Currently viewing the category: "Wasps and Hornets"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Fly or wasp
Location: NT22217222
July 27, 2015 11:48 am
Picture taken 25th June 2015.
Abdomen and thorax colouring of Chrysidid wasp, head of a fly?
Any help with ID would be greatly appreciated.
Cheers,
Signature: Stevie in Edinburgh

Cuckoo Wasp

Cuckoo Wasp

Dear Stevie,
We believe the similarity to the head of a fly in your image is an illusion, and that your Cuckoo Wasp is
Chrysis ignita which is pictured on BWARS where it states the species is found:  “Throughout England,Wales, Scotland and Ireland but not found on the Orkney and Shetland Islands. Recorded from the Isle of Man, Isle of Wight, the Isles of Scilly and the Channel Islands.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: can you identify this insect?
Location: Oakville, Ontario, Canada.
July 26, 2015 5:35 pm
Rescued this insect from my pool. Never seen one like it. First thought is it may be some type of hornet/wasp. It is around 1″ long.
Signature: Danno Cracker

Male Pigeon Horntail

Male Pigeon Horntail

Dear Danno,
We are very excited to post your image of a male Pigeon Horntail, because though we have numerous images of female Pigeon Horntails on our site, there is a noticeable dearth of images of male individuals.  Female Pigeon Horntails have a long stingerlike ovipositor that is used to lay eggs in the wood of dead and dying trees, and males lack the ovipositor.  We compared your image to that of a male Pigeon Horntail on BugGuide and they appear to match.  Because of your water rescue, we are tagging this posting with the Bug Humanitarian Award.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Scary looking tail end…
Location: Northern IL
July 25, 2015 3:42 pm
Dear Bugman,
I just finished reading your book and never would have imagined that I would enjoy a book about bugs so much! Then lo and behold, I have an opportunity to submit a bug question. We are in northern Illinois and this scary looking critter just appeared on our window screen. Can you please tell me what it is?
Signature: JP

Giant Ichneumon

Giant Ichneumon

Dear JP,
How nice to hear you enjoyed Daniel’s book.  This fascinating creature is a Giant Ichneumon, sometimes called a Stump Stabber, in the genus
Megarhyssa.  We believe your individual, because of both the patterns in the wings and the striped abdomen, is Megarhyssa macrurus, and you may compare to this image on BugGuide.  The Giant Ichneumons prey upon Horntails or Wood Wasps, including the Pigeon Horntail.  The long ovipositor of the Stump Stabber is required to correctly deposit eggs into branches infested with larval Wood Wasps.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Saving a Stranger
Location: Green Mountain Falls, Colorado
July 24, 2015 8:12 pm
So this bug we had saved from drowning in a lake/pond with a stick. He dried off and left after a while. Anyway once we got him on dry ground we were shocked by it. We never saw anything like it and really wanted to know what it is. If you could help us that would be amazing!!!
Signature: Lapen Family

Wood Wasp

Wood Wasp

Dear Lapen Family,
This is one of the Horntails or Wood Wasps in the genus
Urocerus, most probably Urocerus flavicornis, which is also pictured on BugGuide.  The larvae bore in the wood of coniferous trees.  Your rescue efforts are noteworthy and we are tagging this posting with the Bug Humanitarian Award.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Scary flying wasp ant??
Location: Arizona
July 23, 2015 10:51 pm
I woke up this morning and went downstairs to find this frightening critter crawling on the ceiling. My husband tried to kill it but lost it somewhere downstairs so we were forced to give up so we could go to work. Later that night it was captured and after much deliberation we decided to let it go outside. Did we make the right decision? What is this bug? Is it harmful or helpful?
Signature: Jenna

Black and Yellow Mud Dauber

Black and Yellow Mud Dauber

Dear Jenna,
When it comes to insects, “harmful or helpful” are kind of relative terms, but we would have to say that the Black and Yellow Mud Dauber in your image is helpful.  This solitary wasp is not aggressive, and the female constructs a nest of mud and provisions it with paralyzed spiders to feed her brood.  Fans of Spiders might not like wasps that feed on spiders, but the food chain with predators and prey is necessary for the web of life on our planet.  Because of your thoughtful actions, we are tagging this posting with the Bug Humanitarian Award.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Large wasp-like insect. Social.
Location: Cherokee County, Iowa
July 18, 2015 7:10 am
Hello. Last week on Thursday, I noticed a large, wasp-like insect flying around a storm drain at the place where I work. Normally, I wouldn’t pay much attention, but they were in an area of high traffic, and they seemed to “multiply” as the day went along. I first noticed just the one insect flying in and out of the drain Then there were two, and by the end of Thursday, there were four coming and going. Friday’s end brought with it six insects flying in and out.
Every time a truck would park near the storm drain, all of the insects would “swarm” the truck. No one was stung, however, the freight drivers did complain about the bugs. We were forced to eradicate the nest. Inside the drain was a softball-sized nest completely constructed of mud. I witnessed one of the wasps carrying a katydid, and a co-worker of mine noticed the same thing.
I live in northwest Iowa. I have included a picture of the wasp. I was unable to get a good picture of the nest as it was inside the storm drain. Thanks for your help
Signature: Sean

Great Black Wasp Carnage

Great Black Wasp Carnage

Dear Sean,
This is a Great Black Wasp,
Sphex pensylvanicus, and most of the information you have provided seems consistent with the recorded behavior of the species except the social behavior you stated.  Great Black Wasps are solitary wasps, not a social species, though we concede that if conditions for nesting are ideal, multiple females may nest in the same vicinity.  Great Black Wasps do prey upon Katydids to provide food for the brood.  In an effort to educate our readership, we are tagging this posting as Unnecessary Carnage.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination