Currently viewing the category: "Wasps and Hornets"
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Subject: honey wasp
Location: guatemala
December 5, 2016 11:02 am
i would like to know if the wasp on the picture is the honey wasp from mexico, the one that pollinates avocado
Signature: Alejandra Gutiérrez

Honey Wasp

Mexican Honey Wasp

Hi Alejandra,
Our first impression was that this is a Paper Wasp in the subfamily Polistinae, but when we researched the Mexican Honey Wasp,
Brachygastra mellifica, on BugEric, we learned that it is a member of the Paper Wasp subfamily.  Your individual does appear to be a Mexican Honey Wasp.  We have some nice images of the nest of Mexican Honey Wasps in our archives.

Daniel ! Thank you very much for the information you share, it has been very helpful for our research.

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Subject: Australian wasp
Location: Hornsby NSW
December 3, 2016 1:03 am
My wife captured this shot in our front garden. I wonder if the wasp removed the huntsman spiders legs for transport purposes?
Signature: Australian wasp

Spider Wasp and Huntsman Prey

Spider Wasp and Huntsman Prey

We get several very dramatic submissions from Australia each year of Spider Wasps in the family Pompilidae with Huntsman Spider prey.  The female Spider Wasps stings and paralyzes the Huntsman Spider and then drags it back to her burrow where she lays an egg on the paralyzed Spider.  When the egg hatches, the wasp larva feeds on the living but paralyzed Spider.  It appears that your Spider Wasp has removed the legs of the Huntsman Spider by biting them off in order to make transportation easier.  Based on images posted to the Brisbane Insect site, we believe your Spider Wasp is in the genus Fabriogenia.

Spider Wasp and Huntsman Prey

Spider Wasp and Huntsman Prey

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this??
Location: Fillmore, California
November 25, 2016 4:55 pm
Can you tell me what kind of bug this is I found crawling in my backyard?
Signature: Kristianne

Velvet Ant

Velvet Ant

Dear Kristianne,
This is a Velvet Ant, a flightless female wasp in the genus
Dasymutilla.  Velvet Ants should be handled with extreme caution as they are reported to have a very painful sting.  Based on images posted to BugGuide, we believe your Velvet Ant might be Dasymutilla sackenii.

Velvet Ant

Velvet Ant

 

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Location: Morocco
November 24, 2016 10:09 am
Dear Daniel Marlos:
Just happened upon your site and decided to let you know about my own minor efforts in entomology. I spend a good deal of my time (retired) in Morocco and one thing I do is take photos of all sorts of subjects, including plenty of ‘bug’ pictures – especially bees and butterflies. Many are as yet to be uploaded since I’m trying to learn the basics about taxonomy but, alas, it’s slow going!
… Thanks for any help or suggestions you might offer.
Signature: Jearld Moldenhauer

Scarab Hunter Wasp, we believe

Scarab Hunter Wasp, we believe

Dear Jearld,
WE believe the hairy Hymenopteran is a Scarab Hunter Wasp in the family Scoliidae.  Here is an image that looks similar that is posted to PicClick, but we can’t find any information on the species.  Though the colors are quite different, the body morphology of this
Scolia dubia posted to BugGuide looks similar to that of your individual.  Your other wasp might be a Paper Wasp in the subfamily Polistinae.

Possibly Paper Wasp

Possibly Paper Wasp

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Beautiful Wasp
Location: Chiriqui, panama
November 12, 2016 8:27 pm
Hi Bugman, I saw this wasp at a gas station in Panama in October. A tour guide said it was a spider hawk but the internet pictures of those show they have orange wings. The closest thing I found to this is the great black wasp but the wings are not the same shape. Any ideas?
Signature: Lori Mailloux

Spider Wasp

Spider Wasp

Dear Lori,
We agree with the tour guide that this is a Spider Wasp in the family Pompilidae, and Tarantula Hawks belong to a genera of Spider Wasps, and many, but not all, have orange wings.  Alas, we have not had any luck finding any matching images online.

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Subject: Kids study
Location: Lower Mainland Bc Canada
November 10, 2016 4:36 pm
Hello;
I have a son very interested in learning about animals and bugs and insects. he is always on the look out in my backyard for something new to discover. Today he found a bug I had never seen and we wondered if you could help and identify it for us. I have attached a picture. M
Signature: Tamara

Ichneumon:  Possibly Pimpla sanguinipes

Ichneumon: Possibly Pimpla sanguinipes

Dear Tamara,
This is a female Ichneumon Wasp, a parasitoid that preys upon insects and other arthropods and is generally very prey specific.  This is a large family with over 5000 identified species in North America and an additional estimated 3000 species according to BugGuide.  Based on this BugGuide image, also from British Columbia, we suspect it might be
Pimpla sanguinipes.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination