Currently viewing the category: "Uncategorized"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Crane Fly?
Location: Indiana, USA
June 4, 2016 11:24 am
This appears to be a some form of Crane Fly on side of house, June 2016, but cannot ID.
Signature: Kurt

Possibly Tiger Crane Fly

Possibly Tiger Crane Fly

Dear Kurt,
This is one of the Large Crane Flies in the family Tipulidae, and we believe it resembles this Tiger Crane Fly,
Nephrotoma eucera , that is pictured on BugGuide.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: ID request for bizarre looking moth
Location: Atlanta, GA
May 27, 2016 6:55 am
Hello,
While leaving work yesterday I noticed a very unusual moth on the wall. If it were on a tree it could be easily mistaken as a mushroom. Upon further inspection it had some very beautiful coloration. I’ve never seen a moth like this before and would like to request your assistance in identifying.
Thanks!
Signature: Chris

Wood Nymph Moth

Wood Nymph Moth

Dear Chris,
This is a Wood Nymph Moth in the genus Eudryas  which can be found on BugGuide.  Many of our readers call this a “Bird Poop” Moth because it seems to resemble bird droppings which may afford it some degree of camouflage protection.

Thank you so much!!!!! I’m sharing the info with my coworkers now :)

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Magnificent looking exotic lava
Location: Plaza Bavaro, Punta Cana, Dominican republic
March 23, 2016 10:09 am
Hey! We went past this beautiful creature on our way to our hotel, and since its so beautiful we wanted to know what it evolves to some day. I hope you have the time, thank you!
Signature: Victor

Spotted Oleander Caterpillar

Spotted Oleander Caterpillar

Dear Victor,
This little beauty is a Spotted Oleander Caterpillar,
Empyreuma pugione, a species recently introduced to south Florida that we identified on BugGuide.  According to BugGuide:  “The spotted oleander caterpillar is a recent immigrant to the US from the Caribbean, first recorded in Florida in Boca Raton, Palm Beach County, in February 1978.”  The adult Spotted Oleander Caterpillar Moth is an effective wasp mimic.

Thanks a lot! What a wonderful service you guys/girls have!

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Unknown bug
Location: Lubbock, tx
February 12, 2016 9:14 pm
Hello a few years ago I found this but crawling on my tree in my front yard. I was very creeped out so I ran in the house to get something to kill it and it was gone:( I don’t have a picture but I have a drawing of what It looks like. The bug was about 3-4 inches long
Signature: Carl J Young

Bug Drawing

Bug Drawing

Dear Carl,
As entomological identification drawings go, your example is lacking in critical details that would help us to identify what you observed, but we can deduce that it was very colorful, and by your description it is quite large.  Even though your drawing does not help us determine a classification, not many insects are large and colorful, but our first thoughts are that you saw either a moth, beetle, cicada or possibly a grasshopper.  Our first impression is that you might have seen a Regal Moth or Royal Walnut Moth, a species that is reported from Texas.  The Regal Moth is quite large, very colorful, and its markings are remarkably similar to your drawing.  Some other possibilities include the Eastern Hercules Beetle, which is the heaviest North American beetle, and it is found in Texas.  Annual Cicadas are quite large and they are found in Texas, and the Painted Grasshopper or Barber Pole Grasshopper is extremely colorful and found in Texas.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bug
Location: Tennessee
January 27, 2016 8:04 am
Found in tennessee…having trouble trying to identify
Signature: Lee

Carolina Leaf Roller

Carolina Leaf Roller

Dear Lee,
We believe we have properly identified this Longhorned Orthopteran as a Carolina Leaf Roller,
Camptonotus carolinensis, and the spiky ovipositor is an indication that this is a female.  You can verify our identification by comparing your individual to this image on BugGuide.  According to BugGuide, the common name is because the Carolina Leaf Roller “Bites through leaf in order to form flap. Flap is folded over, edge is pulled down with legs, and then edges are glued together with silk from gland on mouth. Sometimes uses the pods of Bladdernut, Staphylea trifolia, as a shelter instead of a leaf.”  This is a very unusual time of year for this sighting, because according to BugGuide they occur in:  “Late summer to fall. Nymphs in July-August, adults September-October in North Carolina”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bug ID
Location: NC
January 26, 2016 8:46 pm
I have only found one of these. He has to be the strangest insect I’ve ever seen. I didn’t kill it ! I found him this way . It was on our living room floor near the propane fireplace.
Signature: Lost in the woods

What's That Bug???

What’s That Bug???

Dear Lost in the woods,
Though you have provided several images, we have no idea what they depict.  You mentioned finding it near the propane fireplace.  Do you burn wood in the fireplace?  Was there a stack of firewood nearby?  Many insects infest wood, including the larvae of beetles in the families Cerambycidae and Buprestidae, but this doesn’t look like either a Round Headed Borer which is pictured on BugGuide or a Flat Headed Borer which is also pictured on BugGuide.

What's That Bug???

What’s That Bug???

No sir , WE do not use wood . Actually have only turn it on one or two time. Funny looking little guy ! It look like it has a possum tail.
Lost in the woods

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination