Currently viewing the category: "Wasps and Hornets"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Unknown bug ….to me!
Location: See letter above:  Tootgarook on the Mornington Peninsula, Victoria, Australia
November 30, 2013 10:54 pm
Hi, my name is Annie. On November 28, 2013 , at 3.50 pm, I noticed this bug on my plant. I have never seen it before and some research work came up with nothing similar at all. I posted a photo on Instagram in the hope someone could tell me, but so far no one does, even though several people have joint me in the research, lol! The back part of its body is bright yellow and black, and it appears to have some water blisters on it’s back., not rain drops as it was a dry and sunny day. The front part of its body is a reddish-dark brown and shiny, it has hairs all over its legs and upper body, and it reared up as in self-defence when I came closer. This bug was found in my garden in Tootgarook on the Mornington Peninsula, Victoria, Australia . The photo I included is taken with a zoom lens, and is pretty much enlarged to its full capacity. Hope it is still good enough for you to identify this bug, lol! Thank you so much for your willingness to look into this kind of things, it is quite fascinating to get to know bugs better!
Kind regards: Annie.
Signature: Annie J Den Boer

Flightless Female Flower Wasp:  Thynnus species

Flightless Female Flower Wasp: Thynnus species

Dear Annie,
We have several similar images in our archives very similar to this creature, and in 2010, we did significant research and we thought we had identified a photo as a Flightless Female Flower Wasp,
Thynnus apterus.  We are not entirely certain the species is correct, but we are relatively confident with the genus.  Today we found a photo of a mounted pair of Thynnus brenchleyi on the Agriculture of Western Australia website that confirms the genus, if not the species.  There is no female Thynnus apterus pictured on Agriculture of Western Australia.

Dear Daniel.
Thank you so very much for this quick reply! I think the two compare well, although I have to admit that the one I photographed has more and also brighter yellow on the top of its back, but that could possibly have to do with age and/or variety, and quality of the photo!
I am very happy to be able to let this student in America know and tell him your website and the one of Agriculture of Western Australia, so he can have a look for himself.
Again, thank you so very much for your help, it is much appreciated,
With kind regards: Annie j Den Boer.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: what is this insect
Location: ms
November 27, 2013 5:48 pm
Please help me
Signature: kasie dickerson

Stump Stabber

Stump Stabber

Dear kasie,
This Giant Ichnuemon in the genus
Megarhyssa is commonly called a Stump Stabber because of the method employed by the female when laying eggs.

Update:  April 8, 2014
We are frequently asked if Giant Ichneumons can sting, and we always reply that they cannot.  We just found a fascinating article.  According to Icheumon Wasps by Lloyd Eighme on Skagit.wsu:  “It might frighten you, but if you could watch it long enough you would be amazed at what it does. It lands on the bark of a tree and crawls up and down, tapping with its long antennae, obviously searching for something. Eventually it finds the spot it is looking for and begins to drill into the bark with its long needle-like ovipositor. It has detected the larva of a horntail wasp chewing its tunnel in the wood an inch or more below the surface of the bark. The ovipositor is made up of three stiff threads, hardened by minerals, that fit together with a groove in the center. Vibrating those sharppointed threads forces them into the bark and sapwood of the tree to contact the horntail grub in its tunnel. An egg is forced down the ovipositor to parasitize the grub. If the ichneumon parasite larva killed its host, they would both die, trapped in the solid wood which the parasite is unable to chew. It only feeds on the nonvital organs like the fat body until its host has nearly completed its life cycle and has chewed its way out near the surface of the bark. Then it kills and consumes its host grub and completes its own life cycle to emerge as another giant ichneumon wasp in the genus Megarhyssa (mega=large; rhyssa=tail) to start over again. You can see both Megarhyssa and its horntail wasp host in the MG collection.
People often ask if the ichneumon wasps will sting them with their needle-like ovipositors. The wasps are interested only in laying eggs in caterpillars or other insects, but if you handle a live one it may try to sting you in self-defense. Small ones could not likely penetrate your skin, but larger ones might be able to

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What Is It?
Location: Goderich, Ontario, Canada
November 18, 2013 8:52 am
I found this little one on the side of the house. It was about 1 cm long.
Signature: Dale

Flightless Ichneumon:  Gelis species

Flightless Ichneumon: Gelis species

Dear Dale,
We were immediately excited upon viewing your photo.  We knew that though this looked like an ant, it is more likely a parasitic wasp and judging by the ovipositor, that the individual is female.  We quickly discovered the genus
Gelis on BugGuide where we found this matching photo.  According to BugGuide:  “Many species of Gelis are wingless. Habits are diverse. Many are external parasites of Lepidoptera in cocoons, others are parasitic on Symphyta, spiders, Diptera larvae and pupae, or wood-boring Coleoptera larvae. Many are Hyperparasites.”   This is news to us as we did not realize there were wingless Ichneumons.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: black long legs big head beetle?
Location: Miami Florida
November 14, 2013 9:26 pm
Dear whats that bug,
I just found this visitor in our bathroom in the morning in November in Miami Florida.
Is not as beautiful as other bugs that i see in this website but I am just move by curiosity.
I could not found any picture online exactly as this guy . I think is a beetle
I took the pic with my cell phone and the animal was very high in the wall so i couldn’t get closer.
Thank you in advance
Signature: vlad

Ensign Wasp

Ensign Wasp

Dear Vlad,
This is an Ensign Wasp, and you should probably welcome it into your home.  The female Ensign Wasp parasitizes the ootheca or egg case of a Cockroach, and the developing Ensign Wasp larva feeds upon the eggs and developing Cockroaches, helping to control the population of an insect that very few people, even the most tolerant, will relish having in their homes.

Dear Daniel Marlos,
Thank you for your fast reply. I need to work in my id skills! Good that I leave it alone as I normally do with insects (with the exception of cockroaches).
Vlad

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: we didnt know what this was?
Location: Selby, North Yorkshire, England
November 12, 2013 10:49 am
we found it on a window in college on the 12 of November 2013 and we have no idea what this is,people were afraid because of the sting on it!! but i managed to get a close photo of it please get back soon
Signature: however you prefer

Ichneumon

Ichneumon

This is some species of Parasitic Hymenopteran, most likely an Ichneumon.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Wasp sp.?
Location: Sequoia NP, California
November 11, 2013 12:40 pm
I took this photo, in Sequoia NP, California, completely by accident! I was trying to photograph the Butterfly! Does anyone know which species of Wasp it is?
Signature: GaryT

Sand Wasp

Sand Wasp

Hi GaryT,
This appears to be a Sand Wasp in the tribe Bembicini, but we are uncertain of the species.  It appears to us to resemble members of the genus
Steniolia that are pictured on BugGuide.

Thank you very much for your really quick response. This at least gives me a starting point to look a bit deeper.
Thanks again

Let us know if you get a more specific identification and we can update the posting.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination