Currently viewing the category: "Horntails, Wood Wasps and Sawflies"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Larva ID
Location: Chimney Tops Capstone
October 13, 2016 1:35 pm
Hello there! Today I was wondering if I could have and ID conformation given to a larva. This larva has been posted to BugGuide (it is my image) and we are currently undecided on an ID. At first I thought it could be a caterpillar, but I am more convinced that it is Gilpinia hercyniae. The thing is, we are not sure about the range of this sawfly larva. It seems to be that G. hercyniae is an uncommon insect, and i have yet to find records of it in TN. Just wanted to see what you guys thought about it. Thanks for your time! Link to the BG page http://bugguide.net/node/view/1297521
It was found on 8/24/16 in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park at the Chimney Tops Capstone , in Sevier County, Tennessee.
~35° 37.725’N 83° 28.682’W
~4,700 feet above sea level
Signature: Cicada Lover

Possibly European Spruce Sawfly

Possibly European Spruce Sawfly

Dear Cicada Lover,
We agree with you that this appears like it might be a European Spruce Sawfly larva as pictured on BugGuide.  Have you any other images?  It would be great if you had an image where we are able to count the prolegs.  According to Natural Resources Canada:  “Native to Europe, the European spruce sawfly was first reported in Canada in 1922 and in the United States in 1929, but did not really attract the attention of foresters until 1930, when it caused severe damage to spruce stands in Quebec’s Gaspé peninsula. The infestation spread rapidly throughout northeastern North America. The discovery of this infestation led to the development of a national forest insect inventory network consisting of the states in the northeastern U.S.   Sawfly populations began to decline in 1938 with the emergence of a viral disease that affects the larvae, returning to endemic levels in 1945, where it has since remained throughout Canada. Its current Canadian range extends from the Atlantic provinces to Manitoba.”  Tennessee is further south than any reported BugGuide sightings.  Please let us know if you learn anything new from the BugGuide posting.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Insect all over Cedar trees
Location: Castleford, Idaho
October 10, 2016 4:45 pm
It appears to be boring into the trees and causing damage
Signature: ??

Horntail

Horntail

This is a Horntail in the family Siricidae, and probably in the subfamily Siricinae, the subfamily that feeds on conifers.  Horntails are non-stinging relatives of Wasps, and they have larvae that bore in wood.  This female is likely in the process of laying eggs.  She looks like she might be Sirex nigricornis, a species pictured on BugGuide.  Though there are only a few images posted to BugGuide and they are from Pennsylvania and New York, the range, according to BugGuide, is “across Canada (QC-AB-?BC) and the US south to FL-TX” and “wide host range, mostly on various pines.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Grasshopper/bee hybrid?
Location: Bozeman, MT
September 30, 2016 3:17 pm
This was a very loud bug about 2.5 inches long in overall length. Looks like it had a stinger about 3/8 inches long.
Signature: Curious

Pigeon Horntail

Pigeon Horntail

Dear Curious,
This is a Pigeon Horntail, a non-stinging relative of wasps and bees.   See this BugGuide image for comparison.   Pigeon Horntails lay eggs beneath the bark on deciduous trees and the larvae are wood borers.  According to BugGuide:  “hosts include beech, elm, hickory, maple, oak, poplar, apple, pear, sycamore, and hackberry.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Big winged black bug with long tail?
Location: Alfalfa, Oregon
September 26, 2016 8:51 am
Location: central Oregon
Seen: September 25, 2016
Signature: Sandy

Black Horntail

Black Horntail

Dear Sandy,
This is a female Horntail, a non-stinging relative of wasps that uses her long ovipositor to lay eggs beneath the bark of trees.  We believe your black Horntail is in the genus Sirex based on BugGuide images.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Disgusting looking critters…please help identify
Location: Melbourne, Laverton VIC footpath into Laverton P12 College
September 2, 2016 3:06 am
Was walking along Bladin Rd Melbourne VIC and saw this ‘clump’ just on footpath leading into Laverton College. A staff who has been there for last 27years said they are caterpillars but i am still curious if they really are caterpollars. Apparently they seemed to have come from the eucalypt tree near footpath.
Signature: Curious

Spitfires

Spitfires

Dear Curious,
These are Spitfires, a name used in Australia for the larvae of Sawflies, non-stinging relatives of bees and wasps whose larvae are often confused with caterpillars.  Based on the image used on the Australian Museum site, they may be Steel Blue Sawflies in the genus
Perga, and the site states:  “Steel-blue Sawfly larvae in the Sydney area feed on eucalypts.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Unknown bug
Location: Huntsville, Ontario.
August 8, 2016 7:08 pm
Could not identify this one. Wasp?
Thanks for any help you can offer.
No hurry.
Signature: Barry

Sawfly Sculpture

Sawfly Sculpture

Dear Barry,
When we opened the first of your images, we were so disoriented, we thought we were looking at an insect inspired sculpture, and not a real insect.  It wasn’t until we opened a second attached image that we realized we were looking at a dead Sawfly that had been posed, upended, with its legs functioning as the foundation of the “sculpture” and our orientation returned.  Your insect is an Elm Sawfly,
Cimbex americana, and you can compare your dead individual to this image of a living specimen on BugGuide.  Sawflies are non-stinging relatives of wasps and bees, and Sawfly larvae are frequently confused for caterpillars.

Elm Sawfly

Elm Sawfly

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination