms. mawada saad

Parasitic Wasps

Parasitic Wasps

Dear Ms. Mawada Saad,
If they were found in Buprestid eggs, they must be very tiny.  These are many parasitic wasps and the taxonomy of North American species it not very well organized or understood.  We suspect there must be even less documentation on species from Sudan.  We are providing a link to BugGuide so that you can compare your specimens to the images to see if you are able to at least determine a family.  We do not have the training necessary to provide any dependable taxonomy.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: what is this insect
Location: ms
November 27, 2013 5:48 pm
Please help me
Signature: kasie dickerson

Stump Stabber

Stump Stabber

Dear kasie,
This Giant Ichnuemon in the genus
Megarhyssa is commonly called a Stump Stabber because of the method employed by the female when laying eggs.

Update:  April 8, 2014
We are frequently asked if Giant Ichneumons can sting, and we always reply that they cannot.  We just found a fascinating article.  According to Icheumon Wasps by Lloyd Eighme on Skagit.wsu:  “It might frighten you, but if you could watch it long enough you would be amazed at what it does. It lands on the bark of a tree and crawls up and down, tapping with its long antennae, obviously searching for something. Eventually it finds the spot it is looking for and begins to drill into the bark with its long needle-like ovipositor. It has detected the larva of a horntail wasp chewing its tunnel in the wood an inch or more below the surface of the bark. The ovipositor is made up of three stiff threads, hardened by minerals, that fit together with a groove in the center. Vibrating those sharppointed threads forces them into the bark and sapwood of the tree to contact the horntail grub in its tunnel. An egg is forced down the ovipositor to parasitize the grub. If the ichneumon parasite larva killed its host, they would both die, trapped in the solid wood which the parasite is unable to chew. It only feeds on the nonvital organs like the fat body until its host has nearly completed its life cycle and has chewed its way out near the surface of the bark. Then it kills and consumes its host grub and completes its own life cycle to emerge as another giant ichneumon wasp in the genus Megarhyssa (mega=large; rhyssa=tail) to start over again. You can see both Megarhyssa and its horntail wasp host in the MG collection.
People often ask if the ichneumon wasps will sting them with their needle-like ovipositors. The wasps are interested only in laying eggs in caterpillars or other insects, but if you handle a live one it may try to sting you in self-defense. Small ones could not likely penetrate your skin, but larger ones might be able to

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Subject: What Is It?
Location: Goderich, Ontario, Canada
November 18, 2013 8:52 am
I found this little one on the side of the house. It was about 1 cm long.
Signature: Dale

Flightless Ichneumon:  Gelis species

Flightless Ichneumon: Gelis species

Dear Dale,
We were immediately excited upon viewing your photo.  We knew that though this looked like an ant, it is more likely a parasitic wasp and judging by the ovipositor, that the individual is female.  We quickly discovered the genus
Gelis on BugGuide where we found this matching photo.  According to BugGuide:  “Many species of Gelis are wingless. Habits are diverse. Many are external parasites of Lepidoptera in cocoons, others are parasitic on Symphyta, spiders, Diptera larvae and pupae, or wood-boring Coleoptera larvae. Many are Hyperparasites.”   This is news to us as we did not realize there were wingless Ichneumons.

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Subject: black long legs big head beetle?
Location: Miami Florida
November 14, 2013 9:26 pm
Dear whats that bug,
I just found this visitor in our bathroom in the morning in November in Miami Florida.
Is not as beautiful as other bugs that i see in this website but I am just move by curiosity.
I could not found any picture online exactly as this guy . I think is a beetle
I took the pic with my cell phone and the animal was very high in the wall so i couldn’t get closer.
Thank you in advance
Signature: vlad

Ensign Wasp

Ensign Wasp

Dear Vlad,
This is an Ensign Wasp, and you should probably welcome it into your home.  The female Ensign Wasp parasitizes the ootheca or egg case of a Cockroach, and the developing Ensign Wasp larva feeds upon the eggs and developing Cockroaches, helping to control the population of an insect that very few people, even the most tolerant, will relish having in their homes.

Dear Daniel Marlos,
Thank you for your fast reply. I need to work in my id skills! Good that I leave it alone as I normally do with insects (with the exception of cockroaches).
Vlad

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination