Currently viewing the category: "Wasps and Hornets"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What’s that ?
Location: Seen in Tampa, FL 9/28/2014 in town
September 28, 2014 4:02 pm
Hi bugman
What’s the bug on this picture ?
Thanks
Signature: Fred

Spotted Oleander Caterpillar Moth

Spotted Oleander Caterpillar Moth

Dear Fred,
The Spotted Oleander Caterpillar Moth,
Empyreuma pugione, is one of the Tiger Moths that benefit from mimicry because they look like stinging Wasps.  This black bodied, orange winged beauty most closely resembles Spider Wasps, especially the Tarantula Hawks.  According to BugGuide:  “The spotted oleander caterpillar is a recent immigrant to the US from the Caribbean, first recorded in Florida in Boca Raton, Palm Beach County, in February 1978.”

Tarantula Hawk with Prey

Tarantula Hawk with Prey

 

Rachel Carpenter liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Catapillar identification
Location: Rochdale-manchester-England
September 27, 2014 6:09 am
At home I have at least half a dozen catapillars and am feeding them apple at the moment but I am unsure of the species that the catapillar is;consequent not being able to feed them ther favourite food.if you can reply as soon as that would be fantastic so I can understand what to feed them :) also the catapillar has an orange tail and blue body with a black and orange head ,it also has random black spots speckled over its body
Signature: Alex:L

Gooseberry Sawfly Larva

Willow Sawfly Larva

Dear Alex:L,
Though it looks like a caterpillar, this is not a caterpillar, but rather a Sawfly Larva.  We believe we may have correctly identified it as a Gooseberry Sawfly Larva,
Nematus ribesii, thanks to this image on FlickR.  According to DownGardenServices:  “The caterpillar-like larva is light green with black dots and a shiny, black head. If disturbed it clings to the edge of the leaf while bending into a S-shape. All of the leaves can disappear with only the stalks and a few veins remaining. Check any leaves beyond them and the larvae will be there, so they can be rubbed off.  The lack of foliage weakens the bush and it produces a very poor crop the following year.”  An even closer match is the Willow Sawfly, , which is pictured on PBase and Wikimedia Commons.

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What’s this bug?
Location: Spring Grove, Pa (south central PA)
September 24, 2014 5:25 pm
We found several of these in a pile of firewood in our backyard. They have bored many holes in the logs.
Signature: Michele

Stump Stabber

Stump Stabber

Hi Michele,
This Giant Ichneumon in the genus
Megarhyssa is commonly called a Stump Stabber.  The female lays her eggs in wood that is infested with the wood boring larvae of Wood Wasps and the larval Stump Stabber parazitizes the larvae of the Wood Wasps.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bodacious, Beautiful Wasp
Location: Brevard County (Titusville), FL
September 17, 2014 7:01 pm
Hello Big Folks,
We found this big, bodacious, beautiful wasp today (Sept. 17, 2014) while doing landscape work for a client. It’s big, nearly 2″ long and was very docile and tolerant as I hovered around it, mere inches away, taking photos and videos as it walked around on an Indian hawthorn shrub.
Can you tell me what it is? And everything there is to know about it? (<–ok, I realize that may be an unreasonable request, but this guy is awesome!)
Thanks so much, and also, thanks for this wonderful site. There is so much fascinating stuff here!
Signature: LG

Unknown Wasp

Unknown Wasp

Dear LG,
We had thought this would be an easy identification, but we are not having any luck, so we decided to enlist the assistance of Eric Eaton.  Initially we thought that this might be a Thread-Waisted Wasp in the family Sphecidae, but we struck out, though
Eremnophila aureonotata on BugGuide does have similar markings on the face.  In the interest of trying to post additional submissions this morning, we are going live with your request, waiting for Eric Eaton to get back to us, and hopefully provide you with an identification soon.  Perhaps some of our readers will have ideas.

Eric Eaton confirms family and gets more specific.
Daniel:
You are correct, this is a katydid hunter wasp, Sphex habenus.  It is not one of the more commonly-photographed species.
Species Sphex habenus – BugGuide.Net
Eric

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Ant or mite?
Location: Sonoran Desert, Arizona
September 16, 2014 6:01 pm
Is this a Thistledown Velvet Ant? I stopped to take a break and my eye caught this little critter moving rather quickly on the trail. When I bent down to get a closer look, it stopped and put its rear end up at me. I moved to get a view of the front, but everywhere I went, this little guy turned its butt to me. This was the only photo it would let me get! This was on a trail at Granite Mountain in the Rio Verde Foothills area northeast of Scottsdale, in the McDowell Sonoran Preserve.
Signature: Paige

Velvet Ant

Velvet Ant

Dear Paige,
We are confident that this is a Velvet Ant, but we cannot state for certain that it is a Thistledown Velvet Ant.

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Subject: Bug Identification
Location: Suffolk, VA 23432
September 13, 2014 6:11 pm
Can you tell me what this insect is?it looks lake a large black and red ant.
Signature: Thank you! John Lee

Cowkiller

Cow Killer

Dear John Lee,
Though this Cow Killer,
Dasymutilla occidentalis, is in the family with members commonly called Velvet Ants, they are actually flightless female wasps that are reported to have a very painful sting.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination