Currently viewing the category: "Ichneumons"
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Subject: What is this
Location: Winnipeg mb canada
June 5, 2015 4:41 pm
What is this thing I accidentally stepped on
Signature: Kayla

Ichneumon

Ichneumon

Dear Kayla,
This very distinctly marked parasitic Ichneumon is
Rhyssa lineolata, which you can verify on BugGuide.  We wonder how many times you are going to refer to the dictionary with this information on the feeding habits that are posted on BugGuide:  “idiobiont ectoparasitoids of the immature wood-boring endopterygote insects, in our area usually larval woodwasps (Siricidae and Xiphydriidae), but may also develop as facultative hyperparasitoids using other woodwasp parasitoids as hosts or on virtually any endopterygote (some have even been cultured in the laboratory on entirely unnatural surrogate hosts).” 

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Subject: Dragonfly/Yellow Jacket
Location: Pembroke, ON.
June 2, 2015 8:26 am
A friend of mine spotted this interesting insect on the side of a home the other day in Pembroke, ON. I don’t really have too many details, However, I do have an image! They’re calling it a “Dragonbee”
Signature: However

Male Stumpstabber

Male Stumpstabber

Dear However,
As much as we like the name “Dragonbee”, we are not ready to promote it as an alternate name for this male Stump Stabber, though one would probably never attribute that name to the male of a
Megarhyssa species.  The name is quite apt for the female Stump Stabber which actually stabs stumps with her long ovipositor while laying eggs that will eventually parasitize a larval Wood Wasp. We believe your Stump Stabber is Megarhyssa macrurus, based on images posted to BugGuide and the listed range data there.

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Subject: Pacific Northwest Ichneumon
Location: Renton, WA
May 28, 2015 4:28 pm
I’ve been seeing about 50 of these guys parade my front and back yard over the grass areas. They do not seem to be harmful, and only hover over the grass areas. I did research and came across your website to find out it’s an “ichneumon wasp” according to Eric Eaton on another post. Would you happen to know where they nest or why they’re parading my lawn areas for? At first they looked like yellow jackets, but their bodies are much too skinny and orange to be. The pics I’ll include are from a few days ago. Any info would be great. Thanks.
Signature: Stephanie

Unknown Ichneumon

Unknown Ichneumon

Hi Stephanie,
We noticed your comment on the other Ichneumon posting, and we still are not able to provide a species identification for this Ichneumon.  Ichneumon Wasps do not build a nest.  They are parasitoids of a variety of insects and arthropods, and they are generally very host specific.  The female lays an egg on a host, or sometimes she uses her ovipositor to deposit eggs within the host.  The larvae then feed on the still living host.  Again, Ichneumons are not social wasps, but they are very important natural, biological controls for other insect populations, hence they are beneficial.  Most Ichneumons are perfectly harmless to humans, though members of the genus
Ophion are known to sting, but they are still not considered harmful to humans.

Unknown Ichneumon

Unknown Ichneumon

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Subject: Weird Bug
Location: Harrisburg PA
May 23, 2015 5:46 am
Dear WTB:
I was hoping you could tell me what kind of insect this is. I found it hanging out on my screen door this morning and it scared the crap outta me! It’s all different colors and has this long tail? It’s not a stinger because it could move it. All together it’s probably about 8-12 inches long. I hope you can ID it for me! Thanks so much!
Signature: Audrey

Stump Stabber

Stump Stabber

Dear Audrey,
This is a Giant Ichneumon in the genus
Megarhyssa, a group that is commonly called Stump Stabbers because the female uses her lengthy ovipositor to lay eggs beneath the surface of trees infested with the wood boring larvae of Wood Wasps like the Pigeon Horntail.  We have never heard of a person being stung by a Giant Icheumon in the genus Megarhyssa, so we consider them to be harmless, though there is one group of Ichneumons in the genus Ophion with shorter ovipositors that are reported to sting people.

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Subject: Stinging bug
Location: colorodo
April 7, 2015 8:55 pm
got stung in the leg. Never seen a bug like this before.
Signature: kW

Short Tailed Ichneumon

Short Tailed Ichneumon

Dear kW,
We believe your parasitic Ichneumon Wasp is a Short Tailed Ichneumon in the genus
Ophion, one of the few genera in the family known to sting.  The sting is not considered dangerous.  According to BugGuide:  “Most all Ophion larva are parasites of caterpillars.”

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Subject: What is this bug?
Location: Georgetown KY
March 25, 2015 8:05 pm
My husband was stung by this bug. We have never seen one before. It is red and flies. What is it?
Signature: Diana

Ichneumon

Short Tailed Ichneumon

Dear Diana,
This is an Ichneumon, a member of a family of parasitic wasps.  Most Ichneumons are perfectly harmless, though there is one genus, Ophion, that is reported to sting.  Your individual appears to be a member of the genus Ophion, the Short Tailed Ichneumons, which you can read more about on BugGuide.  We believe this is the insect that is mistaken for a stinging Crane Fly as Crane Flies do not sting.

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