Currently viewing the category: "Wasps and Hornets"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Unusual Metallic Wasp?
Location: San Juan Islands, WA USA
April 26, 2014 9:49 am
This guy was hanging out on my front steps in March. I’ve never seen anything quite like it. The wings were silver, metallic, and shiny, the head was yellow and feathery or dusty looking. It looked wasp-like. It seemed unresponsive, might have been dead. It was about 1-2 inches long.
Signature: Scarlett

Hymenopteran

Hymenopteran

Hi Scarlett,
We are posting your image and letter while we continue to researching the identity of this Hymenopteran, a member of the order that includes wasps, bees and sawflies.

Request to Eric Eaton
Hi Eric,
This looks like a Sawfly to me, but I cannot find its identity.  Any
thoughts?
Thanks
Daniel

Eric Eaton Responds
Daniel:
Good call.  It is indeed a sawfly, likely a species of Dolerus, almost completely covered in flower pollen.
Eric

Ed. Note:  See BugGuide for information on Dolerus Sawflies.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: caterpillars taking over vine
Location: Louisiana
April 27, 2014 7:27 pm
I have recently begun renovation on an old industrial lot and have been trying to identify many of the plant species that have taken over. I am a novice, so I’m not even sure what the vine is, my guess is morning glory. upon my visit to the lot today I have observed an abundance of an orange headed caterpillar eating away at it. There are very many of these, but they are isolated to one vine. I would greatly appreciate assistance in identifying them as I have great curiosity about the ecosystem in new Orleans, Louisiana. I have taken this photo today, April 27.
Signature: the curious prancing unicorn

Sawfly Larvae

Sawfly Larvae3

Hi curious prancing unicorn,
These are not caterpillars.  They are the larvae of Sawflies, and your mistake is a common error.  Without knowing the species of plant they were feeding upon, it might be difficult to correctly identify these Sawfly Larvae to the species level, but they do resemble this image of Birch Sawflies from BugGuide, so we believe they are in the family Argidae.  You can browse through the images on BugGuide to see if you can find a good match.

Sawfly Larvae

Sawfly Larvae

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Blue legged Mystery
Location: Andover, NJ
April 26, 2014 8:48 am
Hoping you can help me with yet another mystery. I found this wasp-like insect on a service berry bush this morning. It was climbing around on the buds but did not appear to be gathering food, although it was quite active. It was very small, around 1/3 inch in length. I am wondering if it a newly emerged wasp or bee of some sort?
Signature: Deborah Bifulco

Webspinning Sawfly

Webspinning Sawfly

Hi Deborah,
There are not too many images available online of your insect, a Webspinning Sawfly,
Pamphilius semicinctus, and your images are among the best.  Though BugGuide has three images, there is no species specific information available, but there is some information on the family Pamphiliidae on BugGuide, including:  “Adults have many-segmented antennae” and “larvae spin webs in a variety of woody plants where they feed on foliage.”  Since you observed your individual on Serviceberry, that might be a good indication that it is the host plant.  Watch for the larvae forming webs, and if you happen to observe them, please take some images and send them our way so we can update this posting, which is a new species for our site.

Webspinning Sawfly

Webspinning Sawfly

Webspinning Sawfly

Webspinning Sawfly

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: what is this bug? a kind of Fly?
Location: Saudi Arabia_Madinah
April 21, 2014 8:45 am
Can you please identify this bug?
I’ve found it sitting on a leaf, in the morning in 21/4/2014.
I couldn’t take any pictures, except for this one.
and thank you.
Signature: M.A

Possibly a Sawfly

Unknown Wasp

Dear M.A.,
We wish your image had more detail.  At first we thought this might be a Fly in the order Diptera, but the antennae look decidedly unflylike.  We now believe this is a Hymenopteran, the order that includes bees and wasps, and we believe it might be a Sawfly.  We wish we were able to tell if there is one pair of wings or two pairs.  Perhaps one of our readers will be able to assist in this identification.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: what’s this bug?
Location: southern california
April 20, 2014 6:25 pm
i’ve seen this bug 3 or 4 times while hiking dirt trails in the san gabriel mountains in southern california, in this month of april it’s a fast mover, approximately one-half inch long, and doesn’t seem to be hostile…seemed more intent on running away from anything put in it’s path. the actual red is very deep but i lightened the picture to help bring out detail…..
Signature: john roush

Red Haired Velvet Ant

Red Haired Velvet Ant

Dear John,
We posted another image of a Red Haired Velvet Ant,
Dasymutilla aureola, earlier today, but the critter was rather small in the digital file, and though we requested a higher resolution image, it was not available.  This makes your submission even more desirable today.  Velvet Ants are actually flightless female wasps.  Do not try to handle a Velvet Ant as you will most likely be surprised by a very painful sting.  We have heard that Velvet Ants are capable of stinging through garden gloves.

Thank you for the information on the Red Haired Velvet Ant!!       Feel free to use the photo i submitted…..    john roush

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Red Haired Velvet Ant
Location: Peachy Canyon, Paso Robles, California
April 18, 2014
hello, what’s that bug? !
i know what this is called and saw it in Peachy Canyon, Paso Robles, CA.
in “California Insects”, (Powell and Hogue) it is described as, “It is one of our commonest species, ranging widely in the Coastal Ranges”. however, i have only seen two before. do you think they are less common now?
thank you,
clare

Red Haired Velvet Ant

Red Haired Velvet Ant

Thanks for the image Clare.  Do you have a larger file?  According to BugGuide, the Red Haired Velvet Ant is Dasymutilla aureola, and it is reported from California and Oregon.

Red Haired Velvet Ant:  Larger file

Red Haired Velvet Ant: Larger file

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination