Currently viewing the category: "Wasps and Hornets"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: what is this please
Location: cheshire, uk
October 12, 2012 2:56 am
my friend found this in work, it flew in through the window. could you please help identify it.
thank you
Signature: sharon

Parasitoid Wasp

Hi Sharon,
This is some species of Parasitoid Wasp, most likely an Ichneumon or possibly a Braconid.  We did not find any matching images in our initial web search.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Pine grub of some sort
Location: western NC
October 11, 2012 7:05 pm
Hello! I found these little fellows munching on a lil pine tree…. Have since collected them and sent them out in the woods, to munch on pines a bit further away from the house. (or for other animals to munch on, perhaps)
I am assuming they’re grubs, because they don’t have feet all the way down like ’pillers do…just a few at the front and a couple at the back end.
I realize bugs serve a purpose, but I’m wondering…should I have squished these? I hate killing anything, even the harmful bugs. 😉
Signature: not a bug hater

Possibly Pine Sawfly Larvae

Dear not a bug hater,
We cannot be certain because there is not enough detail in your photograph, but we believe these are Sawfly Larvae, possibly the Introduced Pine Sawfly,
Diprion similis, which you can find pictured on BugGuide.  Here is a remark from BugGuide:  “Introduced from Europe: first reported in North America in 1914, in Connecticut. Although a serious pest at times, it normally stunts rather than kills its hosts. It can be a more serious problem with young trees and in cases such as Christmas trees where appearance is important. It has natural enemies and diseases, so large outbreaks are only intermittently seen.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: The Bingo Bug
Location: Scotland
October 10, 2012 6:41 pm
I found this wee creature hanging on the wall in my workplace, a bingo club. I’ve never seen anything like it at work, I don’t think I’ve seen anything like it at all! Can you help me and my colleagues find out what it is?
Many thanks,
Becky
Signature: Any way you’d like.

Ichneumon

Dear Any way you’d like,
This is an Ichneumon parasitoid wasp.
  According to the Cornell University Department of Entomology Biological Control website:  “Insect parasitoids have an immature life stage that develops on or within a single insect host, ultimately killing the host, hence the value of parasitoids as natural enemies. Adult parasitoids are free-living and may be predaceous. Parasitoids are often called parasites, but the term parasitoid is more technically correct. Most beneficial insect parasitoids are wasps or flies, although some rove beetles (see Predators) and other insects may have life stages that are parasitoids.  Most insect parasitoids only attack a particular life stage of one or several related species. The immature parasitoid develops on or within a pest, feeding on body fluids and organs, eventually leaving the host to pupate or emerging as an adult. The life cycle of the pest and parasitoid can coincide, or that of the pest may be altered by the parasitoid to accommodate its development.  The life cycle and reproductive habits of beneficial parasitoids can be complex. In some species, only one parasitoid will develop in or on each pest while, in others, hundreds of young larvae may develop within the pest host. Overwintering habits may also vary. Female parasitoids may also kill many pests by direct feeding on the pest eggs and immatures.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this?!
Location: Woy woy, NSW. 2257 AUSTRALIA
October 4, 2012 7:08 am
I’m from Australia so I don’t know if you will be able to identify this ant looking thing
Was found crawling along wood in my friends dads backyard shed.
I’ve searched and searched and can’t find a thing about it!
Are you able to help?
Signature: Katie Wright

Flower Wasp

Hi Katie,
This is a flightless female Flower Wasp.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Small Parasitic Wasp
Location: Rose Hill, CA
October 3, 2012 9:24 pm
Dear Bugman,
I just found this little miss as I was cleaning up my kitchen. I only know she is a wasp but I have no idea what kind. She is approximately 1/2” long excluding her antennae.
Signature: joAnn

Ichneumon

Hi joAnn,
Your photos are of excellent quality, however, we do not believe we have the necessary skills to provide you with a species identification.  We agree that this is a parasitic wasp, most likely an Ichneumon.  According to BugGuide, the family contains:  “About 5,000 described species in North America, possibly 3,000 more undescribed(2); arguably, the largest animal family, with the estimated 60,000 species worldwide (up to 100,000, according to some estimates(3).)”

Ichneumon

Good morning Daniel,
Thank you for that identification!
In looking at the images on BugGuide as well as others on the internet I agree on Ichneumon. Ironically as a kid that was one of my favorite insects to name out of one of my insect books yet I never realized that they came in such a diminutive size. I have a whole new found fascination for last nights house guest.
Best,
joAnn

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Cicada killer? or Yellow Jacket?
Location: Tampa, FL
October 2, 2012 9:34 pm
I just took this picture minutes ago on my back patio. This insect is parked on the edge of the cat food bowl and is happily posing as long as I needed. It’s still there, but I’m thinking that I need to get it outside in the yard for survival. I have looked through a lot of images and I’m leaning toward Cicada Killer, but the markings are a bit different. It’s Oct. 2nd at 10pm in Tampa, Florida.
Signature: Shell K

Tiphid Wasp

Dear Shell,
This appears to us to be a Tiphid Wasp in the genus
Myzinum, most likely a female based on this description posted to BugGuide:  “Females are robust, with short, curled antennae and heavy hind femora (“thighs”). Males are very slender with long, straight antennae and a prominent curved “pseudostinger” at the tip of the abdomen.”  In a previous posting to our website, we posted this description from BugGuide, “A slender, shining black wasp, with yellow crossbands. Males are more slender than the females and have an upturned black hook at the end of the abdomen. There are 5 yellow bands on the abdomen of the female (the second is broken in the middle) and 6 narrow, more regular ones in the male. Both head and thorax are marked with yellow. Legs of the males are strongly yellow, but they are reddish in females. Wings are brown.“   However, we cannot locate that citation at its source any longer.  We are relatively certain the species if the Five Banded Tiphid Wasp, Myzinum quinquecinctum.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination