Currently viewing the category: "Wasps and Hornets"
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Subject: Weird Bug
Location: Harrisburg PA
May 23, 2015 5:46 am
Dear WTB:
I was hoping you could tell me what kind of insect this is. I found it hanging out on my screen door this morning and it scared the crap outta me! It’s all different colors and has this long tail? It’s not a stinger because it could move it. All together it’s probably about 8-12 inches long. I hope you can ID it for me! Thanks so much!
Signature: Audrey

Stump Stabber

Stump Stabber

Dear Audrey,
This is a Giant Ichneumon in the genus
Megarhyssa, a group that is commonly called Stump Stabbers because the female uses her lengthy ovipositor to lay eggs beneath the surface of trees infested with the wood boring larvae of Wood Wasps like the Pigeon Horntail.  We have never heard of a person being stung by a Giant Icheumon in the genus Megarhyssa, so we consider them to be harmless, though there is one group of Ichneumons in the genus Ophion with shorter ovipositors that are reported to sting people.

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Wasp or Beatle?
Location: Covina California
May 21, 2015 6:35 pm
Found this in the backyard crawling into a hole, never seen one before. It’s quite interesting. It really looks like a beetle mixed with a wasp. 05-21-2015
Signature: Joshua

Tarantula Hawk Carnage

Tarantula Hawk Carnage

Dear Joshua,
We are afraid to ask why this Tarantula Hawk is no longer crawling into a hole.  Tarantula Hawks are Spider Wasps in the family Pompilidae.  We will be tagging this posting as Unnecessary Carnage.

Tarantula Hawk Carnage

Tarantula Hawk Carnage

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Subject: Hornet or Wasp
Location: Kannapolis NC
May 20, 2015 11:40 pm
This giant thing was trying to make a nest in my paper lamp! It was huge and looked pretty dangerous…we let it go outside…maybe not the best decision?!
May 2015 location NC.
Signature: MForrest

European Hornet

European Hornet

Dear MForrest,
This is a European Hornet,
Vespa crabro, and introduced species.  You may read more about the European Hornet on the Penn State Entomology page where it states:  “”The European or giant hornet is an introduced species first reported in the United States in 1840 in New York. Currently, its geographical range extends from the Northeastern states west to the Dakotas, and south to Louisiana and Florida. It belongs to a family of wasps called the vespids, which encompass all of the yellowjackets including the bald-faced hornets. Technically, the European hornet is the only true hornet in North America and is large and will aggressively defend their nests. Homeowners should be cautious when attempting to manage this hornet.

Thank you!
I have a young child.  This makes me very concerned…we will be cautious and keep an eye out for anymore.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Orange Abdomen – Plant eggs in stems?
Location: Mira, Venice, Italy
May 17, 2015 12:26 am
Hi dear Bugman,
On these roses these insects, I counted 4, proceeds undisturbed to crack the stems, leaving behind a kind of scar. I could go as fat as touching them. The have this very bright orange abdomen and very dark rest of the body and wings. The length is about 1-1.2cm. Apparently the upload does not work. I posted two pics:
https://www.flickr.com/photos/maurillio/17557563078/in/dateposted-public/
https://www.flickr.com/photos/maurillio/17122998534/in/dateposted-public/
I’m really curios about this. Glad to find a service like this online. Hope it works :)
Thanks,
Mauro.
Signature: Lord of the manor

Rose Sawflies

Large Rose Sawflies

Dear Mauro, Lord of the Manor,
These are Sawflies, nonstinging relatives of Bees and Wasps whose larvae feed on plants, sometimes eating the leaves, and sometimes feeding on other portions of the host species.  We quickly identified your Sawflies as Large Rose Sawflies,
Arge pagana, on the Dutch site tuin-thijs.com where it states:  “The Large Rose Sawfly saws a hole in a Rose (plant) and lays eggs.  The larvae eat the rose. But usually there is not much damage,  because the larva has many natural enemies.”  On Nature Spot it states:  ” Like all sawflies, female Large Rose Sawflies are in possession of a little saw. With it they make parallel cuts in the fresh shoots of the host plant. In the cut a bunch of eggs is deposited. The larvae hatch quite quickly and move in a group to the freshly emerged leaves. The young larvae (yellow with black spots) stay together for quite some time, capable of eating the entire shoot. Older larvae lead a more single life and eat from older leaves as well.”   We also located an Italian site, Agraria.org that might have helpful information for you. 

WOW!
Thanks Daniel for the quick and comprehensive answer! I took pictures of the larvae last year without knowing they were Sawflies.
Thanks also for the great service you are providing!
Mauro.

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Subject: Colourfull fly
Location: Portugal
May 16, 2015 11:37 pm
What kind of fly is this?
Never saw this one before….
Signature: Tineke

Cuckoo Wasp

Cuckoo Wasp

Dear Tineke,
This looks like a Cuckoo Wasp to us, but the red abdomen is something we do not see in North America.  It might be
 Hedychrum rutilans which is pictured on Shutterstock.  There is also some information on Chrysis.net.  Cuckoo Wasps can curl up for protection when disturbed or threatened as your image indicates.

Thank you very much Daniel for your quick respons…
Its a beautiful insect, it was dead when I found it and I keep it in a little box.
Best regards,
Tineke

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: curious…
Location: north nj
May 12, 2015 9:26 pm
Can’t figure out if this is a European wasp, or a Japanese wasp. I’m in North Jersey.
Signature: adam minick

European Hornet

European Hornet

Hi Adam,
This is a European Hornet and we believe it is a queen.  According to BugGuide:  “Queens emerge from hibernation during the spring, and they search for a suitable location in which to start a new nest. They build the nest with chewed wood pulp, and a few eggs are laid in individual paper cells; these eggs develop into non-reproductive workers. When 5-10 workers have emerged, they take over the care of the nest, and the rest of queen’s life is devoted solely to egg laying. The workers capture insects, bringing them back to the nest to feed the brood. Workers need more high-energy sugary foods such as sap and nectar, and hornet larvae are able to exude a sugary liquid which the workers can feed on.  The nest reaches its peak size towards mid September. At this time the queen lays eggs that develop into males (drones) and new queens, she then dies shortly after. The new queens and males mate during a ‘nuptial flight’, after which the males die, and the newly mated queens seek out suitable places in which to hibernate; the old nest is never re-used.”

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination