Currently viewing the category: "Wasps and Hornets"
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Subject: wasp ?
Location: Amherst Nova Scotia Canada
May 23, 2014 5:45 pm
I took this picture May 22 2014 on our front deck, I have tried to identify this insect but cannot
Signature: Charles W Linney

Mason Wasp

Mason Wasp

Hi Charles,
This is a Mason Wasp or Potter Wasp in the family Eumeninae.  We are having trouble identifying it to the species level since so many species and genera look so similar, so we will leave that to an expert.  Members of the family, according to BugGuide:  “prey mainly upon moth larvae” and they provision their nests with the caterpillars to provide food for the developing larval wasps.  The nests often resemble small ceramic pots and they are constructed of mud.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Fairy Disguised As Bug?
Location: Massachusetts
May 20, 2014 9:25 am
Though I am a thirty one year old adult I often try to keep the “fantastic” alive in my imagination. As I was contemplating the *finally* nice weather in Massachusetts, (it is nearing the end of May) I began to daydream falling leaves and flying dandelion seeds as fairies in disguise. When I was interrupted by technology, (iPhone alert) I looked down and this little guy was chilling out on my phone. His wings were delicate and lacey, like a cicada’s, and his face was that of an ant’s, pinchers and all. His head turned like a praying mantis, and as I was taking a picture, it tilted it’s head up and looked right at me! It was this, sort of intelligent maneuver, that made me giggle at the idea – hey, perhaps this is a fairy in disguise! I have looked for two hours on the Internet to try and identify my ephemeral friend, to no avail. Please help! I’d really like to know what kind of big this is!
Signature: Liz

Sawfly

Sawfly

Hi Liz,
We hate to dissipate the illusion that the spring day helped to create regarding your interaction with this insect, but we believe, despite the blurriness of the image, that we have properly identified it as a Sawfly.  It resembles this Conifer Sawfly in the genus
Neodiprion that is posted to bugGuide.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Strange bug with long sting
Location: Hungary, Fót
May 20, 2014 6:27 am
Dear Bugman!
I have found this strange bug in my friend’s house in Fót, a small town near Budapest the capital of Hungary.
Sadly he has killed it, and took it’s head off for it to not suffer.
He was scared that it might be a tropical mosquito which came with a shipment of bananas.
Could you please tell me, what kind of bug is this, and if it’s any dangerous?
Signature: Tom

Ichneumon

Ichneumon

Dear Tom,
This is a parasitic wasp, most likely an Ichneumon, and though it is quite frightening, Ichneumons are not aggressive and they do not attempt to sting humans.  What appears to be a stinger is actually an ovipositor, an organ that has evolved so that the female can deposit her eggs where they will hatch and the developing larva will have access to a food supply.  Your individual resembles the North American Stump Stabbers in the genus
Megarhyssa, and the female wasp uses her ovipositor to deposit eggs in stumps and branches that are infested with wood boring larvae of Wood Wasps known as Pigeon Horntails as the larvae of the Pigeon Horntail is the sole food of the larvae of the Stump Stabber.  Your Ichneumon looks very similar to this Perithous species that is pictured on FlickR.  Alas, the folks who post to FlickR never seem to provide a location for their images.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: European Hornet, I think
Location: Bucks County, PA (In my car!)
May 13, 2014 7:34 pm
Hi there bug man!
Today I found this huge bug in my car. It couldn’t make it’s way out and people in the parking lot were gathered round with various solutions. Unfortunatly, it finally balled up and died. It looks like it was nesting in the door of my car. I’ve sent pictures and video. Sorry for the comentary but it freaked me out. Never saw one before! Could you tell me if I have identified this bug correctly? Thanks so much!
Signature: Judy “freaked-out” Sawyer

European Hornet

European Hornet

Dear Judy,
We agree that this is a European Hornet,
Vespa crabro, but we do not believe it was attempting to nest in your car.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Hornet nest
Location: Anniston, AL
May 13, 2014 11:07 am
Found one just getting started under my eaves.
Signature: Rick

Hornet Nest

Hornet Nest

Hi Rick,
Thank you for sending this image of what is most likely a queen Bald Faced Hornet beginning to construct her nest.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Parasite chain!
Location: Israel
May 13, 2014 4:09 am
Hi Bug people!
My son and I were witness to a great story unfolding a few days ago. It started with someone eating my son’s colrabi plants, and upon close inspection we collected several cabbage white caterpillars and put them in a large glass jar, along with a few cabbage leaves (from the store but they didn’t complain), and covered with gauze.
Within a couple days, the caterpillars (all of them) climbed up the sides of the jar, anchored themselves to the glass, and died. Numerous small yellow maggots emerged from each one and pupated, so each corpse was surrounded by what looked like yellow woolly rice.
We took some pictures and waited a few more days, and walla! Wasps! (I’m guessing braconids of some sort, but I can’t be sure).
The colrabi – caterpillar – wasp cycle was complete!
I’m attaching some of the pictures so you and your viewers can enjoy.
Signature: Ben, from Israel

Cabbage White with Wasp Pupae

Cabbage White with Wasp Pupae

Hi Ben,
Thanks for sending us these wonderful images of the life cycle of a Parasitic Wasp.  We cannot say for certain what family of Parasitoids this wasp is classified into.  We located an image on Visuals Unlimited of a similarly parasitized Cabbage White Caterpillar, and the parasitoid is identified as
Cotesia glomerata.  Cotesia glomerata is classified as a Braconid on BugGuide, and the adult wasp pictured on BugGuide also looks like your individual, so we are concluding that you are most likely correct.

Parasitic Wasp

Parasitic Wasp

Parasitic Wasps

Parasitic Wasps

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination