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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: annual cicada
Location: southern ontario, canada
September 1, 2014 12:23 pm
I have used your site a number of times to identify different bugs I’ve found. As I came across it again while looking for details about an annual cicada I recently got some photos of, I thought I might see if you would like some of those photos.
They are yours to use on your site if you’d like.
Thanks for the info,
Jeff Epp

Cicada

Cicada

Hi Jeff,
Your images are beautiful.  This does not look like one of the Cicadas in the genus
Tibicen, which are quite common, so we will try to provide a genus at a later point.  You should handle Cicadas with caution.  We tried to locate a comment we received from a reader once who was handling a Cicada when the Cicada plunged its piercing proboscis into the person’s finger.  It was allegedly quite painful.  We just located the comment which states:  “A few years ago, while working in a state park nature center in Indiana, a young (6 years old) entomologist brought his latest aquisition, a cicada, to show me. I picked it up and let it crawl on my thumb. When I was ready to give it back, the thing wouldn’t let go, and decided to press that sucking mouth part into my thumb. It was pretty painful. They can DEFINATELY bite (or perhaps STAB is a more appropriate term).”

Cicada

Cicada

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Caterpillar
Location: Oneida, WI
August 18, 2014 6:52 pm
I found this caterpillar on my back porch after a rain storm on 8-18-14 in Oneida , WI. From what I can see from photos online I think it might be a waved sphinx but wanted your opinion.
Thank You,
Linda Stevens
Signature: Linda

Waved Sphinx Caterpillar

Waved Sphinx Caterpillar

Hi Linda,
Based on the images posted to the Sphingidae of the Americas website, we agree that this is a Waved Sphinx Caterpillar,
Ceratomia undulosa.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What insect is this?
Location: East Coast- Balt, Md
August 13, 2014 12:45 am
Found this suck roaming my kitchen floor at 3am?
What is it?
Signature: Dez

Spider Wasp:  Tachypompilus ferrugineus

Spider Wasp: Tachypompilus ferrugineus

Dear Dez,
This Spider Wasp,
Tachypompilus ferrugineus, appears to be dead since you have also included a ventral view with its legs sticking up in the air.  Since you found it roaming, we are guessing it died at your hands.  We believe living Spider Wasps, like this one pictured on BugGuide, are much prettier than dead ones. Spider Wasps are not aggressive toward humans, and in an effort to educate you and others on the importance all living creatures play in the complicated web of life on our planet, we are tagging this posting as Unnecessary Carnage.

Dead Spider Wasp

Dead Spider Wasp

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Unidentified spider
Location: Delphi, Central Greece, Southern Europe
August 13, 2014 7:57 am
This spider was seen in Delphi, Greece, on 10th May 2014. I haven’t seen one before… It is about 3 – 4 cm long, black and hairy with an orange ring on its back which covers its belly. I moved it with my leg and it felt endangered, so it lift its forelegs to attack. Pretty scary and amazing! I would be delighted if you could send me feedback with the species of this spider as to search for further information. Thank you in advance!
Signature: Demetrios Grigoropoulos

Ladybird Spider:  Eresus ruficapillus

Ladybird Spider: Eresus ruficapillus

Dear Demetrios,
This is a Ladybird Spider in the family Eresidae,
and it is a male spider.  The males and females exhibit pronounced sexual dimorphism, and they don’t even resemble the same species.  Most examples of male Ladybird Spiders we have seen have bright red abdomens with black spots, and their coloration and markings resemble those of a Ladybird Beetle, hence the common name.  We located an image of the Eresidae, Lady bird spider page that looks very much like your individual, and you must scroll down to Eresus ruficapillus to view the images.  Another individual is pictured on the Arachnofilia forum.  Ladybird Spiders are not commonly encountered and there is much evidence that they are endangered. 

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Wasp or locust
Location: Southern Ontario Canada
August 12, 2014 4:21 am
Intendant at my golf course captured in these two very dangerous looking bugs what are they
Signature: Curious golfer

Pigeon Horntails

Pigeon Horntails

Dear Curious Golfer,
These are Pigeon Horntails, a species of Wood Wasp.  The female Pigeon Horntail lays eggs in dead or dying deciduous trees, and the larvae bore in the wood, feeding as they bore.  According to BugGuide:  “hosts include beech, elm, hickory, maple, oak, poplar, apple, pear, sycamore, and hackberry.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Butterflies
Location: Westford, MA
July 29, 2014 3:42 pm
Hello,
A friend of mine was at a butterfly zoo in Westford, MA and she came across several exotic species that she wanted identified
Signature: Collin

Birdwing Butterfly

Golden Birdwing Butterfly

Dear Collin,
Butterfly habitats are not natural settings for butterflies, and it can be difficult to identify unknown species without knowing the country of origin, which is one method we use to search for identifications.  Additionally, the quality of your friend’s images is very poor, which is also detrimental for identification purposes.  We do know that one image is of a Birdwing Butterfly in the tribe Troidini.  It appears to be in the genus
Troides.  You can compare your image to this image of a female Troides rhadamantus from the Goliathus website.  As you can see from this FlickR image, the Golden Birdwing, which is the common name for Troides rhadamantus, is a resident in the Chicago Botanic Garden Butterfly House, which is a good indication it can be found in other butterfly habitats that often use the same breeders to obtain stock.  Let your friend know that butterfly habitats often have displays with images that assist in identifying the residents.  The Westford Butterfly Place has a website with a gallery.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination