Currently viewing the category: "Wasps and Hornets"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

tarantula hawk/wasp
No question — thanks to being directed by a friend to your site, I figured out what my bug was. However, I thought it may be worth using on your page because it’s a pretty good closeup of the tarantula hawk.
Thanks!
April
Tucson, AZ

Hi April,
Your photo is stunning. Thanks for sending it in.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Aphids
Bugman, I found quite a few of these guys hangin out on my roses here in Southern California this morning. I think they are Aphids and are about to move on to the next level of their spiritual journey as soon as I can find the rose spray. I know that you are not into carnage on global scale but…………… They are very interesting looking upclose and personal.
Rus

Hi Rus,
We have no problem killing Aphids, but we prefer to shoot them off the plants with a strong jet of water, or occasionally, spray them with soapy water. While your Aphid photo is wonderful, we are thrilled with the Aphid Wasp you have sent in. Aphid Wasps are in the family Aphidiidae. They are small parasitoid wasps that lay eggs in the abdomen of aphids. The larva then devours the Aphid’s internal organs, leaving a dry hollow shell known as an Aphid Mummy. Looks like nature is taking care of your Aphid problem.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Large Black and white wasp
Can you identify this wasp for me, and tell me a little about it. Wasps are a hobby of mine, but I have never seen this one in any book. They are very common at Brazos Bend State Park in Texas, where I am a volunteer, and are frequently seen going in and out of holes in wood, or walking on open soil or sand.
Thanks very much..
H. Glen Kilgore

Hi H. Glen,
Your photo is blurry, but it sure looks to us like a Mason Wasp, Monobia quadridens. According to BugGuide, the Mason Wasp: “Usually nests in wood borings, but sometimes burrows in dirt banks. Sometimes takes over abandoned nests of carpenter bees or ground bees, also Sceliphron (mud dauber) cells. Nest is provisioned with caterpillars, and cells of nest are separated by mud partitions.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Tarantula Wasp?
This bugger about 1 1/2 – 2 inches long red winged giant ant looking thing has been hanging out on the wall in front of my house for the last few hrs This thing is creepy but leave it up to me to get in something’s face that scares me :-p I live in Anthem, AZ (30 min from Phoenix). I looked through your site and I found an entry that looked like mine the Tarantula Wasp. It’s a bit odd I would think they were nocturnal maybe it’s sick/dieing?i took plenty of pictures feel free to post however many. Take care,
Sue

Hi Sue,
Your Tarantula Hawk photos are quite nice. They are diurnal and visit flowers, especially milkweed.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Fear of wasps, hornets, etc.
First of all, I loved your site! Lot’s of good information to be found here & I’m sure I’ll be back. Now, is there a name for the fear of wasps & other stinging insects? Fear of spiders is arachnophobia, so what is my phobia called? Yes, I am phobic of stinging insects! I’ve actually injured myself numerous times trying to flee when they got too close (20 ft. or so to me). I have read everything I can find trying to reassure myself that they aren’t going to harm me if I leave them alone, but I cannot seem to rid myself of this horrible fear. It s really starting to ruin my life. I was city girl all my life until 4 years ago when I married & moved to the country. Now, I have so many species of stinging insects that I’ve developed this phobia. I call it that because it truly is an irrational fear I have, but I cannot shake it. You see, we had an large invasion of Cicada Killers in our yard last year. They seem to want to fly very near people – almost to the point of landing on you. Also, we have an usually large number of carpenter bees on our property. Again, from what I’ve read, they aren’t known for their aggressiveness, but they are quite social which scares me and I just want them away from my property. Then, we have big, red wasps that fly up under the siding on our house at all 4 corners and under the siding above all the vents in the cement block foundation of the house. We live in a flood zone, so our house sits on a 5 ft. high cement block foundation, so when you are in the yard, they are flying in and out of the nest just below eye level. I am so afraid of all of these stinging pests that I am hyper-aware of them, I can spot them 50 ft away from me flying around. So far this year alone, I’ve went through 12 cans of wasp & hornet spray trying to kill them at the nests under the siding to no avail. Not only is this costly, but it’s making me crazy. Maybe I should try hypnosis or something to get over my fear, because it’s obvious that they aren’t going anywhere, so I either deal with it somehow or move out. The funny thing is that I was never fearful like this when I lived in town – possibly because I had never seen them in such high numbers like this. I’d also never had them fly around so close to me like they do out there. I’d never even heard of a Cicada Killer until last year – but now I dread the summer in fear of those large, scary things. Help me!!!!! Or, at least give me a name for my phobia?? Lisa Crow
Mount Vernon, Indiana

Hi Lisa,
Sometimes we love doing research. Your fear of wasps was located on an amazing site devoted to phobias and is called Spheksophobia. A related phobia would be Cnidophobia, the Fear of Stings

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Name of Wasp in photo
Can you please tell me the name of the wasp in the attached picture? I captured it in Central Florida. It has 4 yellow dots on its black back.
Nick Campbell

Because of the large size, we believe this is Campsomeris quadrimaculatus and not the much smaller similarly colored Scolia nobilitata, which only reaches slightly over a centimeter in length. These are Scolid Wasps that prey on the larvae of Scarab Beetles. The female locates the grubs by digging. She then stings and paralyzes it and creates a chamber around the now immobile grub and then lays an egg. Adults visit flowers for nectar and females can sting painfully if provoked.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination