Currently viewing the category: "Wasps and Hornets"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: bugs nest
Location: Miami,Florida
July 29, 2015 10:27 am
Please help me figure out what this is.
Signature: Tiffany

Mud Dauber Nest

Mud Dauber Nest

Dear Tiffany,
This is the nest of a Mud Dauber, a solitary wasp that builds a nest of mud that is comprised of numerous cells provisioned with paralyzed spiders.  Each cell contains a single egg.  By the look of your nest, the adult Mud Daubers have already emerged to forage, pollinate flowers and possibly begin building a new generation of mud nests in sheltered locations, often in the corners of windows and under eaves.  Mud Daubers are not an aggressive species that can often be found collecting mud in gardens and other areas that are watered.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: what is this big insect?
Location: Comox VAlley, Vancouver Island
July 29, 2015 11:31 pm
Dear bugman, this insect came buzzed by us this evening, July 29, 2015. It is the biggest I have seen yet in Southern Coastal BC. We live on the East Coast of Vancouver Island, in the Comox Valley. Our house is by a creek in a semi-forested, green belt area which gives us great opportunity for observation of our flora and fauna. This insect flew by slowly, at first I thought it was a juvenile hummingbird or huge moth. It made no sound other than with its wings when it was flying and did not move very fast. In fact it was still most of the time. I took many pictures, most of them not very sharp. I picked the best ones and hope you can help me figure out what it is that was visiting us. Is it a cicada? a cicada eater? It has stripes on its abdomen, like a wasp. It has those short club-like antennae that remind me of a fly. It has a very small head relative to its body, and is antennae and the outer portions of its legs are yellow.
Signature: Monika on Morrison Creek

Elm Sawfly

Elm Sawfly

Dear Monika,
This Elm Sawfly is a non-stinging member of the insect order that includes Wasps and Bees.  The larvae of the Elm Sawfly are frequently confused for caterpillars.

Elm Sawfly

Elm Sawfly

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Large insect with wasp prey
Location: West coast of British Columbia
July 29, 2015 3:43 pm
I took these photos on July 29/15 in the town of Nanaimo, on the west coast of British Columbia. This awesome creature was on a salal leaf, in a dry forest of Douglas fir, hemlock, and arbutus. I wanted to get a side view shot as well, but it must have been bothered by my intrusion into its juicy meal, and flew away. Can you tell what species it is? I think I’ve narrowed it down to the Laphria genus, Robber flies.
Thanks a lot. Love your site!
Signature: John Segal

Bee-Like Robber Fly eats Yellowjacket

Bee-Like Robber Fly eats Yellowjacket

Dear John,
Because of the thick antennae that helps to identify the genus, we agree that this is a Bee-Like Robber Fly in the genus
Laphria, and after searching through 10 pages of species on BugGuide, we have narrowed down the possibilities to five species that have yellow thoracic hair and that generally resemble your individual, which appears to be feeding on a Yellowjacket based on this facial closeup on BugGuide.    The abdomen on Laphria fernaldi appears too orange to be your species.  In alphabetical order, the most similar looking species on BugGuide are:  Laphria astur Laphria janusLaphria partitor and Laphria unicolor.  Of those, we believe the images of Laphria astur on BugGuide look the closest, but we are by no means experts in the identification of Robber Flies.  Thanks for your excellent Food Chain contribution, and in the future, we can accept larger digital files to ensure the highest quality of the images on our site.

Bee-Like Robber Fly eats Yellow Jacket

Bee-Like Robber Fly eats Yellowjacket

Hi Daniel,
Thanks very much for helping me identify an insect I’ve never seen before.  I really appreciate it.
Those photos are about 650 X 450 KB; the size I use for email. Let me know if you’d like me to send them again, as larger files, and what the maximum size is that you can receive.
Thanks again.  Excellent website you have there!
John

Hi John,
We can easily accept 5MB files.  We are then able to crop into details like the antennae on this Bee-Like Robber Fly.  You may send them larger and we will crop to some details.

Hi Daniel,
Great! Okay, here are my two photos, each about 1.7 MB.
Thanks again for your great website, and all the work you do for us bug-curious types!
John

Bee-Like Robber Fly eats Yellowjacket

Bee-Like Robber Fly eats Yellowjacket

Thanks for sending the higher resolution files.  Since you already cropped the images the first time, we were not able to magnify much more, but we did move a bit closer.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: A beautiful type of wasp?
Location: Phoenix arizona
July 28, 2015 6:02 pm
I found this awesome little dude in my laundry room and I’m dying to know what they are.
Signature: Brooke c

Western Cicada Killer

Western Cicada Killer

Dear Brooke,
This positively gorgeous wasp is a Western Cicada Killer,
Specius grandis.  Though Cicada Killers are not aggressive and we have not gotten any legitimate documentation of a person being stung by a Cicada Killer, the possibility does exist and we imagine a person might be stung if carelessly handling a Cicada Killer.  We get many more identification requests for the Eastern Cicada Killer, and images of Western Cicada Killers are not too common in our archives.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: what kind of wasp is this?
Location: Kingston,NH
July 27, 2015 11:06 am
I live in NH and saw this bee and thought it looked strange. I’m not sure if they are native to this area but i have been seeing them the past two years. Please, help me identify this bug.
Thank you.
Signature: Wendy

Great Golden Digger Wasp

Great Golden Digger Wasp

Dear Wendy,
The Great Golden Digger Wasp, Sphex ichneumoneus, is native throughout North America and if you have had a sudden increase in populations, we suspect it has something to do with food supplies.  Adult Great Golden Digger Wasps are pollinators, and in our own garden, they are very fond of the flowers of onions, but we have also seen them visit the blossoms of carrots, so we suspect they are also attracted to other plants with umbel blooms.  The female digs a nest that she provisions with paralyzed Katydids, Crickets and other longhorned Orthopterans which provide food for the larvae.  Years when Katydids are especially plentiful will likely result in more Great Golden Digger Wasps.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Fly or wasp
Location: NT22217222
July 27, 2015 11:48 am
Picture taken 25th June 2015.
Abdomen and thorax colouring of Chrysidid wasp, head of a fly?
Any help with ID would be greatly appreciated.
Cheers,
Signature: Stevie in Edinburgh

Cuckoo Wasp

Cuckoo Wasp

Dear Stevie,
We believe the similarity to the head of a fly in your image is an illusion, and that your Cuckoo Wasp is
Chrysis ignita which is pictured on BWARS where it states the species is found:  “Throughout England,Wales, Scotland and Ireland but not found on the Orkney and Shetland Islands. Recorded from the Isle of Man, Isle of Wight, the Isles of Scilly and the Channel Islands.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination