Currently viewing the category: "Horntails, Wood Wasps and Sawflies"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Never seen this bug before
Location: Limpopo, hoedspruit (lowveld)
January 31, 2014 9:13 am
Hi, I saw this caterpillar in our garden and wonder if you could help to ID it.
Area: South Africa, Lowveld
near Hoedspruit, Limpopo
Season: summer 31 January 2014
Size: about 1.5 cm in length and 1 cm wide
I live in the Balule nature reserve thus it’s a wilderness area
Thank you
Signature: Laetitia

What's That Grub?

What’s That Grub?

Hi Laetitia,
This is not a Caterpillar, but we do believe it is a larval insect.  In our opinion, this is most likely a Beetle Grub, though we would not rule out that it might be a Sawfly Larva.  While your individual looks very different from the larvae in the links we provided, we wanted to show you some examples of possibly classifications.  Knowing the plant this larva was feeding upon might help with the identification.

What's That Grub???

What’s That Grub???

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Caterpillar ID
Location: York Region Forest, Newmarket, Ontario, Canada
November 6, 2013 10:36 pm
Hello Bugman,
I would like to get some info on this caterpillar.
It was found in York Region forest, just half hours drive of Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
It was searching on old decaying tree trunks in the parking lot when I first spied it, during the middle of October 2013. A few days later, I found a second one (may be same one) in the same location.
I took both photos, of which you may use for display purposes.
I have been searching many butterfly and moth categories, without any luck in naming it. Maybe (I’m thinking) its a sawfly? Its about 1 1/2 to 2 inches in length.
I have just started a website and trying to name the species that I have included on it.
Thanks for any info…
Brian

Pine Sawfly Larva

Pine Sawfly Larva

Dear Brian,
Just because it looks like a caterpillar and acts like a caterpillar, does not necessarily mean it is a caterpillar.  You are correct that this is a Sawfly Larva.  It is an Introduced Pine Sawfly Larva,
Diprion similis, and according to BugGuide, it is an adventive species introduced from Europe.  BugGuide also notes:  “Although a serious pest at times, it normally stunts rather than kills its hosts. It can be a more serious problem with young trees and in cases such as Christmas trees where appearance is important. It has natural enemies and diseases, so large outbreaks are only intermittently seen.”

Introduced Pine Sawfly Larva

Introduced Pine Sawfly Larva

Dear Daniel,
Many thanks for your reply -to my request asking for identification,
regarding the bug that I had found – most informative. No wonder many of
the conifer trees in that area that it was found in, had issues with their
foliage etc.
Brian

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Weird looking wasp!
Location: California/north american midwest
October 10, 2013 1:49 pm
I have no idea what this weird looking wasp type bug is hope you could help.
Signature: byron

Pigeon Horntail

Pigeon Horntail

Hi Byron,
Please clarify if this photo was taken in California or the North American Midwest.
  This appears to be a Pigeon Horntail, a species of Wood Wasp, but BugGuide’s data does not have any reports from California, however BugGuide states it is probably adventive in California.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: It’s like a wasp
Location: Southeast Missouri
October 2, 2013 2:25 pm
I wanna know what this thing is, it kinda looks like a big ass red wasp. My friend said it was a horse wasp but I don’t know
Signature: -Hunter Ham

Pigeon Horntail

Pigeon Horntail

Dear Hunter Ham,
This Wood Wasp is known as a Pigeon Horntail.  The larvae bore in the wood of dead and dying trees.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: orange caterpillar
Location: Seward, AK
September 8, 2013 11:01 pm
Hi! My son found this caterpillar crawling on the ground in front of our porch. We have looked a little bit online, and can’t seem to find what kind of caterpillar it is. Can you help?
Signature: Cdean

Elm Sawfly Larva

Elm Sawfly Larva

Hi Cdean,
This is the larva of an Elm Sawfly,
Cimbex americana, and they are frequently mistaken for caterpillars.  Sawflies are actually classified in the order Hymenoptera with bees and wasps, though they do not sting.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: How to get rid of dogwood sawfly larvae
Location: Georgian Bay, Lake Huron
August 30, 2013 12:13 pm
My dogwood bush/tree won’t last the night. Help! Thank you,
from Georgian Bay, Ontario Canada
photos copyright all rights reserved Karen Walsh
Signature: Desperate

Dogwood Sawfly Larvae

Dogwood Sawfly Larvae

Dear Desperate,
We don’t provide extermination advice.  You can try hand picking the Dogwood Sawfly Larvae,
Macremphytus tarsatus, but we don’t believe you need to worry about your dogwood surviving.  Loosing its leaves this season will not weaken your plant, however, you will be deprived of the lovely autumn display of the dogwood’s change to red this year.  Populations of plant feeding insects tend to come in cycles.  You might find some helpful information on the Penn State Woody Ornamental Integrated Pest Management sheet or the IPM of Midwest Landscapes sheet.

Dogwood Sawfly Larvae

Dogwood Sawfly Larvae

Thanks so much for replying. Very  helpful!

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination