Currently viewing the category: "Wasps and Hornets"
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Subject: What is this???
Location: South Texas
October 22, 2014 10:42 pm
I see these bugs all over my door at night where I live. What is it?? Do they bite/sting? Help..
Signature: Hannah Gohlke

Ichneumon

Ichneumon

Hi Hannah,
This is an Ichneumon, a member of a large and diverse family of parasitic wasps.  Most Ichneumons are harmless, but some are capable of stinging, and this does appear to be on of those Ichneumons that sting.

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Subject: Insect Identification
Location: South East UK
October 20, 2014 10:54 am
Afternoon,
Found the attached against my curtains this evening
I literally have no idea what it is or what it could be and have been searching images for the last hour trying to find out
Wondering if you could let me know what it is and if it is native to the uk? i have never seen anything like this and i have lived here all my life (some 27 years)
Signature: Thank you in advance

Ichneumon

Ichneumon

This is some species of Ichneumon, a member of a family of parasitic wasps.  Ichneumons prey upon many agricultural pests and most Ichneumons are very host specific, preying upon a single species or genus, though some prey upon entire families of insects and arthropods.  Ichnuemons are a highly diverse family with many members, and we cannot say for certain if you have a native species.  Ichneumons are sometimes introduced to prey upon other introduced pests.

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Cowkiller

Cow Killer

Subject: Cowkiller
Location: south Louisiana
October 10, 2014 8:15 pm
What’s up Bug man! I caught a red velvet ant/wasp in my back yard while I was mowing and I put it in a container. What can I feed it?
Signature: Jon Hite

Dear Jon,
Velvet Ants are flightless female wasps, and most adult wasps take nectar or other sweet, sugary liquids as food.  According to BugGuide:  “Adults (males?) take nectar.”  Perhaps honey will suffice.

Juan Figueroa, Racheal Sedmack, Rob Nease, Tim Rogers, Susie Boyd, Kyla Gunter Gatlin liked this post
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Subject: What’s that ?
Location: Seen in Tampa, FL 9/28/2014 in town
September 28, 2014 4:02 pm
Hi bugman
What’s the bug on this picture ?
Thanks
Signature: Fred

Spotted Oleander Caterpillar Moth

Spotted Oleander Caterpillar Moth

Dear Fred,
The Spotted Oleander Caterpillar Moth,
Empyreuma pugione, is one of the Tiger Moths that benefit from mimicry because they look like stinging Wasps.  This black bodied, orange winged beauty most closely resembles Spider Wasps, especially the Tarantula Hawks.  According to BugGuide:  “The spotted oleander caterpillar is a recent immigrant to the US from the Caribbean, first recorded in Florida in Boca Raton, Palm Beach County, in February 1978.”

Tarantula Hawk with Prey

Tarantula Hawk with Prey

thank you for the info, now i know the name of what’s eating my plants in a caterpillar form… !
have a great day
Fred

 

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Subject: Catapillar identification
Location: Rochdale-manchester-England
September 27, 2014 6:09 am
At home I have at least half a dozen catapillars and am feeding them apple at the moment but I am unsure of the species that the catapillar is;consequent not being able to feed them ther favourite food.if you can reply as soon as that would be fantastic so I can understand what to feed them :) also the catapillar has an orange tail and blue body with a black and orange head ,it also has random black spots speckled over its body
Signature: Alex:L

Gooseberry Sawfly Larva

Willow Sawfly Larva

Dear Alex:L,
Though it looks like a caterpillar, this is not a caterpillar, but rather a Sawfly Larva.  We believe we may have correctly identified it as a Gooseberry Sawfly Larva,
Nematus ribesii, thanks to this image on FlickR.  According to DownGardenServices:  “The caterpillar-like larva is light green with black dots and a shiny, black head. If disturbed it clings to the edge of the leaf while bending into a S-shape. All of the leaves can disappear with only the stalks and a few veins remaining. Check any leaves beyond them and the larvae will be there, so they can be rubbed off.  The lack of foliage weakens the bush and it produces a very poor crop the following year.”  An even closer match is the Willow Sawfly, , which is pictured on PBase and Wikimedia Commons.

 

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Subject: What’s this bug?
Location: Spring Grove, Pa (south central PA)
September 24, 2014 5:25 pm
We found several of these in a pile of firewood in our backyard. They have bored many holes in the logs.
Signature: Michele

Stump Stabber

Stump Stabber

Hi Michele,
This Giant Ichneumon in the genus
Megarhyssa is commonly called a Stump Stabber.  The female lays her eggs in wood that is infested with the wood boring larvae of Wood Wasps and the larval Stump Stabber parazitizes the larvae of the Wood Wasps.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination