Currently viewing the category: "Wasps and Hornets"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: please help identify
Location: Candelon, NW Dominican Republic
March 1, 2014 8:15 am
Hi, This bug appeared in my gazebo recently here in the Dominican Republic. There are many types of bugs here but this is the first time I’ve seen this one. It measures approx 2″.
Our Haitian boys here tell me it’s dangerous an can kill a horse if bitten, but I think (hope !)that is probably an exaggeration. Body appears like black velvet. It seemed to be grazing on the newly painted concrete floor.
Any clue to what it is ?
Signature: Alistair Young

Tarantula Hawk

Tarantula Hawk

Dear Alistair,
This magnificent Spider Wasp is commonly called a Tarantula Hawk, but we cannot provide the exact species for you.  Female Tarantula Hawks hunt for Tarantulas, stinging them to paralyze them.  The Tarantula is then buried after the female Tarantula Hawk lays an egg on it.  The still living Tarantula provides a source of fresh meat for the developing larval wasp which feeds on the helpless, Tarantula.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Is it, could it be… a “Fairy Fly” wasp?
Location: Porto, Portugal
February 27, 2014 5:52 am
Olá WTB?,
I was on the laptop the other night, even looking at WTB when I saw a tiny, tiny bug on the screen, grabbed the camera and took some photos. The bug was very accommodating, apparently quite interested in the light from the computer screen. Finally though I encourage a transfer onto a paper receipt so I could hopefully get some better pics not in a backlit. But, still the tiny bug stretched the limits of my little camera.
It would seem the bug is at least a tiny wasp, but… is it possibly a fairy fly wasp? S/he seems to have long enough antennae and be small enough (that’s my middle finger in one of the photos and I have small hands). The receipt shows numbers on the other side that only measured about 1mm so that’s the size of the little flyer too.
Still February in Porto but the bugs are not waiting.
Thanks again for all you do. :)
Signature: Curious Girl

Parasitic Wasp

Parasitic Wasp

Dear Curious Girl,
We are posting your photos, and we hope some eminent expert on Parasitic Hymenopterans can provide you with a conclusive identification, but that is beyond the scope of our ability.  We believe this is some type of Parasitic Wasp, and you can view a wealth of species from North America on BugGuide.   At last, we are getting some rain in Los Angeles, but the experts warn that this is not a sign that the drought has ended as the snow pack is still well below average.  This rain will doubtless result in a fabulous display of desert wildflowers in the coming weeks.

Parasitic Wasp

Parasitic Wasp

Parasitic Wasp

Parasitic Wasp

Cool Daniel.
Do you think it could be Aphidiinae Braconidae (Braconid Wasp)?
Apparently they are part of Integrated Pest Management against aphids (and they get really convoluted when they attack). Funny as I did get a picture of an aphid just outside too that day though I wasn’t trying to get that one.
Here’s a couple bonus pics (though the “bug” doesn’t look much different in them). Hope you find them cool.
Plus, even though I know it messes with your system I’m sending a couple of a different tiny wasp from London’s Hyde Park last September because it came up in my search and they are so similar plus I just realized the victim for this wasp might be on the flower too! You think? I don’t believe I knew either were there when I took the picture. I think I was just trying to get the flower and the bonus was bugs.
Very cool on finally getting some rain, and hopefully some great flowers (take pictures!). I was in Death Valley once when it rained and it seemed almost immediately a bajillion tiny, tiny flowers carpeted the desert. As you no doubt know, lack of rain has not been a problem in this part of the world (especially the UK). When I was there in March ’12 they were thinking there might be a drought, so implemented water conservation only to have the 3rd wettest summer ever (which of course I also was able to experience… ::sigh::).

Parasitic Wasp

Parasitic Wasp checking out WTB?

Hi again Curious Girl,
We couldn’t resist posting your new photo in a shameless bit of self promotion.  We are also including your London image with the same posting, discarding all efforts at “neat” categorizations.  It has been pouring all night in Los Angeles, and we are expecting the rain to stay with us for over 24 hours.  It is a perfect day to stay home by the fire, but alas, we must soon drive to “the valley” for work.  We are not looking forward to the hectic morning commute.

Tiny Wasp

Tiny Wasp from London

 

 

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Strange fly – Accra Ghana
Location: Accra Ghana
February 25, 2014 9:53 am
Hi,
Live in Ghana, west Africa, these bugs keep appearing in my bedroom, never seen them before anywhere else. I’ve lived in the US before and never saw them there either. My biggest concern is if it is harmful, like carry some disease. Please help! Thanks
Signature: ND

Ensign Wasp

Ensign Wasp

Dear ND,
This is a Wasp, not a Fly, and it does not carry disease.  We are surmising that once we tell you that this is a beneficial Ensign Wasp that parasitizes the ootheca or egg cases of Cockroaches, helping to reduce their populations, that no additional individuals will fall victim to Unnecessary Carnage.

Dear Daniel,
I really appreciate the information and advice, especially knowing how much you have to work on each day.
I also want to assure you that these wasps will no longer suffer at my hands.
Best Regards
Nukunu

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this?
Location: Orange, nsw, Australia
February 20, 2014 4:25 am
Hi bug man, this flew into our house, i have never seen anything like it, could you please tell me what it is.
Signature: Tara

Crane Fly

Ichneumon

Hi Tara,
We believe this is a Crane Fly in the family Tipulidae.  There are some images on the Brisbane Insect site that look similar.

Correction
Subject: “Tipulidae” from Australia
February 22, 2014 11:52 am
Hi,
on Feb. Feb.20, 2014 “Tara” posted an isect from New South Wales, Australia.  You answered that this might be a crane fly / Tipulidae, but if you look at the wing venation it is evident that this insect does not belong to the Diptera at all, it’s Hymenoptera. It’ another parasitic Hymenoptera, Ichneumonidae or Braconidae. You may compare the wing venation of a Tipulidae here: http://www.metafysica.nl/nature/insect/hennig1954_7.jpg
Kind regards Erwin
Signature: Erwin Beyer

Thanks Erwin.  Because of an earlier comment, we have already addressed this error, and we will add your comment to the posting.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: found this on m kitchen table
Location: Southern California
February 20, 2014 8:41 pm
my son was eating lunch when I noticed this little beauty on my table! It is about 1 inch long, tip of antenna to end of abdomen. Six legs, two sets of wings. So beautiful! I have never seen these in my area before!
Signature: BB

Ichneumon

Ichneumon

Hi BB,
This parasitic Ichneumon Wasp is in the subfamily Ophioninae and you may read more about them on BugGuide.  This is one group that is frequently attracted to lights, and though we generally inform our readers that Ichneumons are harmless, we learned several years ago that this group is known to sting.  According to BugGuide:  “Females have a very compressed abdomen and a short, very sharp ovipositor. The ovipositor can penetrate the human skin; most other ichneumons can’t ‘sting’.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: idenifying an insect
Location: Kimberley, South Africa
February 19, 2014 3:53 am
We saw this bright yellow eyed fly in November near Kimberley, South Africa.
Any idea what it is?
Thanks
Tjeerd de Wit
Pretoria
Signature: t de wit

Sand Wasp or Fly???

Sand Wasp

Hi Tjeerd,
This looks more like a Sand Wasp than a Fly to us.  We may not have time to research this completely before rushing off to work this morning, but we are posting your photo now and we will continue to research this gorgeous creature when we return to our offices.
  Here is a Sand Wasp image from ISpot.  Those orange legs are sure pretty.  Your photo is gorgeous.

Thanks a lot. You remarks took me to this site: http://www.ispot.org.za/node/207535?nav=parent_ob where the same wasp is shown, a Crabronidaea
Many thanks.
Greetings
TdW

Hi again Tjeerd,
And there is a comment with a link to Wikipedia and the indication the genus of this beauty is
Tachysphex.  The Sand Wasp tribe of Bembicini is contained within the family Crabronidae.  We believe the superfamily (if our memory of the endings is correct) Crabronidaea may be an obsolete taxonomy.  Here is the BugGuide taxonomy.

Hello Daniel
Thanks for your help. I notice insects is/are your passion .
Now this wasp knows its place in the hierarchy. So many insects, so many names. Maybe it’s good many many insects have not been discovered yet, your life would be even more complicated.
Greetings
TdW

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination