Currently viewing the category: "Horntails, Wood Wasps and Sawflies"
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Subject: Wasp type
Location: Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
January 29, 2016 8:40 pm
Hi. Found a new wasp sp. in my backyard. Looks somewhat like a Popper Wasp, back lacks yellow legs etc. Any thoughts?
Signature: Tim D

Bottlebrush Sawfly

Bottlebrush Sawfly

Dear Tim,
This is a Bottlebrush Sawfly,
Pterygophorus cinctus, and we previously misidentified as possibly a Potter Wasp ourselves once.  Your image is quite beautiful.

Thanks Daniel!
I’ve been having a bit of a influx of fly/wasp type sp. into my inner suburban Melbourne (Aust) backyard this summer, including Banded Beefly, Wasp-mimic Hoverfly, as well as other more common hoverfly and butterflies such as Common Darts. Very unusual but very fascinating!
Cheers,
Tim

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Subject: Bug identity
Location: Nova Scotia Canada
January 27, 2016 9:12 am
We have found 5 of these in our house …Please help us identify what it is …Thank you
Signature: Paula Hurley

Wood Wasp

Wood Wasp

Dear Paula,
Do you have firewood in the house?  We believe this Wood Wasp and its coevals emerged from firewood because their normal development was accelerated due to the heat indoors.  Your individual is most likely in the genus
Xiphydria, and because of its dark antennae, it most closely resembles the images of Xiphydria tibialis posted to BugGuide.

Yes we do…Thank you very much my husband thought it looked like a form of a wasp..hope they don’t sting …thank you so much for the quick response :)

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: RE:
Location: Hernando County, FL
January 5, 2016 8:16 pm
Hi there,
This is just a reiteration of an earlier question you got that I also saw. I live about an hour north of Tampa, FL, and saw the same larvae as the one in this photo:
http://www.whatsthatbug.com/2014/02/11/orange-larvae-caterpillarf-sawflies/
I thought my photos would be a good complement to the others already provided and may help someone else seeking the ID of this bug. The larva moved quickly, but I did not find what they were feeding on. I found them in the vicinity of our cactus garden, but I found they were more on a piece of driftwood than any of the cacti. I only saw them crawling around at that one specific time and don’t believe I caught sight of any others in our garden after that encounter (but there were plenty during that encounter, crawling around quickly but aimlessly). Unfortunately, I did not get a photo of their prolegs that I can find.
This was in late January of last year (so approximately 1 year ago). I haven’t seen anything this year so far, though!
Thanks, and good luck fighting the good fight!
Signature: Fellow Buglover

Sawfly Larva

Sawfly Larva

Dear Fellow Buglover,
Thanks for providing additional images similar to those from a previous posting.  We believe both examples are Sawfly Larvae, and both look very similar to this BugGuide image identified as being in the genus
Arge.  Can you provide any information on the size of the individual?

Sawfly Larva

Sawfly Larva

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Interesting insect
Location: Nebraska
December 5, 2015 9:40 pm
Found this verys curiuse creature deceased and attached to the tree curiouse as to what it is
Signature: Jerry

PIgeon Horntail

Pigeon Horntail

Dear Jerry,
This female Pigeon Horntail died while laying eggs.  She probably could not extract her ovipositor from the tree trunk.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bee, wasp, or other
Location: Virginia
November 14, 2015 6:41 pm
Dear bug man,
A friend found this bug and I’m having a hard time finding what it is with the help of Google (haha) hoping you might be able to shed some light on us. Thank you so much for your time. :)
Fellow bug lover,
Signature: Lena

Asian Horntail

Asian Horntail

Hi Lena,
We are going to have to go with “other” on this identification.  This is an Asian Horntail,
Eriotremex formosanus, which we identified thanks to this image posted to BugGuide.  According to BugGuide:  “introduced accidentally with wood (crates, etc.); first reported in 1975” and the larvae feed on “hardwoods (oak, hickory, sweetgum, probably others); attacks mostly dead/dying wood, so not a serious pest.”  Additional information can be found on Featured Creatures.

Asian Horntail

Asian Horntail

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Mystery bug?
Location: Rhode Island
October 14, 2015 5:15 pm
hi, this bug was found outside a few weeks ago this fall in Rhode Island. I was just wondering if you might be able to indentify it for me ? thank you 😀
Signature: -Zarah J

Pigeon Horntail

Pigeon Horntail

Dear Zarah,
This sure looks like a female Pigeon Horntail, a species with larvae that bore in the wood of diseased and compromised deciduous hardwood trees, which is why seeing it on a bed of pine needles is a bit odd.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination