Currently viewing the category: "Walkingsticks"
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Subject: large Walking Stick insect “dropped in”
Location: Snicker’s Gap, Loudon County, Virginia
September 22, 2016 5:32 pm
Hi Daniel – While at a Hawk Watch, I had this Stick insect drop from a tree right in front of me today. I coaxed it onto an oak leaf, to move it out of the gravel parking lot, and got this photo. I estimate that it was about 5 – 6 inches in length. If relevant, the elevation of Snicker’s Gap is around 1,000 feet. I wonder if you can identify the species. Thanks!
Signature: Seth

Snicker’s Gap, Loudon, VA

Northern Walkingstick

Dear Seth,
We believe this is a female Northern Walkingstick,
Diapheromera femorata, and you can compare your individual to this BugGuide image.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bug
Location: mississippi
September 18, 2016 7:58 pm
what type of bug is this?
Signature: mrs.Fliehmann

Striped Walkingstick

Striped Walkingstick

Dear Mrs. Fliehmann,
This is a female Striped Walkingstick in the genus Anisomorpha.  There are two species in North America, and they look quite similar, and both are reported from Mississippi.  According to BugGuide:  “Members of this genus can deliver a chemical spray to the eyes that can cause corneal damage.”  These Walkingsticks are sometimes called Muskmares.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Beautiful walkingstick
Location: San Antonio, Texas
August 6, 2016 6:54 pm
My son and I found this beauty on the siding in our back yard at the end of July. They are digging up the open land directly behind our house to further our housing development, which has resulted in several unwanted and potentially dangerous house guests. This was one I was very excited to see, as I have never found one prior to seeing this one! It was full on sun, around 100 degrees Fahrenheit, and we have not had much recent rain, but had a wet spring. I do not know much about these wonderful insects, and my son and I spent a while watching it off and on before it wandered off. Can you tell me a little about it please?
Signature: Mother of a curious boy

Walkingstick

Walkingstick

Dear Mother of a curious boy,
We are relatively certain your Walkingstick is in the genus Diapheromera, and there are several species reported from Texas according to BugGuide, but alas, we lack the necessary skills to provide you with an exact species identification.  Our best guesses are that this might be either a Creosote Bush Walkingstick, 
Diapheromera covilleae, which BugGuide lists from Texas, Diapheromera persimilis, a species with no common name listed from Texas on BugGuide, or a Prairie Walkingstick, Diapheromera velii , which BugGuide lists from Texas.  What we can state for certain is that this individual is a male who can be identified by his narrow physique and the claspers at the end of his abdomen which are used in mating.  Perhaps one of our readers will be able to provide a comment with a more specific identification. 

Thank you so much!  This gives me something to research!

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Stick Insect
Location: Cumberland Plateau, southeast Tennessee
June 9, 2016 9:07 am
We frequently see “Stick Bugs” around our house, though more typically in the fall. They usually are 4-6 inches long and are brown. I understand that they must be small when newly hatched, but have never spotted one this small. I though you might be interested.
Thanks for the constant flow of fascinating bug information!
Signature: Bob Kieffer

Immature Walkingstick

Immature Walkingstick

Dear Bob,
Thanks so much for providing our site with your image of an immature Walkingstick, and we commend your foresight in using the ruler for scale.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Stick insect or true bug?
Location: Buenaventura southern Ecuador
March 12, 2016 8:06 am
I’m curious whether this is a stick insect or a hemipteran. It was from a wet disturbed forest ~500 meters ASL in Buenaventura southern Ecuador on February 14th.
Signature: Peter H

Stick Insect

Stick Insect

Dear Peter,
Though some Hemipterans like Water Scorpions and Thread Legged Bugs look similar, your submission is definitely a Stick Insect in the Order Phasmida.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What’s this bug???
Location: Central America
January 6, 2016 6:20 pm
Can you help me identify this bug? Is it dangerous with kids? Do I need to be worried?
Thanks a lot for your help.
Signature: Enrique

Walkingstick

Walkingstick

Dear Enrique,
This is a Stick Insect or Walkingstick in the order Phasmida, and most Walkingsticks are perfectly harmless, though members of the family Pseudophasmatidae, the Striped Walkingsticks, are able to spray a caustic substance with remarkable accuracy into the eyes of an attacker.  We do not believe your individual is in the family Pseudophasmatidae, but exercising caution is recommended.  Central America is a large area and more location specificity might have helped our research.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination