Currently viewing the category: "Hornets and Yellow Jackets"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Are these Hornets?
Location: Methuen, MA
October 20, 2013 6:55 am
Hi Bugman! My 9 -year old daughter spotted this this morning, it’s larger than a football and very well made. Can you please tell me what we are dealing with here? We have three small children.
Signature: Mamacyn

Hornets Nest

Hornets Nest

Dear Mamacyn,
This is indeed a Hornets Nest, and it most likely belongs to Bald Faced Hornets.  Since it is October and the first freeze of the year is not long off, we wouldn’t advise you to take any action as the colony will die with the coming winter.  Hornets do not reuse a nest.  The mated queens will hibernate and begin building new colonies in new locations in the spring.  Hornets are generally not aggressive unless the nest is threatened, so this nest was probably active the entire summer and its inhabitants were content to cohabitate with you and your family to neither species’ detriment.

Thank you Daniel!  I will advise everyone to keep away until we know that they have abandoned the nest.  I’d love to keep it, it’s so pretty.
Thank you again!!
Take care,
Cynthia

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Cicada Killer, Japanese or European hornet?
Location: Grove City, PA
October 17, 2013 7:28 am
This was on my door frame, right outside early in the morning, October 17. It was chilly out and very damp. He seemed pretty chilled and not moving, but when the sun came out and he dried off, he ”woke up” and he really did not like my being anywhere near him. Just wondering if he is anything to worry about.
Signature: Jodi

European Hornet

European Hornet

Hi Jodi,
This is a European Hornet. We wonder if any of our readers can identify this individual as a queen.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: bee vs wasp
Location: Saskatchewan, Canada
October 8, 2013 4:33 pm
Location: Saskatchewan, Canada
Season: October
Hello!
Let me first say, thank you for this website. You have saved me many panic attacks of ’what is the spider in the shower with me and will it kill me’ moments.
Now then, the age-old (laymen’s) question of is it a bee or a wasp.
The photos I am submitting are of a handsome fellow that represents the sort of company I keep during lunch every day. I find them to be quite harmless, rather sociable (sitting on my arm or leg to clean or check out what I am eating), curious and quite handsome (did I say that already?)
To me, this is a bee. I know, not a bumblebee and probably not a honeybee, but to me, this is a bee. Everyone else who sits with me says it is a wasp. Generally, three or four come to visit while we eat outside and I am the only one who is not bothered.
Bee or wasp? I’ll trust your final word.
Signature: Katherine

Yellowjacket

Yellowjacket

Hi Katherine,
This Yellowjacket is a social Wasp closely related to the Hornets.  Yellowjackets are often attracted to picnics and garbage cans with food where they feed on sugary liquids and they return with the nest with meaty proteins to feed the larvae.  See BugGuide for additional information.

Wonderful! Thank you for taking the time to answer me. :)
Since I am so popular with them, I was hoping for some sort of “bee whisper” title. But ‘Mother to Wasps’ works just as well. hahahah.
Thanks again!

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What’s this bug
Location: Coorg hills, India
October 3, 2013 5:45 am
I got stung by this, please identify it
Signature: YC

Unknown Hornet

Greater Banded Hornet

Dear YC,
After some time searching, we believe we have correctly identified your Greater Banded Hornet,
Vespa tropica, thanks to images posted on BlogSpot and TrekNature which states:  “This species is a subterranean wasp. Adults are medium to large sized, dark brown to black and yellowish orange marked on the gaster. This species is very similar to Vespa affinis, but easily distinguished from the latter by bright yellow or yellow orange at the second gastral segment.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: First Fall Day. Fly/Bee/Hornet
Location: SW Michigan, USA
September 24, 2013 5:42 am
Here are a few more pics from my first full fall day foray in my backyard- in the middle of a mature oak forest. I’m sure that the hornet is an eastern Yellow Jacket, but it wasn’t pictured in my guidebook. The fly pictured was out in force on many leaves. The bee is half the size of the larger Bumblebees that I see. Could it be a Digger Bee? I’ve noticed in the last 2 weeks that they seem to nap on my Marigolds. I can actually stroke them with my finger and all they do is raise their middle pair of legs as if to say “leave me alone, I’m napping”. I’ve done this to many of them and they all react the same way.
Signature: d.k.dodge

Yellowjacket

Yellowjacket

Dear d.k. dodge,
Thank you for submitting nine photographs of insects and other bugs that you photographed on the first day of fall.  We are posting the photo of a Yellowjacket because we don’t have many nice close ups of them and your photo is quite detailed.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Wasp?
Location: Central PA
September 10, 2013 2:59 pm
This insect shows up on our covered back porch above the door at night only after the porch light had been on for awhile. I never see them during the day. I believe they live behind the porch light. They are about 1 1/2 – 1 3/4 inches long. My wife thinks they are cicada killers, but I believe they might be scarab hunter wasps. They seem pretty docile and have never stung anyone. I do have a sting allergy and have some reservations about using this door at night. Anyone light you can shed on this would be very much appreciated.
Signature: Rick Davis

European Hornets

European Hornets

Dear Rick,
These are European Hornets, an introduced species that might be negatively impacting native species by preying upon them and displacing them in the food chain.  They might have a nest in the attic.  We have read on BugGuide that they are attracted to lights, so your letter is evidence that is correct.

Dear Daniel,
Thanks for the quick reply.  You certainly nailed this one.  According to the literature you referenced, the nest will move on after the queen dies.  (I made a small donation to your site.)  Thanks again.
Rick

That was very kind of your Rick.  Thanks for the support.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination