Currently viewing the category: "Hornets and Yellow Jackets"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Hoverfly,
Location: Columbus Ohio
September 12, 2016 5:33 pm
Found this on a brick wall outside our middle school in Columbus Ohio. It was big, like a horsefly. The picture looks smaller.
Signature: Thanks, S Zuza

Bald Faced Hornet

Bald Faced Hornet

Dear S Zuza,
Though many Hover Flies mimic stinging bees and wasps, this Bald Faced Hornet is the real deal.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Please identify the big bug in picture
Location: north Georgia mountains
August 26, 2016 6:03 am
Good morning. A friend took the attached photo earlier this week. and has given his explicit permission for me to do with it what I want, including sharing it/using it. Our community is in the North Georgia mountains, and my friend’s home is located in the lower elevations of the neighborhood, adjacent to the golf course.
There have been a lot of yellow-jackets in the area this year, so we’re happy that something might be attacking them. But, what in the heck is that big something?
Thanks in advance for any assistance you are able to provide.
Signature: Edie

Red Footed Cannibalfly eats Yellow Jacket

Red Footed Cannibalfly eats Yellow Jacket

Dear Edie,
The predator in the image is a Red Footed Cannibalfly, a large species of Robber Fly.  While Robber Flies might bite a person who carelessly tried to handle one, they are not aggressive towards humans.  The unnatural position of the wings of the Red Footed Cannibalfly in your image is somewhat disturbing, leading us to speculate that it is no longer alive and possibly the victim of Unnecessary Carnage.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Hornet ID …
Location: Monetville, Ontario, Canada, which is south of Sudbury, Ontario, Canada.
August 11, 2016 10:56 am
We saw these “hornets” August 11, 2016 in the area of Monetville, Ontario, Canada, which is south of Sudbury, Ontario, Canada.
They were operating like dive bombers attacking and carrying away flies.
Accurate attacking the flies but did not appear to be bothering people.
Signature: Paul Kehoe

Bald Faced Hornet

Bald Faced Hornet

Dear Paul,
This is a Bald Faced Hornet, a species of social wasp.  Most adult wasps feed on nectar and other sugary substances, like ripe fruit or sap.  We suspect the Flies they were catching are being taken back to the nest to feed the larvae.  According to BugGuide:  “Adults are common on flowers and take nectar. Adults feed pre-chewed insects to larvae. Also are carnivorous and eat fruit.”

Comment from our Facebook Page
Brenda Russell Armstrong
August 12 at 2:30pm
One of my favourites. Many years ago living in northern BC by the Stikine River we were cutting fish for drying and the black flies, horse flies, etc. were bad. Then the BF Hornets arrived and began capturing and processing the flies for their winter larder. There were catchers, and others that trimmed the various (inedible?) bits and others that wrapped the carcass into a leaf from a nearby wild apple tree and then turned the bundle over to other hornets that flew them off to the nest for storage. Not making this up. Would find it hard to believe if I hadn’t seen it myself. Any one else see something similar?

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Swallowtail Butterfly Alaska
Location: Anchorage, Alaska
July 11, 2016 6:10 pm
Here is the ONLY photo of one of the yellow Swallowtail butterflies that I have seen in Alaska. I can’t believe I don’t have more pictures. I will be on the look out for more photos now that I know you are interested.
I think have seen at least 2 different species of yellow swallowtail here in Anchorage. This is one of them, and please correct me if I’m wrong, but it is the Canadian Tiger Swallowtail. (Taken in Anchorage, Alaska May 2010)
Signature: MsRobin

Canadian Tiger Swallowtail

Canadian Tiger Swallowtail

Dear MsRobin,
We are very happy we decided today to look back over the past two weeks to see if we missed anything in the 100s of unanswered emails, and we discovered the request we made from you, unopened in the mailbox.  We agree that this is most likely a Canadian Tiger Swallowtail,
Papilio canadensis.  You may enjoy our own account of trying to get a decent image of the Western Tiger Swallowtails that frequent our office garden.

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Giant wasp in NJ
Location: New Jersey
May 13, 2016 5:09 pm
Hey bugman,
I pump gas in Northern New Jersey, and i found this big guy behind a gas door. I ended up removing the gas cap and filling the car before i even noticed, and was too afraid to put the cap back on.
I managed to snap the fist photo while in was still on the gas cap.
I was able to get it out with a broom without killing it, and snapped a second photo. I brought it to a safe distance and set it free.
It was a out an inch to an inch and a half long, yellow and black patterned abdomen, with black and blood red spattered on the head and back
Can you help me identify this type of bee/ wasp thing?
Signature: Sincerily, cstar4004

European Hornet

European Hornet

Dear cstar4004,
This is an introduced European Hornet,
Vespa crabro, a species that has been established in North America since the end of the 19th Century.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Big bee/wasp
Location: South central indiana
April 28, 2016 7:40 pm
We had this big bee/wasp fly into our home. It almost was if he was drunk. He would fly into a corner than crash to the ground. Then lay for a few minute. Get up and fly for ten seconds then crash.
We are in south central Indiana.
Signature: Paul

European Hornet

European Hornet

Dear Paul,
This is a European Hornet,
Vespa crabo, and judging by the time of year, the circumstances under which you found her, and her behavior, we believe she is a Queen who just ended her hibernation and is about to begin a new colony.  You should release her.  You can read more about European Hornets on BugGuide.

Daniel, thanks for the answer and confirmation. About 15 minutes after I sent the email I concluded the same thing. I gave her an apple to feed off of and then released her today. She seemed much more energetic. It is amazing how much of he apple slices she ate.
Thanks for the feedback. Hopefully the nest she builds will be away from the house.
Have a good weekend.
Paul

Apple eaten by European Hornet

Apple eaten by European Hornet

Thanks for the update Paul.  We will be tagging this posting with the Bug Humanitarian Award for your kindness to the lower beasts.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination