Currently viewing the category: "Wasps and Hornets"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this bug
Location: Lake Kiowa, TX
July 4, 2015 4:20 pm
Hi Bugman!
My kids & I are visiting north Texas and we came across this extremely large flying bug. I’m including 2 pics, one for scale.
Signature: Curious Traveller

Deceased Cicada Killer

Deceased Cicada Killer

Dear Curious Traveller [sic],
This magnificent Cicada Killer looks quite dead and we can’t help but to wonder what happened during your encounter to take it from being an “extremely large flying bug” to one that will fly no more.  Cicada Killers are not aggressive and we have never received an authenticated account of a person being stung by a Cicada Killer.

Jessica M. Schemm, Regis Swope, Bonnie Whitt, Marieke Bruss liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Insect Nest
Location: Porto Alegre
June 26, 2015 11:50 am
Hello!
I recently visited the Jardim Botanico de Porto Alegre in Brazil, and I saw this nest up in a tree there. It’s about two feet tall. I’ve looked up both insect and bird nests, and I can’t seem to find a visual match online. It has thorns on it, and there weren’t any other structures like it anywhere, so I don’t think it’s a feature of the tree itself.
Signature: Brynna

What's That Nest???

What’s That Nest???

Dear Brynna,
This nest appears to be made of mud and it appears that it is quite large.  We wish you had estimated its dimensions.  Like you, we would speculate that it was created either by a social insect or a bird.  Our initial search did not produce any results.  Perhaps our Brazilian counterpart, Cesar Crash of Insetologia will have some ideas.

Update:  July 4, 2015
Thanks to a comment from a reader, we were directed to this image of a Paper Wasp Nest on FlickR.

Sue Dougherty, Mike Coughlin, Corey Hanson, Hayley Nasman, Jacob Helton, Nicole Momaney liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Large winged insect.
Location: UK. North west England. PR5 0JY.
July 3, 2015 5:12 am
Hello.
Could you please identify the insect from my garden? It’s wing span was approx.. 50 mm. and it’s body length approx… 40 mm. As can be seen on the photos, it had a single ovoid cream coloured mark on it’s back. It appeared to be in distress. Many thanks. Barry Lewis.
it’s wing
Signature: Barry Lewis

Birch Sawfly

Birch Sawfly

Dear Barry,
Because of it resemblance to North American species, we quickly recognized your insect as a Sawfly in the family Cimbicidae, a non-stinging relative of bees and wasps.  The North American Elm Sawfly was our Bug of the Month for June.  We quickly identified your Sawfly as a Birch Sawfly,
Cimbex femoratus, thanks to NatureSpot which states:  “The solitary larvae feed on Silver Birch leaves between June and September and can grow up to 45mm in length. A black edged bluish stripe runs along the middle of the larva’s back for the length of its body. There is a single row of black dots along the side of the body.”  The site also states:  “Local throughout Britain, not very common” and “Uncommon in Leicestershire and Rutland.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Wasp identification
Location: Vail, az
June 30, 2015 10:02 pm
Hello,
On a hot and sunny tucson summer day I found this curiosity burrowed in my grass, apparently trying to keep cool. I know it’s not a tarantula hawk from the antenna, but it was making stinging-like motion with its abdomen on the stick I used to relocate away from me and my children. Wish I had a clearer picture of the mouth, but, what say you?
Thank you for your wonderful site!
Signature: Jennifer

Scoliid Wasp

Scarab Hunter Wasp

Dear Jennifer,
Thanks for the compliment.  We believe we have correctly identified your Scoliid Wasp as Triscolia ardens based on images that are posted to BugGuide.  Alas, BugGuide does not provide any information on the species, and the genus information is also very limited on BugGuide except for “a single species in our area, 2 total”, however, the family page on BugGuide indicates common names “Flower Wasps, Mammoth Wasps, Scarab Hawks, Scarab Hunters” and provides this information:  “Larvae are parasitoids of ground-dwelling scarab grubs, esp. Phyllophaga; adults take nectar.  Life Cycle  Female digs down to the host grub, stings it, and lays an egg on the paralyzed grub.”  Perhaps your wasp is hunting for Scarab Beetle larvae in the lawn.  Scarab Hunters are not aggressive wasps, but because you were thoughtful enough to relocate it due to concerns for your children’s safety rather than to kill it, we are tagging your submission with the Bug Humanitarian Award

Scoliid Wasp

Scarab Hunter Wasp

 

David Bernstein, Alisha Bragg, Anna Carreon liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Black Wasp?
Location: Southern Ontario
July 1, 2015 1:03 pm
Hello! We live in Southern Ontario and my dad found this black and pale yellowish wasp in a bush while he was setting up a fence. To me it looks like a Urocerus gigas, but there are some different markings on it that a Urocerus gigas would not normally have, I know its a wood wasp of some sort but im not too sure. That would be helpful if you could identify this bug. Thanks. :)
Signature: Thanks!

Wood Wasp

Wood Wasp

You are close.  You have the genus correct but not the species.  Your Wood Wasp is Urocerus albicornis.

Melissa Covey, Martin Lawrence, Ann Levitsky, Andrea Leonard Drummond liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Blue Bug?
Location: Philadelphia, PA
July 1, 2015 11:10 am
Location: just outside of Philadelphia, PA
Date: 6/29/15 Summer
Time: 9:15 am
I have a gift for finding strange bugs. Two different Sphynx Moths, odd grasshoppers, albino spiders and such. This is my first blue bug. :-)
Signature: Andrea

Blue Mud Wasp

Blue Mud Wasp

Dear Andrea,
This is a Blue Mud Dauber or Blue Mud Wasp,
Chalybion californicum.  According to BugGuide:  “A large, active, blue-black wasp with irridescent blue wings. Frequents flowers for nectar and buildings for nest sites.”

Ann Levitsky, Andrea Leonard Drummond liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination