Currently viewing the category: "Walkingsticks"
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Subject: Costa Rica walking stick
Location: Costa Rica
July 14, 2014 10:09 pm
Hello!
Thank you so much for your help with my broad-necked root borer ID request. I have another one for you. I found this insect in Costa Rica 2 years ago on a school trip, it seemed to be some type of walking stick. His colors were amazing! Any idea of what species this is?
Thanks!
Signature: Brittany

Unidentified Walkingstick

Parastatocles Walkingstick

Hi Brittany,
To the best of our knowledge, only male Walkingsticks are capable of flying.  We will try to identify this male Walkingstick tomorrow.  We did locate a matching image on the Costa Rica Bugs and Insect Photos site, but it is not identified.

Update:  July 19, 2014
Thanks to Cesar Crash of the Brazilian site Insetologia, we have this Walkingstick identified as being in the genus
Parastatocles.

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Subject: Children’s Stick Insect
Location: Yarra Ranges near Melbourne, Victoria Australia
June 24, 2014 10:10 pm
Thank you for allowing me to use the image of the Children’s stick insect on Craig’s hand attributing to Craig and your website. On the 16th of February 2014 when we found this none of the twenty people at our Camp (Camp Eureka) had ever seen a children’s stick insect before even though our total ages added together came close to 1000 years. We were extremely intrigued and had it correctly identified at the Melbourne Museum.
Signature: Marie Goonan

Children's Stick Insect

Children’s Stick Insect

You are most welcome Marie,
Did the museum provide the identification based on your image or did you actually supply the Children’s Stick Insect in the flesh?

Hi Daniel,
I have copied in these emails to tell you that the stick insect flew away, while we were not watching, and after we had taken a small twig out of its wing.  So we just supplied a photo to the museum..
Thanks again,
Cheers Marie

Thanks for the additional information Marie.

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Subject: Massive Stick Bug!
Location: Marloth Park, South Africa
May 13, 2014 10:45 am
Hello Bugman,
Kenda here. A friend of mine, Jo, is more than happy to share his photo of a Stick Bug that he took in Marloth Park, South Africa.
Cheers,
Signature: Kenda

Giant Stick Insect

Giant Stick Insect

Hi Kenda,
My, that is a large Giant Stick Insect, and the arm provides a great sense of scale.  We hope to provide a species identification when we have additional time to conduct some research.  We quickly found a reference to
Bactrododema krugeri on the Siyabona Africa website where it states:  “The giant stick insect, Bactrododema krugeri, was only recently named. This amazing insect is almost 30cm long when its legs are stretched out. The female stick insect has a longer body than the male, with a length of 193mm compared to 163mm. However, when legs are taken into account the male is 295mm long compared to the female’s 226mm.It took a British stick insect enthusiast to realise that it was a new species and to name the large insect – Paul Brock, author of several books on stick insects, visited South Africa last year. During his travels he visited the Kruger National Park, the Transvaal Museum and the National Collection in Pretoria. With his expert knowledge, he realised that a specimen collected by Leo Braack in a knobthorn in Skukuza Camp was a new species. It had previously been thought to be another similar species in the insect collections.” 

Giant Stick Insect

Giant Stick Insect

Thank you, Bugman! Very interesting information. I’ll tell my friend, Jo, who will be happy to know he contributed to providing an image of a what appears to be a new species. Stick bugs are already amazing, but this one is incredible!
Cheers!
Kenda

 

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Subject: Phasmid Halopus meyeri
Location: Florida Keys
May 5, 2014 12:09 pm
I’ve found some Phasmids in the keys and it was suggested I put pics of them up on BugGuide.net but couldn’t seem to find a real person to help so I thought I’d share here…
Here is Haplopus meyeri…I don’t think they have been posted here before.
Signature: Tim Borski

Mating Walkingsticks

Mating Mayer’s Walkingsticks

Dear Tim,
BugGuide is a far more egalitarian website than our own as anyone can post images to BugGuide, while here at What’s That Bug?, we are control freaks that individually select which images and letters to post.
  Your submission has us very curious, but it brings up many more questions than we can answer.  First, the name in your subject differs from the name in the body of your message where there is an additional “p”.  Furthermore, we cannot locate any information on the web regarding either spelling except a Facebook posting on the Invertebrate Studies Institute’s Facebook Page, and the entry cites you as the donor who provided a mating pair.  The information provided there, which includes yet a different name spelling with an “a” replacing one “e” in the species name, is:  “RARE phasmid species from the Florida Keys – CUTE baby one! Haplopus mayeri ! We just had 2 hatch from eggs today! Earlier in 2013 we were generously sent 1 adult mating pair by Tim Borski! You can see one of them feeding on the only foodplant that they are reported to eat: a semi-rare plant called “Bay Cedar” (Suriana maritima). We are hoping to find other plants that it can eat and breed them. Eventually we would like to do a population survey to see if this species is actually endangered or threatened. The species lives in areas near the Florida coast in places like Biscayne National Park and the keys – prime real estate!”  Where did you get your Phasmid or Walkingstick identified?  We are guessing that Haplopus mayeri is the proper spelling.
Armed with that information, we returned to internet research and we located your images on FieldHerpForum and one of your comments contains the identification 
Haplopus (Aplopus) mayeri, however, there is no source cited.  Phasmida has images of mounted specimens, including holotype and paratype images.  Taxonomy and other information including the common name Mayer’s Walkingstick can be located at Encyclopedia of Life, ITIS, Animal Diversity Web  and Global Species.  There are very few images of living specimens online, and we feel very lucky that you are allowing us to post your images. 

Female Mayer's Walkingstick

Female Mayer’s Walkingstick

I apologize for the inconsistencies but I was frustrated with BugGuide and typing fast…just trying to salvage my efforts in futility there. Here’s a pic of a mating pair.
Btw, it was my pic on FHF.
Sorry for the confusion,
Tim

Thanks Tim,
You already sent us this image.  Where did you get the proper identification?

Dr Aaron T.  Dossey at Invertebrate  Studies Institute. I have many pics of them, including the eggs. I sent them to Aaron and he hatched some. I was told they fed on Bay cedar but Aaron told me they were eating Black berry leaves(?)  Tthe last one I found (a week or so ago) was on a Sea grape tree. I was hunting snakes after dark and one of my boys encountered it. I brought it home and it fed off those leaves until I sent her to Aaron. She was a sub adult.  Btw, thank you for following up and being helpful.

 

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Subject: Only curiosity…
Location: Jarabacoa, Dominican Republic
April 15, 2014 7:24 am
Many warm greetings from the Dominican Republic. I saw this beautiful insect resting over the ceiling at the country house of a friend. All the time we spent on the terrace, this curious insect remained in that position. If it’s possible, can Whatsthatbug can give me any information on this peculiar insect.
Thanks in advance
Signature: Alejandro

Walkingstick

Walkingstick

Hi Alejandro,
Your file name was correct.  This is a Stick Insect or Walkingstick in the order Phasmida.  It appears a Stick Insect appeared on a Dominican Republic stamp in 1999 according to Asahi-net.  We will continue to attempt to identify the species of Stick Insect you submitted.

Daniel, many thanks for your information and your support.

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Subject: Phasmid
Location: Alto Anchicaya, Colombia
March 30, 2014 12:28 pm
Can you help me with the genus or family of this phasmid. It was very camouflaged when I first found it, but did this threat display when I got close.
Signature: Colin Hutton

Stick Insect

Stick Insect

Dear Colin,
This is a gorgeous photo of a gorgeous Stick Insect or Phasmid.  We are posting your photo and we will attempt identification later this afternoon.  If any of our readers have any ideas, we hope they will write and let us know.

Hi Daniel and Colin:
I believe this Stick Insect belongs to the genus Prisopus (Family Prisopodidae; Subfamily Prisopodinae; Tribe Prisopodini). At least half a dozen species of the genus can be found in Colombia but, unfortunately, neither the photo provided by Colin nor the resources available on the internet provide enough information to enable easy or definitive identification of the species. I found several images of P. horstokkii that appear to be a good match, but I don’t think that’s quite it. It could be P. horridus. According to Conle et al. (2011; The Stick Insects of Colombia) the principal difference between the two species is that  “…P. horridus differs by: the presence of distinct spines on the head…” (page 337), a feature that appears evident to me on Colin’s insect.  I hope this helps. Regards. Karl

Thanks so much for embarking upon this research Karl.  We are currently undergoing some changes in our internet delivery and our email has had a few interruptions.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination