Currently viewing the category: "Wasps and Hornets"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Butterfly?
Location: Lynnwood, WA
July 7, 2014 6:24 pm
Hello,
this “caterpillar” was found outside of my work. I kept it in a jar with dirt and leaves and sticks, within days it made what looks like a cocoon. But it doesn’t look like any cocoon I’ve ever seen.
Signature: Clarissa Fitting

Elm Sawfly larva

Elm Sawfly larva

Dear Clarissa,
This is not a caterpillar.  We hope you are not disappointed to learn that this is an Elm Sawfly Larva and not a caterpillar, because it is an easy mistake to make.  We are very excited because though we have numerous images of both the larva and the adult Elm Sawfly, your documentation is the first image we have received of the cocoon and pupa of an Elm Sawfly.  The adult Elm Sawfly looks like a large bee, and Sawflies are classified along with Ants, Bees and Wasps in the order Hymenoptera, but unlike its relatives, the Elm Sawfly does not sting and is perfectly harmless.

Elm Sawfly Cocoon

Elm Sawfly Cocoon

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: No idea what this monster of a bug is, HELP!
Location: North Battleford, Saskatchewan. Canada.
July 5, 2014 3:19 pm
Hello. this was found in North Battleford, Saskatchewan today. I’ve never seen it before around here. It looks like the stuff of nightmares. Please let me know what this is I’m dealing with !
Signature: Amzin

Elm Sawfly

Elm Sawfly

Dear Amzin,
The harmless Elm Sawfly is somewhat frightening in appearance because of its large size and the resemblance to stinging bees and wasps which are also members of the same order Hymenoptera, but the Elm Sawfly is incapable of stinging.  The larvae of the Elm Sawfly are often confused for caterpillars.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is it
Location: Minnesota
July 4, 2014 11:50 am
We saw this bug on our dying oak tree. He and his friends remind me of a scorpion but we live in Minnesota.
Signature: P.Pratt

Stump Stabber

Stump Stabber

Dear P.Pratt,
This is a magnificent image of a female
Megarhyssa atrata, commonly called a Stump Stabber.  The female Stump Stabber uses her lengthy ovipositor to place her eggs deep beneath the surface of dead and dying trees that are infested with the larvae of Pigeon Horntails and other Wood Wasps.  The larvae of the Stump Stabbers hatch and feed upon the larvae of the Wood Wasps.  They are considered parasitoids that parasitize and eventually kill the host insect.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Huge Bug on Mirror
Location: Vancouver, BC.
July 1, 2014 5:06 pm
Hi Bugman,
I’m trying to figure out what this is- it was in my friend’s house today and its HUGE! It looks like its some sort of Mantis or something- Any ideas?
Signature: Jonathan

Ichneumon startles residents

Ichneumon startles residents

Hi Jonathan,
The look on your face is quite startled.  This is some species of Ichneumon, a family of Parasitoid Wasps that are not aggressive, though we have occasionally gotten reports from folks who have been stung.  Female Ichneumons lay eggs on or near specific insect or arthropod hosts and the larval Ichneumon feeds on the host insect, eventually killing it.  We are unable to determine the species of Ichneumon that entered your friend’s home.  According to BugGuide, the family Ichneumonidae:  “About 5,000 described species in North America, possibly 3,000 more undescribed; arguably, the largest animal family, with the estimated 60,000 species worldwide (up to 100,000, according to some estimates).”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Ant
Location: north central Texas
July 1, 2014 7:55 am
Can you identify this ant? It has a stinger that looks smaller than a human hair and extends about half its body length. the sting is extremely painful, i have been stung twice. the body is very hard almost like concrete. whats a good and safe way to get rid of these?
Signature: Thank You Tammy Daniel

Velvet Ant

Velvet Ant

Hi Tammy,
Though it resembles an ant and it is called a Velvet Ant, this insect is actually a flightless female wasp in the family Mutillidae and you are correct that the sting is reported to be quite painful.  We cannot say for certain which species this is, but it resembles the members of the genus
Timulla pictured on BugGuide.

Velvet Ant

Velvet Ant

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Ichneumon in Pacific Northwest
Location: Lacey, Washington (Southwestern Washington )
June 30, 2014 6:33 pm
Hello,
I used whatsthatbug.com to identify some new visitors to my front yard. After finding in your 2008 archives what appears to be the same wasp as I have, I would like to share some photos with you to share if you wish.
Signature: Lisa

Unidentified Ichneumon

Unidentified Ichneumon

Dear Lisa,
Thank you for sending additional images of this still unidentified Ichneumon from the Pacific Northwest.

Unidentified Ichneumon

Unidentified Ichneumon

Unidentified Ichneumon

Unidentified Ichneumon

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination