Currently viewing the category: "Walkingsticks"
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Subject: Only curiosity…
Location: Jarabacoa, Dominican Republic
April 15, 2014 7:24 am
Many warm greetings from the Dominican Republic. I saw this beautiful insect resting over the ceiling at the country house of a friend. All the time we spent on the terrace, this curious insect remained in that position. If it’s possible, can Whatsthatbug can give me any information on this peculiar insect.
Thanks in advance
Signature: Alejandro

Walkingstick

Walkingstick

Hi Alejandro,
Your file name was correct.  This is a Stick Insect or Walkingstick in the order Phasmida.  It appears a Stick Insect appeared on a Dominican Republic stamp in 1999 according to Asahi-net.  We will continue to attempt to identify the species of Stick Insect you submitted.

Daniel, many thanks for your information and your support.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Phasmid
Location: Alto Anchicaya, Colombia
March 30, 2014 12:28 pm
Can you help me with the genus or family of this phasmid. It was very camouflaged when I first found it, but did this threat display when I got close.
Signature: Colin Hutton

Stick Insect

Stick Insect

Dear Colin,
This is a gorgeous photo of a gorgeous Stick Insect or Phasmid.  We are posting your photo and we will attempt identification later this afternoon.  If any of our readers have any ideas, we hope they will write and let us know.

Hi Daniel and Colin:
I believe this Stick Insect belongs to the genus Prisopus (Family Prisopodidae; Subfamily Prisopodinae; Tribe Prisopodini). At least half a dozen species of the genus can be found in Colombia but, unfortunately, neither the photo provided by Colin nor the resources available on the internet provide enough information to enable easy or definitive identification of the species. I found several images of P. horstokkii that appear to be a good match, but I don’t think that’s quite it. It could be P. horridus. According to Conle et al. (2011; The Stick Insects of Colombia) the principal difference between the two species is that  “…P. horridus differs by: the presence of distinct spines on the head…” (page 337), a feature that appears evident to me on Colin’s insect.  I hope this helps. Regards. Karl

Thanks so much for embarking upon this research Karl.  We are currently undergoing some changes in our internet delivery and our email has had a few interruptions.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Walking stick from Peru
Location: Peru
March 9, 2014 8:00 am
Hello I took this photo of this phasmodea “walking stick” in a rainforest of Amazon in Peru, near Iquitos. I d like to know the ID if possible, thanks a lot!
Signature: Jiri Hodecek

Walkingstick

Walkingstick:  male Oreophoetes peruana

Hi Jiri,
This is sure an interesting looking and rather distinctive Walkingstick in the order Phasmida, but our initial attempts at a more specific identification have proven fruitless.  We are posting your image and we will enlist the assistance of our readership on this matter.  We could not locate any matching images on Insetologia, our sister site from Brazil.

Hello, thank u for a fast answer. Yeah I was not able to ID this one and I have much more photos of interesting insects from Peru. However I dont want to flood ur website with my posts :).
Mgr. Jiří Hodeček

Update: 
Thanks to a comment from Alan, we are able to provide a link to Reptilica that has a photo of a sexually dimorphic pair of
Oreophoetes peruana which shows this red coloration in the male.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Two Striped Walking Stick
Location: Daytona Beach, FL
December 23, 2013 9:49 am
Just thought this female was cool. She was hanging out on the side of the house and my grandpa scooped her up for me to see. We put her back after the photo and she went on her merry way.
Signature: Lindsey

Muskmare

Muskmare

Hi Lindsey,
Thanks for sending us your photo.  We want to caution you that the Two Striped Walkingstick, also known as a Muskmare, is capable of expelling a noxious substance with amazing accuracy.  They have a knack for aiming right at a perceived predator’s eyes.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Muskmare
Location: near Tell City, Indiana
September 8, 2013 2:27 pm
Hi,
I took this picture yesterday in The Hoosier National Forest at the campground near Celina Lake in Southern Indiana. From the images on this website I believe it’s a mating pair of Muskmare but it seems that the other pictures of these guys were taken much further south. I’d just like to know for sure what they are.
Thanks.
Signature: Robin

Probably Northern Walkingsticks Mating

Probably Northern Walkingsticks Mating

Dear Robin,
In our opinion, this is a mating pair of Northern Walkingsticks, Diapheromera femorata, and not Muskmares.  See BugGuide for more information on the Northern Walkingstick.

Thanks a bunch Daniel but the northern walking stick doesn’t look anything
like what I saw. Please take a look at the photo I’ve attached below.
Thank you,
Robin

Hi Robin,
We will check with Eric Eaton and get his opinion.

We Stand Corrected:  Eric Eaton identifies Northern Two-Striped Walkingsticks
Daniel:
Wow, must be from southwest Indiana, as this is a mostly southern U.S. walkingstick, the Northern Two-striped Walkingstick, Anisomorpha ferruginea.  More from Bugguide:
http://bugguide.net/node/view/93384
Currently no records there from Indiana, and I wonder if it is even known from there period.  Please suggest the person post the image(s?) there.  Also, it is important to note these insects are well-known for squirting a milky substance from glands in the “neck” as a self-defense maneuver.  They aim for the eyes of their attacker and it is a serious matter if one gets sprayed (potential corneal damage).  Handling them is not recommended.
Eric

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Seeing these a lot!
Location: Davenport , FL
September 8, 2013 7:47 am
Hi there!
Ive been seeing this bug a lot this year. I saw a few that had already died and they were a red color but most of them are brown with a white line on them. This particular one had a baby on its back. I got a picture with the baby on and off its back. While I was trying to take its picture, i must have scared it because it sprayed me with something. I have to admit they kind if scare me. I haven’t seen them all year and they just started popping up during this summer. Thanks!!
Signature: Lauren

Mating Muskmares

Mating Muskmares

Hi Lauren,
After sending you a quick response, we decided to elaborate, create a posting and write back to you.  These are Two Striped Walkingsticks,
Anisomorpha buprestoides, and your guess that the smaller individual is a baby is wrong.  The smaller individual is a male who is attempting to mate with the larger female.  Because the Two Striped Walkingsticks are often found in tandem, they also have an interesting common name, Muskmare.  The Muskmares are able to defend themselves from predators by spraying a caustic chemical with amazing accuracy, often aiming for the predators eye.  You were lucky they missed.  According to BugGuide:  “Members of this genus can deliver a chemical spray to the eyes that can cause corneal damage.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination