Currently viewing the category: "Wasps and Hornets"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: flying insect
Location: New Jersey, interior
April 19, 2013 9:24 am
Hi there! This one was on an upstairs window screen this morning, and its size is what struck me: it’s close to 2 inches in length.
I’d like to remove the screen to free it to the outside but need to know if it stings (I’m allergic and must be careful of such things…).
Thanks for your help!
Signature: Mila

European Hornet Queen

European Hornet Queen

Dear Mila,
This is a European Hornet,
Vespa crabro, a species introduced to North America in the 1800s.  We suspect this is a queen that recently emerged from hibernation and that she will look for a suitable place to begin building a new nest to start a new colony.  See BugGuide for additional information.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Spider Wasp
Location: White River, South Africa
April 19, 2013 6:58 am
Hi Bugman
Thanks for your reply. As it happens I did take some photographs. My wife has most of the shots and it going to try and upgrade the quality of the photos, but I have attached three in their original state for your perusal.
Signature: Steve

Spider Wasp with Huntsman Spider

Spider Wasp with Huntsman Spider

Dear Steve,
Thank you so much for writing back and providing photos to the comment you posted on the Spider Wasp from South Africa posting.  Many Spider Wasps have a
metallic sheen and we are curious if your personal observations included the purplish color of the posting you commented upon.  We get most of our Spider Wasp and Huntsman Spider submissions from Australia.  We are running a bit late this morning, but we will try to identify this species of Spider Wasp in the near future.  Your photos are wonderful.  We believe that the Spider Wasp might be dragging the Spider up the wall in an effort to glide as far as possible.  The wasp could never get off the ground with such a heavy payload, but by taking off from a higher elevation, she can still make use of flight to return to her burrow.

Spider Wasp with Rain Spider

Spider Wasp with Rain Spider

Thank you for reminding us that Huntsman Spiders are known as Rain Spiders in some parts of their range.  Your previous comment mentioned the pain of the sting.  Do you know this firsthand.  North American Tarantula Hawks, another large group of Spider Wasps, are also reported to have among the most painful stings of any insect.

Spider Wasp with Rain Spider

Spider Wasp with Rain Spider

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: mud nests or cocoons?
Location: Grand Junction Colorado
April 13, 2013 6:38 pm
We found these under a wood deck. Somewhat similar to ’earth’/mud nests made by wasps, but I am pretty sure that yellowjacket wasps are not what made these. They are about 1” long.
Signature: shreddly phreddly

Mud Wasp Nest

Mud Wasp Nest

Dear shreddly phreddly,
We agree that this is a Wasp Nest, but it is not a Yellowjacket Nest.  Yellowjackets are social wasps that build a paper nest.  The mud nest builders are solitary wasps.  Wasps in several different families construct nests of mud that are provisioned with food for the developing larvae.  Breaking one of the cells to view the contents might help to identify the nest builder more specifically.

Mud Wasp Nest

Mud Wasp Nest

Daniel:
thanks!  yeah, we were sorta freaktout when we turned the deck over and saw that assemblage (a dozen, i think).  It did look somewhat like something out of a science fixion or horror movie!
Jay K (shredd Phredd)

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Asian Wasp/Hornet with Orange Legs
Location: Singapore
April 13, 2013 8:50 pm
I’m surprised I couldn’t find any reference to this wasp online as it’s a very striking insect. It was eating voraciously on these white flowers. It has long orange legs and a bluish/violet tint to its wings. There were about 6 wasps in this group feeding on this particular plant.
Signature: David

Spider Wasp

Spider Wasp

Hi David,
In our opinion, this appears to be a Spider Wasp in the family Pompilidae.  There is a list of identifying features on BugGuide, and this description of the leg fits your photographs:  “Slender with long and spiny legs, hind femora typically extending beyond tip of abdomen.
Tibiae of rear legs have two prominent spines at apex (distal end, next to tarsi).”

Spider Wasp

Spider Wasp

Spider Wasps often visit flowers in search of nectar, and female Spider Wasps prey upon Spiders to provide food for her brood.

Spider Wasp

Spider Wasp

 


What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Strange bug
Location: Hong Kong/China
April 13, 2013 7:32 am
We were in china last summer, and we saw this strange bug with purple wings and orange legs, it seemed to be eating a spider. It was as big as a pointer finger, and really scary.
I took the picture.
Signature: -Catie

Spider Wasp attacks Huntsman Spider

Spider Wasp attacks Huntsman Spider

Dear Catie,
The predator is a Spider Wasp in the family Pompilidae and the prey appears to be a Huntsman Spider in the family Sparassidae.  The spider is not being eaten by the wasp.  Female Spider Wasps hunt and paralyze Spiders to feed to their broods.  The paralyzed spider provides fresh, not dry meat for the developing wasp larva.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Insect identification
Location: Miami, FL
April 11, 2013 4:35 pm
Hi, I was wondering if you could help me identify this insect I found inside my home, flying near a window. The end of its abdomen was wiggling around quite a bit and was even folded back a few times. I’ve attached a few photos I took with my phone.
Thanks a lot.
Signature: Kevin

Ensign Wasp

Ensign Wasp

Hi Kevin,
This is an Ensign Wasp, and you should probably welcome it into your house as they lay their eggs in the ootheca or eggcases of Cockroaches.  The larval wasps then feed on the developing Cockroaches.

Ensign Wasp

Ensign Wasp


What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination