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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: They are everywhere
Location: Northeast. State of CT
May 26, 2015 5:00 pm
It is almost summer time in CT. Temps are climbing to mid 80’s. We can’t even go outside now. They are on us when we go in the grass. They are on the deck. It’s crazy. We have never had these before. Been living here for 4 years.
They don’t bite. Im just so concerned for the children and tracking inside the house.
Signature: Concerned CT resident

Globular Springtails

Globular Springtails

Dear Concerned CT resident,
You have no cause for concern.  These look like Globular Springtails in the order Symphpleona, and you may compare your image to those on BugGuide. Springtails are perfectly harmless, though they can be an annoyance when they are plentiful. 

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Gatlinburg bug like scorpion
Location: gatlinburg, tn
April 1, 2015 4:29 pm
What could this be? 8 legs. 2 claws. 1 tail with what could be stinger. No bigger in size in total than a quarter.
Signature: josh

Scorpion, in Tennessee???

Scorpion, in Tennessee???

Are you Joshing us Josh???  It is April Fool’s Day.
This looks somewhat like a Bark Scorpion in the genus
Centruroides, and one member of the genus, Centruroides vittatus, is known from Tennessee, according to BugGuide, but other than the general shape, your Scorpion does not match the BugGuide description:  “A very important clue is the ‘triangle’ on the front of the carapace; long, slender appendages, which are noticeably more elongate in males than in females; two broad stripes down back, with orange bars on each tergite (dorsal plate); hands and fifth metasoma (tail) segment are darker, especially in young and freshly molted specimens; broad stripe on the back of the tail. – Kari J McWest.”  Your individual more closely resembles the Florida Bark Scorpion pictured on BugGuide, Centruroides gracilis, but that species has only been reported from Florida and California, though according to BugGuide it is:  “Introduced from the tropics.”  We believe a much more likely candidate for your Scorpion in the Southern Unstriped Scorpion, Vaejovis carolinianus, because it so closely resembles this BugGuide image.  It is reported from Tennessee, according to BugGuide, and the best evidence is the information posted to BugGuide that “The only scorpion native to much of the Appalachian states” and “Occasionally enters homes and is often found under rocks and other surface objects. This species is not of medical importance.”

Jacob Helton, Alisha Bragg, Andrea Leonard Drummond, Alfonso Moreno, Christy Harris, Sue Dougherty liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Giant ant in California?
Location: Ventura, CA
March 11, 2015 8:30 pm
I was on a walk at twilight in a neighborhood near orchards and saw this bug on the pavement. I’ve looked at all the California bugs online and cannot ID this one. It was black, armored/glossy, and was about 4 inches long, with the head as large as a good-sized grape. The photos are a little blurry, but those are definitely mandibles, not antennae. This creature looked like something I would see in Central America.
Signature: Rachel

Hoax or new species???

Hoax or new species???

Hi Rachel,
In our opinion, your giant insect looks like something one would find in a novelty store.

I am so embarrassed! I returned to the scene of the sighting and sure enough it was a large plastic bug. Thank you for your time!!
– Rachel

Richard King, Sue Dougherty, Nichole Bradford, Kyla Gunter Gatlin, Alisha Bragg, Relax. I'm an Entomologist, Julia Johnson, Andrea Leonard Drummond liked this post
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Subject: Molting aquatic life form
Location: Lucas County, Ohio
March 6, 2015 12:37 pm
One of my volunteers found this insect (I think), molting in her collecting tub of vernal pool water in mid-July in NW Ohio. The pool is isolated, nowhere near a creek, pond, or lake. The attached pictures are 20x if I remember correctly (other option is 40x) and were taken in the field. We watched it struggle free of the larval skin under the microscope. The skin shape reminds me of a damselfly nymph. Could this possibly be the pupal form? I’ve tried to count legs of both larvae and the skin, magnify head shape etc, but I am still stumped.
Signature: Eileen

Aquatic Bug

Aquatic Bug

Dear Eileen,
We cannot say for certain what creature this is, but we have some thoughts.  If the tub collected rain water, any insects present would need to have either developed from an egg laid by a flying insect or been transported from another water source on the bodies of a bird or other creature that visited the pool.  This creature reminds us somewhat of an aerial view of a mosquito tumbler, the pupal form.  Most images online are side views, but BugGuide does contain an aerial view that looks similar.  We hope someone more skilled at aquatic identifications can provide some input.

Aquatic Bug

Aquatic Bug

Hi Daniel,
Thanks for the reply. This was found in a collecting bucket, about a
quart of water taken from a huge vernal pool that has a wild egg bank
in the bottom of the pool when it is dry. I agree, it does resemble a
top view of a mosquito tumbler. It was definitely squirming out of the
nearby exoskeleton though, and the legs on that shell have spurs on
them – not found on mosquito larvae. It’s always possible that larvae
can get caught up in other exoskeletons as they’re wriggling about,
but in the one picture there are definite legs on the new critter.
Thanks very much for trying. I use this as an example for my
volunteers – there is always something new to be found in a vernal
pool and it can’t always be identified!
Eileen

Aquatic Bug

Aquatic Bug

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Subject: Australian Beetle
Location: East Fremantle, Australia
December 3, 2014 3:54 pm
Here’s one that’s quite distinctive — in my eyes it looks like an Aboriginal painting — but I can’t find anything like it on the web.
It’s about 12mm (1/2″) long, without the antennae. The picture was taken on Dec. 3, 2014 (beginning of summer), on an indigenous tree in an urban park rather late in the day (4:20pm).
Signature: Norm Jackson

Beautiful Cockroach Nymph

Beautiful Cockroach Nymph

Dear Norm,
This is not a beetle.  It is a Beautiful Cockroach nymph,
Ellipsidion australe, which we identified on the Insects of Brisbane website, or it is a related species of Cockroach in the genus EllipsidionThis is not a species that infests homes. 

Mary Lemmink Lawrence, Sue Dougherty, Jacob Helton, Amy Gosch, Andrea Leonard Drummond, Jessica M. Schemm liked this post
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Subject: beautiful moth
Location: Lanzarote
November 26, 2014 6:00 am
Hi found this on the bed and wondered what tyep of moth it was
Signature: miss

Hawkmoth

Barbury Spurge Hawkmoth

Dear miss,
Before we could even begin to attempt to identify your Hawkmoth in the family Sphingidae, we needed to first research the location of Lanzarote, which we have learned is in the Canary Islands.
  Once that was established, we quickly identified your Hawkmoth as Hyles tithymali on EnAcademic and then we verified the identification on Sphingidae of the Western Palaearctic where we learned it has a common name: Barbary Spurge Hawkmoth.  The Sphingidae of the Western Palaearctic site states:  “Restricted to the Canary and ?Cape Verde Islands, where it is widespread, occurring from sea-level to 1000m in short-lived but well-defined colonies (Schurian & Grandisch, 1991). Commonest in the drier and warmer parts, such as dry sand dunes, steep-sided valleys (van der Heyden, 1988), and cultivated areas where its main hostplant is most abundant.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination