Currently viewing the category: "Wasps and Hornets"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Lg flying bug orange iridescent wings San Diego
Location: San Diego County
September 28, 2016 7:43 pm
Today I was atop a huge 20ft Boulder at the summit of 3600ft in San Diego County.
This flying insect (seemed like a small humming bird) launched several assaults from hundreds of feet away at me, never really close. Displayed quite the acrobatic maneuvers. What is it?
Signature: Buzzed by big ufo

Tarantula Hawk

Tarantula Hawk

Dear Buzzed by big ufo,
Though your image lacks clarity, this Tarantula Hawk in unmistakable.  Tarantula Hawks are large Spider Wasps that generally have black bodies with bright orange wings.  Though they are not aggressive toward humans, they are reported to have an extremely painful sting.  Female Tarantula Hawks hunt Tarantulas, stinging them to paralyze, but not kill them.  The paralyzed Tarantula is then dragged back to an underground burrow where it is buried after the Tarantula Hawk lays an egg.  When the egg hatches, the larval wasp feeds on the still living, but paralyzed Tarantula that acts as a source of fresh (not dried out) food.

Daniel,
I’ve attached additional photos.
Also, this was aggressive to show its displeasure,  although I was 50-100ft from its origin, but it may be due to my wearing a bright orange shirt…
Thanks,
Thanks so much.
This one does have a much larger body than most.
—Jim

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Big winged black bug with long tail?
Location: Alfalfa, Oregon
September 26, 2016 8:51 am
Location: central Oregon
Seen: September 25, 2016
Signature: Sandy

Black Horntail

Black Horntail

Dear Sandy,
This is a female Horntail, a non-stinging relative of wasps that uses her long ovipositor to lay eggs beneath the bark of trees.  We believe your black Horntail is in the genus Sirex based on BugGuide images.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Great Golden Digger Wasp
Location: Faribault County, Minnesota
September 24, 2016 11:36 am
Greeting, Awesome WTB Volunteers!
Here’s the photos of the Great Golden Digger Wasp I promised to send. I took these photos that same summer, August 2013, as the Great Black Wasp photos. I did see them both at the same time in my Rain Garden, though never close enough to get them in the same photo!
The detail fascinates me in these photos! The abdomen appears “furrier” than on the Great Black, the mouth pieces are more noticeable, and the legs spikes are definitely prominent. (Yes, I know, I’m using non-scientific jargon; as the saying goes, “I’m not a scientist …”).
Hope these photos help enhance your archives. They are indeed gorgeous gentle giants!
Blessings,
Wanda
Signature: Wanda J. Kothlow

Great Golden Digger Wasp

Great Golden Digger Wasp

Dear Wanda,
We are so thrilled you have solved your problem of submitting your images.  Since they started coming through a few days ago, you have provided our archives with such excellent images.  They are high resolution, perfectly focused and marvelously composed.  These Great Golden Digger Wasp images are amazing.  It is interesting that you are visually comparing the Great Golden Digger Wasp,
Sphex ichneumoneus, to the Great Black Wasp, Sphex pensylvanicus, because they are members of the same genus.

Great Golden Digger Wasp

Great Golden Digger Wasp

Greetings, Daniel!
I’m glad the issue re: sending images is resolved as well. I have photos of several insects I’ve identified through various resources, and many of those might be beneficial additions to your archives. Then I have countless more photos of insects I still need help identifying with which I hope you can assist.
When I saw the Great Golden Digger Wasp I had already seen the Great Black Wasp so my first thought was how similar they were. Having identified the Great Black, I knew where to look for the identification for the Great Golden Digger Wasp. I do enjoy learning and remembering various resources to use as tools. In the case of these two Great Wasps, I had a book I borrowed from the library and the pictures provided the identification. I think you know one of the authors of that book, a Mr. Eric R. Eaton. I believe he provided additional insight into the identification for my Long-Horned Bee submission earlier this summer.
Speaking of which, I think I might have a photo of the male Long-Horned Bee. I’ll take another look to see if the antennae are longer than on the female.
I’ll cull through my photos to see what else I’ve identified that you might be able to add to your growing archives. And of course what I need help identifying.
Blessings to one and all!
Wanda

Great Golden Digger Wasp

Great Golden Digger Wasp

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: identify an insect
Location: bahrain
September 21, 2016 9:59 pm
Want to know the name and what should do if bite ?
Signature: nilmi

Paper Wasps

Arabian Paper Wasps

Dear Nilmi,
These are Wasps, and we believe they may be Paper Wasps in the genus
Polistes.  Paper Wasps are social wasps, and though they are not aggressive, they might sting if their nest is disturbed.  If you are prone to allergic reactions, you may need to see a physician, but for most people, a sting will cause nothing more than local swelling and sensitivity.  We believe because of the bright yellow color, your Paper Wasps might be Polistes wattii which is pictured on both pBase and BirdsoMan where it is identified as the Arabian Paper Wasp.  Your image is awesome.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: paper wasp and goldenrod
Location: Troy, VA
September 23, 2016 12:28 pm
Hi Daniel,
I thought you might like this for your goldenroad meadow. I believe the wasp is some kind of paper wasp. The goldenrod by my house is mostly attracting wasps. I haven’t seen much else on it so far
Signature: Grace Pedalino

Paper Wasp

Paper Wasp

Dear Grace,
Thanks for contributing to our Goldenrod Meadow tag.  We agree that this is a Paper Wasp in the genus
Polistes, possibly Polistes annularis which is pictured on BugGuide.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Great Black Wasp
Location: Faribault County, Minnesota
September 21, 2016 3:09 pm
Greetings, Daniel et al!
To test whether or not my queries can get through as successful submissions, I’m sending photos I’ve identified as a Great Black Wasp.
These photos were taken in my Rain Garden way back in August of 2013. I was so excited the first time I saw this magnificent creature! I did not know what it was and called it a giant flying ant and tried to do some research. I eventually figured out it was a Great Black Wasp. My first photos were blurry and off center so I kept hoping I would see it again to take more pictures. The milkweed in my garden proved irresistible and the wasp did return allowing me to get these better photos.
I’ve seen the Great Black Wasp each summer since then, though not as frequently. I was gone much of Summer 2015 and this year the humidity has kept me out of the garden more than I like.
These photos are slightly smaller in size than the others I’ve been trying to send through without success. Does this site have a limit to submission size? Maybe that is my issue …
Blessings to all,
Signature: Wanda J. Kothlow

Great Black Wasp

Great Black Wasp

Wow Wanda,
Your images of a Great Black Wasp,
Sphex pensylvanicus, are absolutely gorgeous.  We wonder if your problem was related to huge file size.  The detail on these images is phenomenal, even after we reduced them to a web friendly size.  According to BugGuide:  “Provision nests (in burrow in soft earth) with Katydids or grasshoppers. (Univ. Florida lists: Tettigoniidae in genera Microcentrum and Scudderia.) Usually about three are placed in a nest.”

Great Black Wasp

Great Black Wasp

Hi Daniel,
Thank you! The Great Black Wasp photos I sent went through just fine, so what you received is “my original” in all its glory. The combined total in size for the Great Black Wasp was just under 6 MB. The Long-Horned Bee submission earlier this summer was closer to 7.5 MB. For my future submissions I’ll check file sizes. If need be, I’ll compress them to keep my combined total submission size under 8 MB.
I was hoping you would like the photos of the Great Black Wasp. I thought you would like to add them to your photo archives. I truly was excited to see this creature; when feeding on the milkweed the Great Black is quite a sight to behold, almost mesmerizing! I have some fine photos of the Great Golden Digger Wasp as well which I can send.
Both large wasps really are gentle giants. All of the insects I’ve encountered in my garden have proven to be non-aggressive toward humans, so I have been using that reality as an opportunity to educate the residents here at the apartments. My photos help make the point quite nicely. “Aren’t you afraid of getting stung?” they ask. “Nope,” I reply. “In all my years of gardening I’ve never had an issue with any of the wasps, flies, or bees I find on my plants or in the earth. They do their thing, I do my thing, and we get along just fine.”
Blessings, Daniel!
Wanda J. Kothlow

Great Black Wasp

Great Black Wasp

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination