Currently viewing the category: "Wasps and Hornets"
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Subject: Daniel – New Bee?
Location: Hawthorne, CA
October 3, 2013 12:41 pm
Hi Daniel,
We saw what we are pretty sure is a bee in the back today and I know I’ve not seen one like this before. It also did a lot of crawling around on the gravel paths. Can you help?
Signature: Thanks, Anna Carreon

Sand Wasp

Sand Wasp

Hi Anna,
Perhaps this Sand Wasp in the genus Bembix was crawling on the gravel path in an effort to find a good location to build an underground burrow.  Female Sand Wasps provision the nest with Flies for the larval wasps. 

Sand Wasp

Sand Wasp

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: It’s like a wasp
Location: Southeast Missouri
October 2, 2013 2:25 pm
I wanna know what this thing is, it kinda looks like a big ass red wasp. My friend said it was a horse wasp but I don’t know
Signature: -Hunter Ham

Pigeon Horntail

Pigeon Horntail

Dear Hunter Ham,
This Wood Wasp is known as a Pigeon Horntail.  The larvae bore in the wood of dead and dying trees.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What’s this bug
Location: Coorg hills, India
October 3, 2013 5:45 am
I got stung by this, please identify it
Signature: YC

Unknown Hornet

Greater Banded Hornet

Dear YC,
After some time searching, we believe we have correctly identified your Greater Banded Hornet,
Vespa tropica, thanks to images posted on BlogSpot and TrekNature which states:  “This species is a subterranean wasp. Adults are medium to large sized, dark brown to black and yellowish orange marked on the gaster. This species is very similar to Vespa affinis, but easily distinguished from the latter by bright yellow or yellow orange at the second gastral segment.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this insect?
Location: NE Ohio
September 29, 2013 9:36 am
This was found in Ohio. I’ve never seen an insect like this let along one that has a stinger that long. Approximate size of stinger was 3-4”
Signature: Mike

Stump Stabber

Stump Stabber

Hi Mike,
This is a female Giant Ichneumon in the genus
Megarhyssa, most likely Megarhyssa macrurus or Megarhyssa nortoni.  Giant Ichneumons are commonly called Stump Stabbers.  What you have mistaken for a stinger is the ovipositor of the female.  A female Stump Stabber inserts her ovipositor beneath the bark of a dead or dying tree that is infested with wood boring larvae of Wood Wasps like the Pigeon Horntail.  Your photo is most interesting for us because we almost always receive images of Stump Stabbers stabbing stumps.  We have read that adults take nectar, and your photo appears to illustrate a nectaring female.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What kind of wasp is this
Location: Pensacola, Florida
September 24, 2013 12:56 pm
I found a couple of wasps nests around an old building and noticed two types of wasps. One type looked normal but the other type had very long wings. What type of Wasp is this
Signature: Lanhill

Paper Wasps

Paper Wasps

Hi Lanhill,
These are Paper Wasps in the genus Polistes.  They are not considered dangerous, though we have been getting numerous reports of aggressive Red Wasps recently.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: First Fall Day. Fly/Bee/Hornet
Location: SW Michigan, USA
September 24, 2013 5:42 am
Here are a few more pics from my first full fall day foray in my backyard- in the middle of a mature oak forest. I’m sure that the hornet is an eastern Yellow Jacket, but it wasn’t pictured in my guidebook. The fly pictured was out in force on many leaves. The bee is half the size of the larger Bumblebees that I see. Could it be a Digger Bee? I’ve noticed in the last 2 weeks that they seem to nap on my Marigolds. I can actually stroke them with my finger and all they do is raise their middle pair of legs as if to say “leave me alone, I’m napping”. I’ve done this to many of them and they all react the same way.
Signature: d.k.dodge

Yellowjacket

Yellowjacket

Dear d.k. dodge,
Thank you for submitting nine photographs of insects and other bugs that you photographed on the first day of fall.  We are posting the photo of a Yellowjacket because we don’t have many nice close ups of them and your photo is quite detailed.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination