Currently viewing the category: "Horntails, Wood Wasps and Sawflies"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: No idea what this monster of a bug is, HELP!
Location: North Battleford, Saskatchewan. Canada.
July 5, 2014 3:19 pm
Hello. this was found in North Battleford, Saskatchewan today. I’ve never seen it before around here. It looks like the stuff of nightmares. Please let me know what this is I’m dealing with !
Signature: Amzin

Elm Sawfly

Elm Sawfly

Dear Amzin,
The harmless Elm Sawfly is somewhat frightening in appearance because of its large size and the resemblance to stinging bees and wasps which are also members of the same order Hymenoptera, but the Elm Sawfly is incapable of stinging.  The larvae of the Elm Sawfly are often confused for caterpillars.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Strange Black Bug In My Backyard
Location: South-Central Ontario, Canada
June 6, 2014 6:41 pm
Hi Bugman,
I saw this bug in my backyard just before dark on June 6th. Never seen one like it before. It’s about 2 inches long, winged, black, with three distinct white spots on it’s side and yellowish legs and antennae.
Unfortunately due to the lack of light I was unable to get a really clear picture of it. Any help in identifying it, or at least narrowing down the possibilities, would be appreciated.
Thank You.
Signature: Laura Jean

Elm Sawfly, we believe

Elm Sawfly, we believe

Hi Laura Jean,
the image is quite blurry.  it might be an elm sawlfy
http://www.whatsthatbug.com/2013/07/01/elm-sawfly-13/

Thanks Daniel :)
Wow, you’re good. Looking at the other images, it definitely is an elm sawfly. I really didn’t think you’d be able to identify it so quickly and accurately with such a poor photo. It was the best I could do bending over a drain spout with a flashlight in one hand and my iPad in the other, trying not to get too close since it did kind of look like a wasp, while at the same time trying to watch for skunks. I wanted to get at least one shot before it was gone and I didn’t have anything handy that I could catch it with. (I don’t touch bugs with bare hands.)
I just wanted to be sure it wasn’t some kind of foreign invader that would be cause for concern, since I’ve never seen one before.  Good to know there is nothing to worry about.
Thank you,
Laura

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this?
Location: NE Ohio Ashtabula county
May 30, 2014 4:06 am
Bugman,
We saw this May 29, 2014 in our back field. It was about 2 inches long, large black wings, one big yellow spot on back. The last segment of each leg was yellow and the antenna were yellow as well. It looks very similar to the digger wasp scolia dubia but it was larger and only one spot on its back. It flew very slowly landed on a leaf and wrapped the two mid legs around the leaf.
Thanks for any help
Signature: Judy

Elm Sawfly

Elm Sawfly

Dear Judy,
Mistaking this Elm Sawfly for a wasp is understandable, since wasps and Sawflies are in the same insect order, but unlike wasps, Sawflies do not sting.  The abdominal markings can vary, but your individual looks very close to this image on BugGuide.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Fairy Disguised As Bug?
Location: Massachusetts
May 20, 2014 9:25 am
Though I am a thirty one year old adult I often try to keep the “fantastic” alive in my imagination. As I was contemplating the *finally* nice weather in Massachusetts, (it is nearing the end of May) I began to daydream falling leaves and flying dandelion seeds as fairies in disguise. When I was interrupted by technology, (iPhone alert) I looked down and this little guy was chilling out on my phone. His wings were delicate and lacey, like a cicada’s, and his face was that of an ant’s, pinchers and all. His head turned like a praying mantis, and as I was taking a picture, it tilted it’s head up and looked right at me! It was this, sort of intelligent maneuver, that made me giggle at the idea – hey, perhaps this is a fairy in disguise! I have looked for two hours on the Internet to try and identify my ephemeral friend, to no avail. Please help! I’d really like to know what kind of big this is!
Signature: Liz

Sawfly

Sawfly

Hi Liz,
We hate to dissipate the illusion that the spring day helped to create regarding your interaction with this insect, but we believe, despite the blurriness of the image, that we have properly identified it as a Sawfly.  It resembles this Conifer Sawfly in the genus
Neodiprion that is posted to bugGuide.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Unusual Metallic Wasp?
Location: San Juan Islands, WA USA
April 26, 2014 9:49 am
This guy was hanging out on my front steps in March. I’ve never seen anything quite like it. The wings were silver, metallic, and shiny, the head was yellow and feathery or dusty looking. It looked wasp-like. It seemed unresponsive, might have been dead. It was about 1-2 inches long.
Signature: Scarlett

Hymenopteran

Hymenopteran

Hi Scarlett,
We are posting your image and letter while we continue to researching the identity of this Hymenopteran, a member of the order that includes wasps, bees and sawflies.

Request to Eric Eaton
Hi Eric,
This looks like a Sawfly to me, but I cannot find its identity.  Any
thoughts?
Thanks
Daniel

Eric Eaton Responds
Daniel:
Good call.  It is indeed a sawfly, likely a species of Dolerus, almost completely covered in flower pollen.
Eric

Ed. Note:  See BugGuide for information on Dolerus Sawflies.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: caterpillars taking over vine
Location: Louisiana
April 27, 2014 7:27 pm
I have recently begun renovation on an old industrial lot and have been trying to identify many of the plant species that have taken over. I am a novice, so I’m not even sure what the vine is, my guess is morning glory. upon my visit to the lot today I have observed an abundance of an orange headed caterpillar eating away at it. There are very many of these, but they are isolated to one vine. I would greatly appreciate assistance in identifying them as I have great curiosity about the ecosystem in new Orleans, Louisiana. I have taken this photo today, April 27.
Signature: the curious prancing unicorn

Sawfly Larvae

Sawfly Larvae3

Hi curious prancing unicorn,
These are not caterpillars.  They are the larvae of Sawflies, and your mistake is a common error.  Without knowing the species of plant they were feeding upon, it might be difficult to correctly identify these Sawfly Larvae to the species level, but they do resemble this image of Birch Sawflies from BugGuide, so we believe they are in the family Argidae.  You can browse through the images on BugGuide to see if you can find a good match.

Sawfly Larvae

Sawfly Larvae

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination