Currently viewing the category: "Wasps and Hornets"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Backyard Wasp
Location: West Virginia
June 9, 2014 8:42 pm
Can you please help identify this bug? Thank you!
Signature: Bob Escargot

Male Stump Stabbers await emergence of female

Male Stump Stabbers await emergence of female

Dear Bob,
What a wonderful image you have provided.  These are male Giant Ichneumons in the genus
Megarhyssa, and females of the genus are commonly called Stump Stabbers because of the way they use a lengthy ovipositor, sometimes as long as five inches, to lay eggs beneath the surface of dead or dying trees or branches.  That wood is infested with the wood boring larvae of Wood Wasps like the Pigeon Horntail, and the larval Ichneumons feed on the larval Wood Wasps.  We believe these males are awaiting the emergence of a virgin female who has begun to release pheromones as she makes her way back to the surface so that they can mate.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this?
Location: UK
June 4, 2014 10:24 am
My friend found it on his lampshade. Ughhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh
Signature: Don’t really care.

Tarantula Hawk???

Tarantula Hawk???

Dear Don’t really care,
We thought this resembled a Tarantula Hawk, but we couldn’t figure out why it was sighted in the UK, so we contacted Eric Eaton.  His reply is posted below.  Can you provide any additional details regarding the sighting?  Did your friend recently receive any packages from abroad?

Eric Eaton’s Response
Definitely a pompilid (spider wasp), and it looks like Hemipepsis or Pepsis.  I’d be curious to know the circumstances under which it was found.  It is probably a stowaway in a shipment from the southwest U.S. or Central or South America.
Eric

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Can’t identify this insect
Location: Derbyshire5
June 3, 2014 8:51 am
Spotted the other day on a seat at creswell crags I n Derbyshire. Just curious to find out what it is if you can help
Signature: John

European Hornet

European Hornet

Hi John,
This is a European Hornet,
Vespa crabro, and we believe this is a queen gathering wood pulp for her nest.  Soon, when her first generation of workers are able to leave the nest, she will remain in the nest and produce more eggs.  We found a fascinating website called Hornets: Gentle Giants that you might enjoy reading.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: This is the Stuff of Nightmares
Location: Boquete, Panama
June 1, 2014 8:12 am
Hi Bugman!
I live in Boquete, Panama and found this nest in the tree outside my house. I know that insects are fun and interesting, but the sight of this nest gives me the creeps. Can you tell me what kind of creature builds such a nest and feels that they can hang out by my porch like they own the place?
Signature: ~Cate

Hornet Nest

Hornet Nest

Hi Cate,
This appears to be a Hornet Nest, but we cannot make out individual insects well enough in your image to provide an exact identification.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Kern River fuzzy bug
Location: Kernville, CA (campsite near kern river)
May 31, 2014 6:30 pm
We saw this little guy in the sand at our campsite at the Kern River today (June 1st, 2014).
We only counted 6 legs at the time.
Signature: Kristen

Velvet Ant

Velvet Ant

Hi Kristen,
This is a Velvet Ant in the genus
Dasymutilla, and we believe it might be Dasymutilla sackenii based on the images posted to BugGuide.  Velvet Ants should be handled with extreme caution since they are actually flightless female wasps reputed to have a very painful sting.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this?
Location: NE Ohio Ashtabula county
May 30, 2014 4:06 am
Bugman,
We saw this May 29, 2014 in our back field. It was about 2 inches long, large black wings, one big yellow spot on back. The last segment of each leg was yellow and the antenna were yellow as well. It looks very similar to the digger wasp scolia dubia but it was larger and only one spot on its back. It flew very slowly landed on a leaf and wrapped the two mid legs around the leaf.
Thanks for any help
Signature: Judy

Elm Sawfly

Elm Sawfly

Dear Judy,
Mistaking this Elm Sawfly for a wasp is understandable, since wasps and Sawflies are in the same insect order, but unlike wasps, Sawflies do not sting.  The abdominal markings can vary, but your individual looks very close to this image on BugGuide.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination