Currently viewing the category: "Wasps and Hornets"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Flying Scorpion? Panorpa nuptialis?
Location: Fort Collins, CO
August 22, 2014 2:30 pm
I found this yesterday in an old pot.
Live in Fort Collins, CO.
I am afraid I killed it, even though it bothered me to do so, but it looked somewhat dangerous!
Have never seen anything like this! A friend in Mexico sent me news of Panorpa nuptialis… “flying scorpion” but I am not sure it is enough similar…
Ideas?
Signature: mes

American Pelecinid

American Pelecinid

Dear mes,
This is an American Pelecinid,
Pelecinus polyturator, the only member of its family in the continental United States.  This parasitic wasp uses its long abdomen to deposit eggs underground in the proximity of Scarab Beetle Grubs which the larval wasps eat.  American Pelecinids are not known to sting, but whenever we write that an insect is harmless, or not aggressive, someone writes in to dispute us.  In our opinion, this beneficial insect was killed unnecessarily, and we are tagging the posting as Unnecessary Carnage and we hope that you will be understanding if you encounter another American Pelecinid.  This is most definitely not a Scorpionfly, which is how Panorpa nuptialis is classified.

THANK YOU for this post, and for the education.
I am generally not squeamish around insects (having lived 17 years of my adult life in Mexico) and I sincerely regret falling into the “ew” category with this American Pelecinid. I was feeling mother bear I think…
Thank you so much for the identification which I will post around to try to atone for having lost this one!
Thanks for the good work you do
Mes

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Spider wasp’s (rescued) victim
August 22, 2014 9:14 am
I saw a wolf spider being attacked by a blue spider wasp today, and I managed to chase away the wasp and rescue the spider. I know some species only temporarily paralyze the victim, and I’ve seen the spider twitch, so…does he have any chance of recovering? I feel bad for intervening, especially since it’s probably too late for the spider, but the poor guy was trying very hard to get away, and I wanted to help him out.
I don’t know what kind exactly the wasp was, but it’s a Michigan variety.
Signature: Kitt

Blue Black Spider Wasp preys upon Wolf Spider (from our archives)

Blue Black Spider Wasp preys upon Wolf Spider (from our archives)

Dear Kitt ,
We have heard of a Tarantula recovering from the sting of a wasp, but the whole purpose of the sting is to paralyze the spider so that it will provide food for the wasp larvae.  We are uncertain if it will recover.  We have illustrated your posting with an image from our archives.

Thanks for responding, and I’m glad you could answer my question. I’ll keep an eye on the spider. who knows? He might recover soon.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Wasp?
Location: Brigantine, New Jersey, USA
August 20, 2014 1:30 pm
Hi,
I wonder if you can help me out with the id of this one?!
Signature: Kristian

European Hornet???

Male Northern Paper Wasp

Hi Kristian,
Though the coloration is dark, especially on the abdomen, this looks like a European Hornet to us.  We have requested a second opinion.
This individual on BugGuide looks darker than most.

Correction Courtesy of Eric Eaton
Hi, Daniel:
Very nice image of a male Northern Paper Wasp, Polistes fuscatus.  A European Hornet would be much bigger, more robust in body shape, but I’ve seen both and the difference is striking to me.  I also don’t know what context or story came with the image.
Eric

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Wasp-like Insect
Location: Central Alabama
August 20, 2014 12:45 pm
Hello. Recently have seen several of these around, esp. near my flowering mint plants. Not sure what they are. I suspect they might sting, but are very docile in nature.
Signature: Wayne

Double Banded Scoliid

Double Banded Scoliid

Dear Wayne,
This beautiful Scarab Hunter or Flower Wasp in the family Scoliidae is commonly called a Double Banded Scoliid,
Scolia bicincta.  As you indicated, they are docile wasps that are solitary in nature.  While we acknowledge that they might sting if the are threatened or carelessly handled, there is very little chance of a sting if they are not bothered.  Scarab Hunter wasps are beneficial insects that help to control the populations of Scarab Beetles.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Stinging flying insect.
Location: Mesa Arizona
August 18, 2014 1:26 pm
I was stung today by these lovely little guys, when I went to insect identification and clicked Arizona, I however was at a loss to find them! The nest is smaller than a baseball and they’re probably only 1 1/2 inches in length (not that I got close enough to measure) I was wondering if you could help my figure out just who’s living in my hedge bush!
Signature: Lynn

Paper Wasp Nest

Paper Wasp Nest

Dear Lynn,
These are Paper Wasps in the genus
Polistes, and they are social wasps that build nests.  Generally, solitary wasps are not aggressive, but social wasps will defend the nest.  With that said, Paper Wasps are not as aggressive as Yellowjackets or Hornets, but they will still defend the nest.  We believe your individuals are Polistes flavus based on images posted to BugGuide.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Any ideas what this is?
Location: Buffalo, NY
August 17, 2014 9:10 pm
Does anyone have a clue what this flying bug is? Not sure if it came from the pine logs I was cutting but it also appears to have a stinger
Signature: Nick

Black and Red Horntail

Black and Red Horntail

Dear Nick,
Though we have no shortage of other Horntails on our site, including the Pigeon Horntail, this is the first example we are posting of a Black and Red Horntail,
Urocerus cressoni.  Horntails are Wood Wasps and the larvae bore in wood of dead and dying trees.  According to BugGuide:  “hosts include Fir, Spruce, and Pine (Abies, Picea, Pinus).”  

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination