Currently viewing the category: "Wasps and Hornets"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Velvet ant In Central Spain
Location: Ocaña, Toledo
July 10, 2014 3:15 am
Hi, I found a female velvet ant yesterday just south of Madrid. Later on I saw what looked like a winged male. I am unfamiliar with Mutillidae of Spain and have failed to find any information on the species these may be.
I have sent a photo of each, but the camera I used was somewhat poor. Another photo I found online, that seems to be of an identical animal is here: http://farm8.static.flickr.com/7049/6863722301_1a4c21453a.jpg
I appreciate that it is pretty much impossible to get a definitive species level ID without the actual animal, but any information would be greatly appreciated.
Thanks
Signature: Bec

Velvet Ant

Velvet Ant

Dear Bec,
Thanks for sending your Velvet Ant image.  We found a very similar looking Velvet Ant on FlickR that is identified as
Sigilla dorsata and then we found an image on Invertebrados Insectarium Virtual to support that identification.  Velvet Ants are flightless female wasps reported to have a very painful sting, and nonstinging male Velvet Ants have wings.  Your winged insect is in the order Hymenoptera, which included Ants, Bees and Wasps, but we cannot confirm that it is a male Velvet Ant.

Unknown Hymenopteran

Unknown Hymenopteran

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: UFB- unidentified flying bug
Location: South Salem, New York
July 8, 2014 6:23 am
Hi!
We found strange bugs digging gravelly holes in-between the stone tiles on our porch. We’ve looked it up several times, but we’ve found nothing useful. Does it sting? Can anybody confirm what type of insect this is?
Signature: The Greenbergs

Great Golden Digger Wasp

Great Golden Digger Wasp

Hi Greenbergs,
This is a Great Golden Digger Wasp, a docile, solitary wasp that spends its time visiting flowers for food and females hunt Katydids which they drag back to underground burrows to feed the young.  Only female wasps have stingers, and solitary wasps like the Great Golden Digger Wasp rarely sting humans, though a sting might result through careless handling.  Unlike social wasps like Hornets and Yellowjackets that will sting to protect the nest, the Great Golden Digger Wasp does not sting to protect the nest.  The sting is used to paralyze Katydids so the hatchling wasp larvae will have a source of fresh food.  We hope we have convinced you that the Great Golden Digger Wasps do not present a threat to you, your family or your pets, and that you will allow them to continue to nest on your porch.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Butterfly?
Location: Lynnwood, WA
July 7, 2014 6:24 pm
Hello,
this “caterpillar” was found outside of my work. I kept it in a jar with dirt and leaves and sticks, within days it made what looks like a cocoon. But it doesn’t look like any cocoon I’ve ever seen.
Signature: Clarissa Fitting

Elm Sawfly larva

Elm Sawfly larva

Dear Clarissa,
This is not a caterpillar.  We hope you are not disappointed to learn that this is an Elm Sawfly Larva and not a caterpillar, because it is an easy mistake to make.  We are very excited because though we have numerous images of both the larva and the adult Elm Sawfly, your documentation is the first image we have received of the cocoon and pupa of an Elm Sawfly.  The adult Elm Sawfly looks like a large bee, and Sawflies are classified along with Ants, Bees and Wasps in the order Hymenoptera, but unlike its relatives, the Elm Sawfly does not sting and is perfectly harmless.

Elm Sawfly Cocoon

Elm Sawfly Cocoon

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: No idea what this monster of a bug is, HELP!
Location: North Battleford, Saskatchewan. Canada.
July 5, 2014 3:19 pm
Hello. this was found in North Battleford, Saskatchewan today. I’ve never seen it before around here. It looks like the stuff of nightmares. Please let me know what this is I’m dealing with !
Signature: Amzin

Elm Sawfly

Elm Sawfly

Dear Amzin,
The harmless Elm Sawfly is somewhat frightening in appearance because of its large size and the resemblance to stinging bees and wasps which are also members of the same order Hymenoptera, but the Elm Sawfly is incapable of stinging.  The larvae of the Elm Sawfly are often confused for caterpillars.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is it
Location: Minnesota
July 4, 2014 11:50 am
We saw this bug on our dying oak tree. He and his friends remind me of a scorpion but we live in Minnesota.
Signature: P.Pratt

Stump Stabber

Stump Stabber

Dear P.Pratt,
This is a magnificent image of a female
Megarhyssa atrata, commonly called a Stump Stabber.  The female Stump Stabber uses her lengthy ovipositor to place her eggs deep beneath the surface of dead and dying trees that are infested with the larvae of Pigeon Horntails and other Wood Wasps.  The larvae of the Stump Stabbers hatch and feed upon the larvae of the Wood Wasps.  They are considered parasitoids that parasitize and eventually kill the host insect.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Huge Bug on Mirror
Location: Vancouver, BC.
July 1, 2014 5:06 pm
Hi Bugman,
I’m trying to figure out what this is- it was in my friend’s house today and its HUGE! It looks like its some sort of Mantis or something- Any ideas?
Signature: Jonathan

Ichneumon startles residents

Ichneumon startles residents

Hi Jonathan,
The look on your face is quite startled.  This is some species of Ichneumon, a family of Parasitoid Wasps that are not aggressive, though we have occasionally gotten reports from folks who have been stung.  Female Ichneumons lay eggs on or near specific insect or arthropod hosts and the larval Ichneumon feeds on the host insect, eventually killing it.  We are unable to determine the species of Ichneumon that entered your friend’s home.  According to BugGuide, the family Ichneumonidae:  “About 5,000 described species in North America, possibly 3,000 more undescribed; arguably, the largest animal family, with the estimated 60,000 species worldwide (up to 100,000, according to some estimates).”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination