Currently viewing the category: "Wasps and Hornets"
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Subject: European Hornet, I think
Location: Bucks County, PA (In my car!)
May 13, 2014 7:34 pm
Hi there bug man!
Today I found this huge bug in my car. It couldn’t make it’s way out and people in the parking lot were gathered round with various solutions. Unfortunatly, it finally balled up and died. It looks like it was nesting in the door of my car. I’ve sent pictures and video. Sorry for the comentary but it freaked me out. Never saw one before! Could you tell me if I have identified this bug correctly? Thanks so much!
Signature: Judy “freaked-out” Sawyer

European Hornet

European Hornet

Dear Judy,
We agree that this is a European Hornet,
Vespa crabro, but we do not believe it was attempting to nest in your car.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Hornet nest
Location: Anniston, AL
May 13, 2014 11:07 am
Found one just getting started under my eaves.
Signature: Rick

Hornet Nest

Hornet Nest

Hi Rick,
Thank you for sending this image of what is most likely a queen Bald Faced Hornet beginning to construct her nest.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Parasite chain!
Location: Israel
May 13, 2014 4:09 am
Hi Bug people!
My son and I were witness to a great story unfolding a few days ago. It started with someone eating my son’s colrabi plants, and upon close inspection we collected several cabbage white caterpillars and put them in a large glass jar, along with a few cabbage leaves (from the store but they didn’t complain), and covered with gauze.
Within a couple days, the caterpillars (all of them) climbed up the sides of the jar, anchored themselves to the glass, and died. Numerous small yellow maggots emerged from each one and pupated, so each corpse was surrounded by what looked like yellow woolly rice.
We took some pictures and waited a few more days, and walla! Wasps! (I’m guessing braconids of some sort, but I can’t be sure).
The colrabi – caterpillar – wasp cycle was complete!
I’m attaching some of the pictures so you and your viewers can enjoy.
Signature: Ben, from Israel

Cabbage White with Wasp Pupae

Cabbage White with Wasp Pupae

Hi Ben,
Thanks for sending us these wonderful images of the life cycle of a Parasitic Wasp.  We cannot say for certain what family of Parasitoids this wasp is classified into.  We located an image on Visuals Unlimited of a similarly parasitized Cabbage White Caterpillar, and the parasitoid is identified as
Cotesia glomerata.  Cotesia glomerata is classified as a Braconid on BugGuide, and the adult wasp pictured on BugGuide also looks like your individual, so we are concluding that you are most likely correct.

Parasitic Wasp

Parasitic Wasp

Parasitic Wasps

Parasitic Wasps

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: some sort of hornet?
Location: Missouri, United States
May 10, 2014 8:16 pm
lately I’ve been flipping over old rotten wood pieces and finding a hornet like this nestled into the wood. I don’t see these flying around or anything and they don’t look like any hornet I’ve googled, so I was hoping you could help out!
Signature: Stolz

Southern Yellowjacket Queen

Southern Yellowjacket Queen

Dear Stolz,
This is a Southern Yellowjacket,
Vespula squamosa, and we believe it is a queen whose winter hibernation you have interrupted. According to BugGuide:  “Queens are facultative temporary social parasites, and frequently usurp established young nests of other yellowjacket species, usually V. maculifrons. There are also records of this species utilizing V. vidua and V. flavopilosa as hosts. The queens are extremely large and robust for a yellowjacket, a trait which surely helps them to overpower and kill the host queens of the colonies they usurp. A study in Georgia found that about 80% of V. squamosa colonies began by usurpation of a V. maculifrons colony. Facultative temporary social parasitism means that the species may parasitize other species, but is still capable of founding its own colonies, and it retains a worker caste. After killing the host queen, the squamosa adopts the nest and host workers, who raise her offspring. The colony eventually becomes pure squamosa as the original host workers die off.”  BugGuide also states:  “This species emerges in spring later than its frequent host, Vespula maculifrons, so that there are numerous young colonies available for usurpation.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: looks like huge ant with yellow and black colors
Location: Israel
May 6, 2014 1:43 am
Hi,
Found this bug (image attached), looks like ant, big ant, with
black back and yellow dots, bee colors.
called it bant :)
Did you see something like this before?
Signature: Best Regards, Tarik Haddad

Velvet Ant

Velvet Ant

Hi again Tarik,
Sorry about the very short reply yesterday.  We were late.  This is a Velvet Ant, a flightless female wasp, and North American relatives are reported to have a very painful sting, so we imagine the same is true of the Israeli species.  Velvet Ants often have bright warning coloration, known as aposematic coloration, to warn people and predators to leave them alone.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Black and Orange ?
Location: Claremont & Upland California
May 3, 2014 10:39 am
Area found Claremont and Upland, Ca
Found in April and May 2014
One was about 1/2 the size of a dragonfly and the other was a little over 1 ” long.
25 years of gardening and I have never seen this bug, any idea what it is?
Signature: Dee

Spider Wasp

Spider Wasp

Hi Dee,
This is a Spider Wasp in the family Pompilidae, and it appears to be a small Tarantula Hawk.
  You can see some examples on BugGuide that are classified in the genera Hemipepsis and Pepsis.  The female Tarantula Hawk preys upon Tarantulas and other large spiders including Trapdoor Spiders, not to eat, but to feed her young.  The Tarantula is paralyzed and buried with a single egg.  When the larval wasp hatches, it feeds on the fresh meet of the living, but paralyzed Tarantula.  Adult Tarantula Hawks are nectar feeders, and the sting is reported to be quite painful.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination