Currently viewing the category: "Horntails, Wood Wasps and Sawflies"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Large wood boring bug with oviduct
Location: Syracuse in
September 1, 2014 12:19 pm
We found this large black an yellow striped winged bug with oviduct …any thoughts
Signature: Mary b

Pigeon Horntail

Pigeon Horntail

Hi Mary,
This is a Pigeon Horntail, a species of Wood Wasp.  The egg laying organ is an ovipositor.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Any ideas what this is?
Location: Buffalo, NY
August 17, 2014 9:10 pm
Does anyone have a clue what this flying bug is? Not sure if it came from the pine logs I was cutting but it also appears to have a stinger
Signature: Nick

Black and Red Horntail

Black and Red Horntail

Dear Nick,
Though we have no shortage of other Horntails on our site, including the Pigeon Horntail, this is the first example we are posting of a Black and Red Horntail,
Urocerus cressoni.  Horntails are Wood Wasps and the larvae bore in wood of dead and dying trees.  According to BugGuide:  “hosts include Fir, Spruce, and Pine (Abies, Picea, Pinus).”  

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Curious Large
Location: Hastings, MI
August 17, 2014 9:51 am
Hi,
My mom and I found this bug on a dead tree stump where there are a ton of Stump Stabbers around. The next day I found it dead on another area of the stump. I didn’t think it was a wasp since it does not have the separated thorax. It is a bit scary since it was so big, but I’m just wondering what it is since my 13 year old daughter has more curiosity than what is good for her.
Signature: Nervous Mom

PIgeon Horntail

PIgeon Horntail

Hi Nervous Mom,
You have no need to fear this Pigeon Horntail, because even though it is a Wood Wasp, they do not sting.  The female uses her ovipositor to deposit eggs beneath the surface of dead and dying trees and the larvae are wood borers.  Interestingly, the presence of Stump Stabbers makes perfect sense as the larvae of Stump Stabbers parasitize the larvae of Pigeon Horntails.  This particular female did not mature properly as her wings appear to have atrophied.

Thanks Daniel,
That is so incredibly interesting.  We see the Stump Stabber’s all the time but have never seen the Pigeon Horntail there.  We are around this stump all the time (it is huge) since my herb garden surrounds a small portion of it.  Now we don’t have to be afraid.
Thanks again,
Jenn

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Caterpillars on a red-twig dogwood
Location: Chester County, PA
August 12, 2014 10:17 am
While working with a client in their garden yesterday, I noted these caterpillars on a Cornus sericea (red twig dogwood) shrub. I have not seen these before, and would like to know what they are. Fortunately, the clients were just as curious, and willing to “live and let live”, especially as there was very little foliage damage. This is in southeastern Pennsylvania, photo taken August 11, 2014.
Thank you!
Signature: The Gardening Coach

Dogwood Sawflies

Dogwood Sawflies

Dear Gardening Coach,
Though they are easily mistaken for caterpillars, these are actually the larvae of Dogwood Sawflies,
Macremphytus tarsatus, and they are members of the order Hymenoptera that includes wasps, bees and ants.  According to BugGuide:  ” Young larvae are covered with a powdery white waxy coating. Mature larvae are yellow beneath with black spots or cross-stripes above.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Wasp or locust
Location: Southern Ontario Canada
August 12, 2014 4:21 am
Intendant at my golf course captured in these two very dangerous looking bugs what are they
Signature: Curious golfer

Pigeon Horntails

Pigeon Horntails

Dear Curious Golfer,
These are Pigeon Horntails, a species of Wood Wasp.  The female Pigeon Horntail lays eggs in dead or dying deciduous trees, and the larvae bore in the wood, feeding as they bore.  According to BugGuide:  “hosts include beech, elm, hickory, maple, oak, poplar, apple, pear, sycamore, and hackberry.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Big wasp like bug visits picnic
Location: Powell river, bc
August 8, 2014 5:21 pm
We were having a picnic at the Saltery Bay picnic/beach and this rather large bug decided to join us
August 6, around 5:30 pm
Powell river regional district, bc not far from the Saltery bay ferry terminal
Signature: Noni

Wood Wasp:  Urocerus albicornis

Wood Wasp: Urocerus albicornis

Hi Noni,
This is
Urocerus albicornis, a species of Horntail or Wood Wasp without a common name.  According to BugGuide, it is found in  “forested regions from southern boreal Canada south to NC-MP-NM-CA” and “hosts include fir, larch, spruce, pine, Douglas-fir, hemlock, and western red cedar.”  According to all the information we have read, they are harmless and do not sting humans, including this family information on BugGuide:  “Horntails do not sting: what looks like a sting is the ovipositor the female uses to lay eggs in wood.”  With that stated, we need to divulge that we just posted this very credible report that a man in England was “stung” by a European relative of your Wood Wasp.  That unverified report seems to be an anomaly.

Thank you for your reply.. She visited a bit and then with gentle nudge flew off on her way, much to the happiness of the other occupant of the picnic blanket.. Such a beautiful big bug!!!
;) noni StReMmInG

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination