Currently viewing the category: "Walkingsticks"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Ocala bug
Location: Ocala Florida
November 20, 2016 6:57 pm
Never seen one anywhere but Ocala National Forest
Signature: Scotty Cooke

Mating Striped Walkingsticks

Mating Striped Walkingsticks

Dear Scotty,
Your image depicts a gorgeous pair of Southern Striped Walkingsticks,
Anisomorpha buprestoides, but their starkly contrasting black and white coloration is unusual and we did find a similarly colored pair on BugGuide.  According to the information page on BugGuide:  “Three color forms, two of them only found in limited areas:  White form, only found around Ocala National Forest;  Orange form, only found around Archbold Biological Station;  Brown form, widely distributed and commonly found throughout the entire range of the species.”  Walkingsticks in the genus Anisomorpha are frequently found mating and are sometimes called Muskmares, and they should be handled with extreme caution or even better not at all, because according to BugGuide:  “Members of this genus can deliver a chemical spray to the eyes that can cause corneal damage.” 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Two insects
Location: Ravenel, SC
October 31, 2016 9:51 am
My husband found these guys in there work shop and was curious what they are.
Signature: Melissa

Two-Striped Walkingsticks Mating

Two-Striped Walkingsticks Mating

Dear Melissa,
These are mating Two-Striped Walkingsticks in the genus
Anisomorpha and they should be handled with caution because according to BugGuide:  “Members of this genus can deliver a chemical spray to the eyes that can cause corneal damage.”  Mating pairs are sometimes called Muskmares, though theoretically, only the female is a Muskmare.  You might enjoy this image of a herd of mating Muskmares from our archives.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Weird stick looking bug/spider?
Location: Daniekskuil, Northern Cape
October 26, 2016 11:49 pm
Found the weird looking spider/bug looking thing early morning on my stoep.
Signature: I dont know? Advise?

Stick Insect

Stick Insect

There is not much critical detail in your image, but this appears to be a Walkingstick or Stick Insect in the order Phasmida.  You can browse iSpot for members of the order.

Good day,
Please see attached close up photos I took this morning, if it should help.
Kind regards,
Stephanie

Stick Bug or True Bug???

Stick Bug or True Bug???

Thanks for sending in more images Stephanie.  We still believe this is a Phasmid, but we would not rule out that it might be a True Bug like a Thread-Legged Bug or Water Scorpion.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: large Walking Stick insect “dropped in”
Location: Snicker’s Gap, Loudon County, Virginia
September 22, 2016 5:32 pm
Hi Daniel – While at a Hawk Watch, I had this Stick insect drop from a tree right in front of me today. I coaxed it onto an oak leaf, to move it out of the gravel parking lot, and got this photo. I estimate that it was about 5 – 6 inches in length. If relevant, the elevation of Snicker’s Gap is around 1,000 feet. I wonder if you can identify the species. Thanks!
Signature: Seth

Snicker’s Gap, Loudon, VA

Northern Walkingstick

Dear Seth,
We believe this is a female Northern Walkingstick,
Diapheromera femorata, and you can compare your individual to this BugGuide image.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bug
Location: mississippi
September 18, 2016 7:58 pm
what type of bug is this?
Signature: mrs.Fliehmann

Striped Walkingstick

Striped Walkingstick

Dear Mrs. Fliehmann,
This is a female Striped Walkingstick in the genus Anisomorpha.  There are two species in North America, and they look quite similar, and both are reported from Mississippi.  According to BugGuide:  “Members of this genus can deliver a chemical spray to the eyes that can cause corneal damage.”  These Walkingsticks are sometimes called Muskmares.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Beautiful walkingstick
Location: San Antonio, Texas
August 6, 2016 6:54 pm
My son and I found this beauty on the siding in our back yard at the end of July. They are digging up the open land directly behind our house to further our housing development, which has resulted in several unwanted and potentially dangerous house guests. This was one I was very excited to see, as I have never found one prior to seeing this one! It was full on sun, around 100 degrees Fahrenheit, and we have not had much recent rain, but had a wet spring. I do not know much about these wonderful insects, and my son and I spent a while watching it off and on before it wandered off. Can you tell me a little about it please?
Signature: Mother of a curious boy

Walkingstick

Walkingstick

Dear Mother of a curious boy,
We are relatively certain your Walkingstick is in the genus Diapheromera, and there are several species reported from Texas according to BugGuide, but alas, we lack the necessary skills to provide you with an exact species identification.  Our best guesses are that this might be either a Creosote Bush Walkingstick, 
Diapheromera covilleae, which BugGuide lists from Texas, Diapheromera persimilis, a species with no common name listed from Texas on BugGuide, or a Prairie Walkingstick, Diapheromera velii , which BugGuide lists from Texas.  What we can state for certain is that this individual is a male who can be identified by his narrow physique and the claspers at the end of his abdomen which are used in mating.  Perhaps one of our readers will be able to provide a comment with a more specific identification. 

Thank you so much!  This gives me something to research!

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination