Currently viewing the category: "Horntails, Wood Wasps and Sawflies"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: It’s like a wasp
Location: Southeast Missouri
October 2, 2013 2:25 pm
I wanna know what this thing is, it kinda looks like a big ass red wasp. My friend said it was a horse wasp but I don’t know
Signature: -Hunter Ham

Pigeon Horntail

Pigeon Horntail

Dear Hunter Ham,
This Wood Wasp is known as a Pigeon Horntail.  The larvae bore in the wood of dead and dying trees.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: orange caterpillar
Location: Seward, AK
September 8, 2013 11:01 pm
Hi! My son found this caterpillar crawling on the ground in front of our porch. We have looked a little bit online, and can’t seem to find what kind of caterpillar it is. Can you help?
Signature: Cdean

Elm Sawfly Larva

Elm Sawfly Larva

Hi Cdean,
This is the larva of an Elm Sawfly,
Cimbex americana, and they are frequently mistaken for caterpillars.  Sawflies are actually classified in the order Hymenoptera with bees and wasps, though they do not sting.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: How to get rid of dogwood sawfly larvae
Location: Georgian Bay, Lake Huron
August 30, 2013 12:13 pm
My dogwood bush/tree won’t last the night. Help! Thank you,
from Georgian Bay, Ontario Canada
photos copyright all rights reserved Karen Walsh
Signature: Desperate

Dogwood Sawfly Larvae

Dogwood Sawfly Larvae

Dear Desperate,
We don’t provide extermination advice.  You can try hand picking the Dogwood Sawfly Larvae,
Macremphytus tarsatus, but we don’t believe you need to worry about your dogwood surviving.  Loosing its leaves this season will not weaken your plant, however, you will be deprived of the lovely autumn display of the dogwood’s change to red this year.  Populations of plant feeding insects tend to come in cycles.  You might find some helpful information on the Penn State Woody Ornamental Integrated Pest Management sheet or the IPM of Midwest Landscapes sheet.

Dogwood Sawfly Larvae

Dogwood Sawfly Larvae

Thanks so much for replying. Very  helpful!

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What kind of wasp?
Location: Wauwatosa, WI
August 6, 2013 12:03 pm
This wasp landed on my friend today. Looks like some kind of mutated paper wasp with the elongated abdomen. There is also not much of a transition between abdomen and thorax and it’s usually very pronounced in wasps. Any idea what it is? Thank you!
Signature: Lucas B.

Pigeon Horntail

Pigeon Horntail

Hi Lucas,
This is a Wood Wasp known as a Pigeon Horntail.  The larvae bore in the wood of dead and dying trees.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Huge wasp or hornet
Location: Update New York
August 17, 2013 1:53 pm
What on earth is this massive bug, and is the stinger really half the length of its body??
Signature: Almost stung

Pigeon Horntail Carnage

Pigeon Horntail Carnage

Dear Almost stung [not even],
This is a Pigeon Horntail, a type of Wood Wasp.  What you have mistaken for a stinger is the ovipositor of the female Pigeon Horntail which she drives into the wood of dead or dying trees to lay eggs.  The larvae are wood boring insects.  We are guessing by the grotesque and unnatural position of this dead Pigeon Horntail that it is a victim of Unnecessary Carnage.  In defense of your having mistaken the ovipositor for a stinger, the stingers of bees and wasps are actually modified ovipositors.  In some insects like solitary wasps, the stinger/ovipositor is multipurpose, but in social insects like Honey Bees, the sterile female workers can only sting since they are incapable of laying eggs.  We believe the chances of being stung by this Pigeon Horntail are next to nil, however, if the ovipositor can drive through wood, it might surely be capable of piercing the far softer human skin, but unlike sterile workers in social insect colonies which sting to protect the hive, Pigeon Horntails would have no instincts to protect their young, hence they are not aggressive.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: what is it?
Location: Northampton, England
July 13, 2013 4:39 pm
can you identify this bug please
Signature: Donna

Wood Wasp

Great Wood Wasp

Dear Donna,
This is a harmless Great Wood Wasp,
Urocerus gigas, a species whose larvae bore in dead, generally coniferous wood.  See UK Safari for more information.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination