Currently viewing the category: "Horntails, Wood Wasps and Sawflies"
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Subject: Giant wasp
Location: Middle of, Ontario canada
August 24, 2015 10:16 am
Can you identify this bug?
Signature: I dont know what this means

Pigeon Horntail

Pigeon Horntail

This is a Pigeon Horntail, a species of Wood Wasp.  The female uses her ovipositor to lay eggs beneath the bark of unhealthy trees.  Pigeon Horntails do not sting.

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Subject: Possible stink bug eating red caterpillar
Location: Livingston County, MI
August 22, 2015 8:26 pm
Found this hanging off a leaf in a meadow behind my house. I think the bug is some sort of stinkbug but I have not been able to find a match online. No idea on the caterpillar type.
Signature: Cheryl E.

Predatory Stink Bug Nymph eats Sawfly Larva

Predatory Stink Bug Nymph eats Sawfly Larva

Dear Cheryl,
This is a Predatory Stink Bug nymph, possibly in the genus
Apoecilus based on this BugGuide image, but it is not feeding on a caterpillar.  The prey is a Sawfly larva in the family Argidae, and we have a visual match to Arge coccinea thanks to this BugGuide image.

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Subject: What is this????
Location: Newfoundland, Canada
August 17, 2015 10:37 am
hi there, just saw this and was wondering what it is?? it has me freaked out!!!!
Signature: Denise

Horntail

Horntail

Dear Denise,
This is a Horntail or Wood Wasp in the genus
Urocerus, most likely Urocerus albicornis.  They do not sting.  The female uses her ovipositor to lay her eggs beneath the bark of conifers.  According to BugGuide:  “hosts include fir, larch, spruce, pine, Douglas-fir, hemlock, and western red cedar.”

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Subject: Caterpillar
Location: Minnesota
August 12, 2015 1:34 pm
Dear bugman,
I found a caterpillar at my lake cabin in Minnesota. I would like to know what kind it is, will it turn in a moth, etc.
Signature: from cassie

Sawfly Larva

Sawfly Larva

Dear Cassie,
We lightened up your lateral view and we conclude this is not a Caterpillar.  There are ten legs visible, three true legs and seven prolegs, and because insects have bilateral symmetry, we can deduce that there are seven pairs of prolegs.  Most caterpillars have five pairs of prolegs, though caterpillars from the Inchworm family Geometridae have but two pairs of prolegs.  This is the larva of a Sawfly, and though it really resembles members of the genus Cimbex, including the Elm Sawfly, we have never seen such coloration that we can recall.  Perhaps one of our readers will recognize this Sawfly.

Unknown Sawfly Larva

Unknown Sawfly Larva

Ed. Note:  August 15, 2015
We finally located an image of an Elm Sawfly Larva on BugGuide with similar coloration, and it is also from Minnesota.

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Subject: What is this creepy guy?
Location: Sundre, Alberta
August 11, 2015 9:24 pm
Just wondering what this guy is and if it’s harmful. We’ve had a few around this year, and this one was quite upset when I moved it from it’s location and flew right at me afterwards.
It was in the shadow of my ATV seat where I was going to sit.
Signature: Sondzi

Giant Wood Wasp

Giant Wood Wasp

Dear Sondzi,
This Horntail or Wood Wasp,
Urocerus flavicornis, is not considered dangerous to humans as they do not sting.  The larvae feed on the wood of coniferous trees.

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Subject: what is this big insect?
Location: Comox VAlley, Vancouver Island
July 29, 2015 11:31 pm
Dear bugman, this insect came buzzed by us this evening, July 29, 2015. It is the biggest I have seen yet in Southern Coastal BC. We live on the East Coast of Vancouver Island, in the Comox Valley. Our house is by a creek in a semi-forested, green belt area which gives us great opportunity for observation of our flora and fauna. This insect flew by slowly, at first I thought it was a juvenile hummingbird or huge moth. It made no sound other than with its wings when it was flying and did not move very fast. In fact it was still most of the time. I took many pictures, most of them not very sharp. I picked the best ones and hope you can help me figure out what it is that was visiting us. Is it a cicada? a cicada eater? It has stripes on its abdomen, like a wasp. It has those short club-like antennae that remind me of a fly. It has a very small head relative to its body, and is antennae and the outer portions of its legs are yellow.
Signature: Monika on Morrison Creek

Elm Sawfly

Elm Sawfly

Dear Monika,
This Elm Sawfly is a non-stinging member of the insect order that includes Wasps and Bees.  The larvae of the Elm Sawfly are frequently confused for caterpillars.

Elm Sawfly

Elm Sawfly

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination