Currently viewing the category: "Parasitic Hymenopterans"
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Subject: Unknown bug
Location: Pittsburgh, Pa
January 29, 2016 1:29 pm
Hi bugman,
I am a service manager for a pest management company in Pittsburgh. We have a current issue with an insect in a restaurant. It is tiny with wings and is attracted to light. They are finding them along the windows along storefront and in light fixtures on first floor. No activity in basement. No second floor. Some old barn wood is inside but it has been there for several years. It appears to have an ovipositor.
Signature: thank you, Joe Ryan

Unknown Parasitic Hymenopteran

Unknown Parasitic Hymenopteran

Dear Joe,
We are not certain we will be able to provide more than a very general identification.  This is some species of Parasitic Hymenopteran, and the prominent ovipositor is used by the female to lay eggs.  Finding them indoors leads us to believe that they are preying upon some other insect or arthropod that is living in the restaurant.  Though this insect does not present a problem, it is a sign that there is something else living in the restaurant that is providing food.  Cockroaches would be a likely food source, but this is most definitely NOT an Ensign Wasp, a species that parasitizes the oothecae or egg sacs of Cockroaches.  You can try browsing the pages of BugGuide for Parasitic Hymenopterans. 

Thanks for the reply Daniel.
Although this restaurant has had problems in the past with Oriental roaches in the basement there has not been any activity reported for a year. None of these insects were found in basement along windows. I have some samples on a monitoring trap that I have to get to our Univar rep.
thanks again.
Joe

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Subject: Redhead with white tip on tail
Location: Sabang, Palawan, Philippines
February 1, 2016 2:43 am
Hi, we saw this strange bug in remnant of tropical rainforest in Palawan, Philippines. Any ideas what it is?
Signature: Lyn and Andrew

Possibly Ichneumon from Philippines

Stephanid Wasp from Philippines

Dear Lyn and Andrew,
This really is an unusual looking insect, and though we are unable to provide you with a species identity, we can tell you it is a Parasitic Hymenopteran, possibly a member of the family Braconidae, the Braconid Wasps or the family Ichneumonidae, the Ichneumon Wasps.  We will continue to try to research its identity and perhaps we will get some assistance from our readership.  The bright red head is very distinctive, and the white tipped tail is actually the ovipositor the female uses to lay her eggs.  Parasitic Hymenopterans prey upon a vast array of insects, including butterflies, moths, cockroaches spiders, often attacking the immature stages like eggs, larvae and pupae.

Many thanks Daniel. I kept researching myself – ? gasteruptidae? Thoughts? Lyn

Hi again Lyn,
The general shape of a Carrot Wasp in the family Gasteruptidae looks very close, but we cannot find any images with such a distinctive red head.

Update:  Stephanid Wasp
We received a comment informing us that this wasp is in the family Stephanidae, and we have members of the family in our archives from North America that are called Crown of Thorns Wasps.  The submitted image looks very similar to images of the Crown Wasp,
Megischus insularis, that are posted on Nature Love You.

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Ed. Note:  We don’t often have instances of plagiarism, but we believe we have been duped by Idk (email address name Clio Baumgardner) with this image which does not appear to have been shot by Idk, despite the claims in the body of the submission.  We overlooked the copyright information on the image which does not match either the Idk signature or the Clio Baumgardner return email address.  Once we began to suspect, after Eucharitid expert John Heraty wrote “it certainly didn’t come from California (Old World only),” we located the image on the Myrmecos Blog Best Insect Photos of 2009 and credited to Rundstedt B. Rovillos.  We also found it on FlickR where it is also credited to Rundstedt B. Rovillos.  Plainly and simply, stealing images from the internet is dishonest and it is plagiarism.  Idk is a thief.

Subject: Weird Bug
Location: California
January 10, 2016 2:41 pm
I found the super weird bug hanging in my favorite picnic spot, I’m wondering what it is! Luckily I got a clear shot of the bug. 🐜🐞🐌
Signature: Idk

Eucharitid Wasp

Eucharitid Wasp

Dear Idk,
This really is an unusual looking insect, and our gut instincts said “Parasitic Hymenopteran” however we could not find any matching images on BugGuide.  The feathered antennae are quite unusual for Hymenopterans, which include Ants, Bees and Wasps, so we did a web search of “wasp feathered antennae” and we discovered this image on FlickR that is identified as a Eucharitid Wasp from the Philippines with this information:  “Eucharitid wasps are specialized parasitoids of ants. Larvae develop inside ant nests feeding on ant brood. Adult wasps sometimes form large mating swarms in meadows, where the females oviposit in plant material. Young larvae attach themselves to passing ants, or to ant prey items, to be carried into the ant nest.”  There is another image with no information on Pinoy PHotography.  We couldn’t find any images on BugGuide with that distinctive thoracic spine, though we did find a species on BugGuide,
Pseudochalcura gibbosa, that has feathered antenna.  We found a similar image on the UC Riverside site, but there is no species name.  PBase has an Ecuadorean individual called a Bison Wasp.  We would really like to be able to provide you with a species identification, so we are contacting Eric Eaton for his input.  Could you also provide us with a city in California where this Eucharitid was sighted?  We hope they prey on invasive Argentine Ants.

Eric Eaton Responds
Hi, Daniel:
Happy New Year!
I found I already liked the Facebook page for WTB, and saw this posted there.  I have shared it with the “Hymenopterists Forum” group, which is filled with experts on all things ants, bees, and wasps.  Someone there should be able to offer help.  I’ll keep checking the results.
Eric

Identification by expert John Heraty:  Schizaspidia species
Daniel:
This, from John Heraty, a world authority on the family:
“This is Schizaspidia (Eucharitidae), but it certainly didn’t come from California (Old World only).”
Eric

We write back to Idk for clarification.
Hi again Idk,
Please clarify where in California this image was shot as it is not a California species.  It is also curious that the name on the file is Rundstedt B Rovillos, which is different from the Idk you signed and the Clio Baumgardner return address on the email.

We write to Rundstedt.
Dear Rundstedt,
This gorgeous image was just submitted to What’s That Bug? and after posting it and having it identified as a Schizaspidia species thanks to the opinion of Eucharitid expert John Heraty, we realized that the image was plagiarized from the internet.  We hope you will allow us to continue to keep the image on our site, correctly credited to you.
Daniel Marlos

Dear Daniel,
Thank you for bringing this matter to my attention. I am the owner of this image.This tiny wasp was photographed at La Mesa Ecopark located in Fairview, Quezon City Philippines several years ago.
Yes, you may keep this image on your site to inform others about this beautiful creature.
Cheers!
Rundstedt Rovillos

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What kind of bug is this?
Location: Coral Springs, Florida
December 28, 2015 11:44 am
I have found several of these, of various size, inside my house. You may not be able to see in this picture, but they do have wings. The sightings are sporadic with maybe a few weeks in between. We live in South Florida.
Signature: Michele Myers

Ensign Wasp

Ensign Wasp

Dear Michele,
If you are finding similar creatures in different sizes, you may be dealing with more than one species, but the insect in the attached image is a beneficial Ensign Wasp.  Ensign Wasps parasitize the oothecae or egg cases of Cockroaches, helping to control populations of what many folks consider to be household pests.

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Subject: What is this bug?
Location: Memphis, TN
December 12, 2015 6:03 pm
Hello,
I found this guy crawling on me. I live in Memphis, TN. It was on me yesterday (December 11, 2015). The weather is unusually warm her right now. It looks like some sort of wasp-like bug, but I have never seen one with this coloring.
Thanks,
Signature: Vera

Ichneumon

Ichneumon

Dear Vera,
This is a parasitic relative of wasps from the family Ichneumonidae, and based on the black and white antennae, we believe it may be in the genus
Cryptanura which can be found on BugGuide.  Ichenumons are considered harmless to humans as most members of the family do not sting.  In our effort to educate the public about insects, we have created an Unnecessary Carnage tag and we hope any future encounters you have with this harmless beneficial insect will not result in a similar outcome.

Thank you Daniel! Hopefully the next time I encounter one, it won’t be in my shirt. 😊

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Help with a big bug
Location: Yardley PA
December 5, 2015 2:56 pm
We just spotted this large bug on our window screen. Is it a type of ichneumon wasp?
We live in Yardley PA.
Thanks,
Jessica
Signature: The graffius family

Giant Ichneumon

Giant Ichneumon

Dear Jessica,
This seems very late in the season for a Giant Ichneumon sighting in Pennsylvania, but this is nonetheless a Giant Ichneumon in the genus
Megarhyssa, most likely Megarhyssa macrurus.

Thank you so much for the quick response. It has been unusually warm so maybe that explains it. Can’t wait to tell the kids more about this bug. We get a lot of types at our house.
Jessica

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination