Currently viewing the category: "Horntails, Wood Wasps and Sawflies"
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Subject: what is this big insect?
Location: Comox VAlley, Vancouver Island
July 29, 2015 11:31 pm
Dear bugman, this insect came buzzed by us this evening, July 29, 2015. It is the biggest I have seen yet in Southern Coastal BC. We live on the East Coast of Vancouver Island, in the Comox Valley. Our house is by a creek in a semi-forested, green belt area which gives us great opportunity for observation of our flora and fauna. This insect flew by slowly, at first I thought it was a juvenile hummingbird or huge moth. It made no sound other than with its wings when it was flying and did not move very fast. In fact it was still most of the time. I took many pictures, most of them not very sharp. I picked the best ones and hope you can help me figure out what it is that was visiting us. Is it a cicada? a cicada eater? It has stripes on its abdomen, like a wasp. It has those short club-like antennae that remind me of a fly. It has a very small head relative to its body, and is antennae and the outer portions of its legs are yellow.
Signature: Monika on Morrison Creek

Elm Sawfly

Elm Sawfly

Dear Monika,
This Elm Sawfly is a non-stinging member of the insect order that includes Wasps and Bees.  The larvae of the Elm Sawfly are frequently confused for caterpillars.

Elm Sawfly

Elm Sawfly

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: can you identify this insect?
Location: Oakville, Ontario, Canada.
July 26, 2015 5:35 pm
Rescued this insect from my pool. Never seen one like it. First thought is it may be some type of hornet/wasp. It is around 1″ long.
Signature: Danno Cracker

Male Pigeon Horntail

Male Pigeon Horntail

Dear Danno,
We are very excited to post your image of a male Pigeon Horntail, because though we have numerous images of female Pigeon Horntails on our site, there is a noticeable dearth of images of male individuals.  Female Pigeon Horntails have a long stingerlike ovipositor that is used to lay eggs in the wood of dead and dying trees, and males lack the ovipositor.  We compared your image to that of a male Pigeon Horntail on BugGuide and they appear to match.  Because of your water rescue, we are tagging this posting with the Bug Humanitarian Award.

Kristine Lachapelle, Sue Dougherty, Andrea Leonard Drummond, Heather Duggan-Christensen liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Saving a Stranger
Location: Green Mountain Falls, Colorado
July 24, 2015 8:12 pm
So this bug we had saved from drowning in a lake/pond with a stick. He dried off and left after a while. Anyway once we got him on dry ground we were shocked by it. We never saw anything like it and really wanted to know what it is. If you could help us that would be amazing!!!
Signature: Lapen Family

Wood Wasp

Wood Wasp

Dear Lapen Family,
This is one of the Horntails or Wood Wasps in the genus
Urocerus, most probably Urocerus flavicornis, which is also pictured on BugGuide.  The larvae bore in the wood of coniferous trees.  Your rescue efforts are noteworthy and we are tagging this posting with the Bug Humanitarian Award.

Alisha Bragg, Angie Norman, Ann Levitsky, Kristina Larson, Leigh Rollins, Dean McDonald, Heather Duggan-Christensen, Sue Dougherty, Piroska Farkas liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: what is this
Location: spanaway Washington
June 28, 2015 11:57 am
Its about 1,5 to 2 inches long
Signature: lamont

Horntail

Horntail

Dear Lamont,
This is a Giant Wood Wasp or Horntail in the genus
Urocerus, and based on images and sighting information on BugGuide, we believe it is Urocerus flavicornisThe ovipositor at the end of the abdomen indicates that this is a female.  The female uses her ovipositor to deposit her eggs beneath the bark of trees and the larvae that hatch bore in the wood.

Tyler Beechroot, Sue Dougherty liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Large winged insect.
Location: UK. North west England. PR5 0JY.
July 3, 2015 5:12 am
Hello.
Could you please identify the insect from my garden? It’s wing span was approx.. 50 mm. and it’s body length approx… 40 mm. As can be seen on the photos, it had a single ovoid cream coloured mark on it’s back. It appeared to be in distress. Many thanks. Barry Lewis.
it’s wing
Signature: Barry Lewis

Birch Sawfly

Birch Sawfly

Dear Barry,
Because of it resemblance to North American species, we quickly recognized your insect as a Sawfly in the family Cimbicidae, a non-stinging relative of bees and wasps.  The North American Elm Sawfly was our Bug of the Month for June.  We quickly identified your Sawfly as a Birch Sawfly,
Cimbex femoratus, thanks to NatureSpot which states:  “The solitary larvae feed on Silver Birch leaves between June and September and can grow up to 45mm in length. A black edged bluish stripe runs along the middle of the larva’s back for the length of its body. There is a single row of black dots along the side of the body.”  The site also states:  “Local throughout Britain, not very common” and “Uncommon in Leicestershire and Rutland.”

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Subject: Black Wasp?
Location: Southern Ontario
July 1, 2015 1:03 pm
Hello! We live in Southern Ontario and my dad found this black and pale yellowish wasp in a bush while he was setting up a fence. To me it looks like a Urocerus gigas, but there are some different markings on it that a Urocerus gigas would not normally have, I know its a wood wasp of some sort but im not too sure. That would be helpful if you could identify this bug. Thanks. :)
Signature: Thanks!

Wood Wasp

Wood Wasp

You are close.  You have the genus correct but not the species.  Your Wood Wasp is Urocerus albicornis.

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination