Currently viewing the category: "Wasps and Hornets"
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Thread-waisted Wasp in Portugal
Location: Portugal (37º31’55.23”N 8º26’33.53”W)
November 18, 2011 1:28 pm
Hi,
Please can you help me identify the attached picture of a Thread-waisted Wasp. The picture was taken on 10th September in southern Portugal while it was building its brood chamber which you can see in the picture. The brood chamber was made on a south-facing stone wall 150 mts above sea level and at the end of a few days the wasp sealed the opening.
Thanks and regards,
Frank
Signature: Frank

Potter Wasp constructs nest

Hi Frank,
This is actually a Potter Wasp in the subfamily Eumeninae.  They construct a mud nest that is provisioned with food for the developing larva.  Moth Caterpillars are a common larval food.  This posting is postdated to go live in early January.

Dear Daniel,
Thanks a ton.
Ciao,
Frank
PS You can see what others have said about us by visiting this page on Tripadvisor.
www.paradiseinportugal.com
www.birdinginportugal.com
Paradise in Portugal
Quinta do Barranco da Estrada
7665 – 880 Santa Clara a Velha
Portugal

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Wasp?
Location: Perth, Western Australia
December 21, 2011 2:30 am
I was wondering if you can identify this wasp or fly for me. It was on my clothes line on a peg at 7am on 20/12/11. It was quite big – 3cm not including the antenna, and was photographed in Perth, Western Australia.
Signature: Jennifer O

Sawfly, possibly

Dear Jennifer O,
In our opinion, this appears to be a Sawfly.  Sawflies are in the same order, Hymenoptera, as Wasps, Bees and Ants, but Sawflies do not sting.  We cannot find a match on the Brisbane Insect website, nor did we find a convincing match on the Lifeunseen website.  The Australian Museum website indicates there are 176 species in Australia.  Larvae of Sawflies are sometimes mistaken for caterpillars and they are communal feeders that may defoliate plants if they are especially numerous.  Perhaps one of our readers will be able to either correct our identification or provide a matching online image that may identify the species.

Unknown Sawfly, we believe

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

wasp
Location: melbourne, australia
December 18, 2011 6:42 am
This huge ie 4-5 cm wasp was dragging huntsman spider up the window. Spider still seemed alive
I live in Melbourne, Australia and it is December-beginning of Summer.
Wasp not aggressive to me, BUT NOT HAPPY when I hit it with a broom. It dropped twitching spider & flew off!
Signature: Dom

Spider Wasp and Huntsman Spider Prey

Dear Dom,
We have several excellent images of Australian Spider Wasps with Huntsman Spider prey in our archives.  The female Spider Wasp stings and paralyzes the Spider and then drags it back to her burrow to act as food for her brood.  The adult wasps feed on nectar.  We can imagine that it is a difficult task for the female Spider Wasp to locate her prey, sting it and then begin the long haul back to her burrow, and it is quite unfortunate that your broom hitting incident interrupted her task.  We hope that now that you are better informed, you will allow these food chain dramas to play out without unnecessary interventions in the future.

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

another scary bug in my cottage in India
Location: Andhra Pradesh, India
December 11, 2011 10:19 am
Hi – thanks for identifying the Assassin Bug for me last month, and now I’ve found another, even more bizarre thing in my house. Any ideas, please?
Signature: Steve Sargent

Potter Wasp, we believe

Dear Steve,
WE are relatively certain, based on the body shape, which is described on BugGuide as:  “First two abdominal segments forming a tapered petiole linking abdomen and thorax.”   Potter Wasps are in the subfamily Eumeninae and your individual might be in the genus
Eumenes.  We found a match for body shape on the Krishna Mohan Photography website, and then we found what really resembles your species on the India Nature Watch website.  Potter Wasps often build nests that resemble small ceramic pots.

Potter Wasp, we believe

Dear Daniel,
Many thanks for identifying my Potter Wasp – and so quickly!  The photos which you pointed me to are amazing, and the information is very interesting indeed.
All the best,
Steve

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Nasty Wasp
Location: Hawkesbury, Sydney, Australia
December 4, 2011 5:19 pm
Hello again,
Wondering if you can identify this wasp. Sorry the picture is not too clear, but these are aggressive wasps and they’re deep in a fairly dense garden. I didn’t want to get any closer or move the bushes around in case I provoked an attack. The nest is in a geranium bush, but quite low to the ground and is around 8-10cm across. The wasps themselves are about 2.5-3cm long. My boyfriend was gardening there and was stung on the knee when he accidentally disturbed them. The sting was extremely painful and shortly afterwards he came over very hot for a while. The sting area was painful for about 2 weeks.
We are in the Hawkesbury region, a rural area about an hour out of Sydney.
Signature: Tracy

Paper Wasps

Hi Tracy,
These are Paper Wasps in the genus
Polistes.  They are not normally aggressive, but they will defend their nest.  We just finished posting another submission of Paper Wasps from Australia.

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Wasp Nest.
Location: Nsw, Australia, Near the coast.
December 2, 2011 3:02 am
Hi. I thought you might like some pictures of what we’ve always called a paper wasp nest, although I don’t know if thats what they actually are. I was very frightened that they would fly at me and start stinging me every time the flash whent off. I hope you like the pictures.
Thanks.
Signature: Emma

Paper Wasps and Nest

Hi Emma,
Thank you for braving danger to take photographs of these Paper Wasps in the genus
Polistes working on constructing their nest.  Paper Wasps are not normally aggressive, however, they will defend the nest.  We believe, based on photos posted to the Brisbane Insect website, that your wasps might be the Common Paper Wasp or Australian Paper Wasp, Polistes humilis.  There is a page dedicated to the species on the Brisbane Insect website.

Paper Wasps and Nest

Hi! I think the reason they didn’t attack me is because it was a rainy day. They seemed to be sleeping, they weren’t moving much. Thanks for letting me know what they are! I’ve found three nests around the farm already, without even looking very hard.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination