Currently viewing the category: "Wasps and Hornets"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Giant wasp
Location: Middle of, Ontario canada
August 24, 2015 10:16 am
Can you identify this bug?
Signature: I dont know what this means

Pigeon Horntail

Pigeon Horntail

This is a Pigeon Horntail, a species of Wood Wasp.  The female uses her ovipositor to lay eggs beneath the bark of unhealthy trees.  Pigeon Horntails do not sting.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Red looking ant, no fuzz
Location: Ct
August 21, 2015 12:58 pm
Found a few of these near my sons sandbox and wondering if they sting.
Signature: Allison

Velvet Ant

Velvet Ant

Dear Allison,
This is a Velvet Ant, a flightless female wasp and they do sting, and the sting is reported to be painful, but not dangerous.  There are many similar looking species and this looks like it might be  
Dasymutilla gibbosa based on this BugGuide image.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Possible stink bug eating red caterpillar
Location: Livingston County, MI
August 22, 2015 8:26 pm
Found this hanging off a leaf in a meadow behind my house. I think the bug is some sort of stinkbug but I have not been able to find a match online. No idea on the caterpillar type.
Signature: Cheryl E.

Predatory Stink Bug Nymph eats Sawfly Larva

Predatory Stink Bug Nymph eats Sawfly Larva

Dear Cheryl,
This is a Predatory Stink Bug nymph, possibly in the genus
Apoecilus based on this BugGuide image, but it is not feeding on a caterpillar.  The prey is a Sawfly larva in the family Argidae, and we have a visual match to Arge coccinea thanks to this BugGuide image.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this
Location: Hardyville Kentucky
August 19, 2015 6:43 pm
These have been gathering in my backyard in the mornings. Seems that they are after the dew on the grass. I first thought they were dirt dobbers but I saw a few just chilling on my fence this afternoon and this is the picture. Thanks
Signature: Cheryl

Digger Wasp

Digger Wasp

Dear Cheryl,
We are pleased to see your image of a living Digger Wasp,
Scolia dubia, and to read your positive attitude about it because these docile, solitary wasps are frequently targeted for Unnecessary Carnage like the dead Digger Wasp we posted a few days back.  The female Digger Wasp lays her eggs on subterranean beetle grubs including the invasive Japanese Beetle, so Digger Wasps are a gardener’s friend.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Black and Red Ant-like bug
Location: Eastern Shore Va., Assawoman
August 21, 2015 7:59 am
Eastern Shore of Va….this bug was in my yard….followed it across the small backyard where it disappeared into a grassy clump…no flying, it just crawled…I’m curious about it as the colors seem to shout “don’t touch me”….and I have pets in that area….any help would be appreciated…
Signature: Kathy M.

Cow Killer

Cow Killer

Dear Kathy,
The aposomatic or warning coloration on this Cow Killer, a species of Velvet Ant is doing its job.  The Cow Killer is reported to have a very painful sting, prompting us to include it in our Big 5 tag of insects that can cause pain or harm.  Velvet Ants are actually flightless female wasps.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Wasp
Location: Pennsylvania
August 19, 2015 1:51 pm
We have these wasp in our yard think they have a nest underground how do we know for sure and get rid of it
Signature: Sharon

Digger Wasp

Digger Wasp

Dear Sharon,
This is a solitary Digger Wasp,
Scolia dubia, and it is not an aggressive species.  They develop underground, but they are not social wasps with hundreds of members of a colony.  According to BugGuide:  “Males and females have a courtship dance, flying close to the ground in a figure-8 or S pattern. Females burrow into ground in search of grubs, especially those of Cotinis and Popillia japonica. She stings it and often burrows farther down, then constructs a cell and lays an egg on the host. Larva pupates and overwinters in a cocoon within the body of the host. One generation per year in North, more in South.”  Any insect that preys on the invasive Japanese Beetle is a friend to the gardener.  We do not provide extermination advice.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination