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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Broad neck root borer?
Location: Binghamton NY
July 16, 2014 7:50 pm
Heres the pics, crazy looking beetle in NY. Didnt expect this find
Signature: Mr NY

Female Broad-Necked Root Borer

Female Broad-Necked Root Borer

Dear Mr. NY,
Your multiple angle views of a female Broad-Necked Root Borer are an excellent addition to our archives.  The belly shot shows the lighter coloration and the head-on view reveals the powerful mandibles that should be avoided when handling large and powerful Prionid Beetles.

Broad-Necked Root Borer

Broad-Necked Root Borer

Broad-Necked Root Borer

Broad-Necked Root Borer

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: moth
Location: Mesa Verde National Park, Colorado
July 10, 2014 6:11 pm
I am curious about this moth I saw recently inside Mesa Verde, especially the antenna. Thanks, Betsy
Signature: Betsy

Male Western Polyphemus Moth

Male Polyphemus Moth

Dear Betsy,
This is a male Giant Silkworm Moth in the genus
Antheraea, and based on the location, we would deduce it is the Polyphemus Moth, Antheraea polyphemus. The extremely feathery antennae of male Giant Silkworm Moths in the family Saturniidae enable them to locate a mate.  Adult moths in this family are often very large and they do not feed as adults as they have inherited atrophied mouthparts that are not functional.  They store energy as caterpillars and most individuals live less than a week as adults, during which time males must locate mates.  The antennae enable the male to sense a female who may be many miles away because of the pheromones she releases.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Mysterious bright green glow–bugs?
Location: Carlsbad, CA
July 9, 2014 9:09 am
Last nite our friend took us to their rental home here in Carlsbad, CA to show us some mysterious glowing objects. I could not believe my eyes. In several nearby trees there were many dozens of bright, emerald green glowing objects that seemed to be about the size of a marble. We guessed there were 100 – 200 spread out over half a dozen trees in four different home’s backyards. None were low enough to the ground to observe, all were 15 to 30 feet high in the trees. The objects did not move, the glow was continuous, not flashing like a firefly. I’ve loved insects all my life, so I am more familiar with them than most people, but this has me completely stumped. Could it be a prank? Don’t know. If it is, there is no way to figure out how anyone could do it. If you have any ideas about what this phenomenon could be, let me know. Worst case I’ll drive back to the neighborhood and start asking the neighbors about it.
Signature: Doug H

Poorly focused image of greenery

Poorly focused image of greenery

Dear Doug,
The image you submitted is a poorly focused image of greenery in the sun, not a night shot of glowing insects.

Daniel,  I know, I don’t have an image of the “light mystery” because they were not accessible.  I was hoping that a description alone might be sufficient.
Doug

Thanks for the clarification Doug.  We often receive “crank” identification requests with doctored images, and though there was a note of seriousness in your request, the image you included was obviously not the phenomenon you were inquiring about.  The only glowing insect that comes to mind that is found in California is the California Glowworm, but to the best of our knowledge, they are not found in trees.  Perhaps one of our readers will provide some insight into the bioluminescent phenomenon you witnessed.

I may go back over to that neighborhood and see if I can get close to one of the glowing objects.  I’ll let you know when I do.  I won’t give up on this.
None of the glowing objects were lower on the trees than about 15 feet above the ground, and there were a couple of hundred.
Doug

We are very curious about this Doug, and we hope to get a followup report with images.

Well my friends, the sad truth is that I went over the neighborhood w/ the glowing lights in the trees, and I asked a homeowner if he know the source. He sure did…he bought some special projection lights from Disney that cast green glowing dots all over the place!!!!  Go figure.  I swear, I looked really carefully to see if these things could be faked, but nothing was obvious, esp at a distance.  Sorry for the false alarm.
Doug

Thanks for solving the mystery Doug.  We are sorry to learn you were the victim of a hoax.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Thank You
July 7, 2014 2:31 pm
Just wanted to drop a quick line telling you guys how AWESOME you are! Just discovered your sight recently, and it is now one of my top go-tos.  I work at a retail nursery, and spend a lot of time helping customers with ‘pest’ identification.  We all feel this is our opportunity to help educate the public about the wonders of the insect world, and change their philosophy from “it’s a bug– kill it!” to “wow! what’s that?” I like to recommend your site, and appreciate your live-and-let-live attitude. Keep up the good work!
Signature: Mary Elliott

Dear Mary,
It is nice to hear that folks working in a nursery share our philosophy regarding the importance of insect life on our planet.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: marine blue
Location: Los Angeles (Highland Park)
June 17, 2014 12:42 pm
Dear Bugman,
Here is a tiny butterfly from my garden. I saw a flash of bluish-purple as she was flying, then she landed on my lantana bush. I was able to get fairly close, so I thought you might like this picture. I think she is a marine blue.
Thank you!
Signature: Moira

Marine Blue

Marine Blue

Dear Moira,
We agree with your identification of this Marine Blue,
 Leptotes marina.  Since plumbago, a food plant for the caterpillar, is commonly planted in southern California, the Marine Blue is quite common even in the city.  See BugGuide for more information on the Marine Blue.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Red bodied bug on ground next to maple tree
Location: Oveland Park, KS
June 4, 2014 10:04 pm
Dear What’s that bug,
There are hundreds of these bugs on the ground next to our Red Maple tree. The body is about 1/4 inch long. I would love to know what they are (and if they are helpful or harmful or neither).
Thank you and all the best,
Neal Schuster
Overland Park, KS
Signature: Neal Schuster

Boxelder Bug Nymph

Boxelder Bug Nymph

Hi Neal,
This is an immature Eastern Boxelder Bug, and they are often found in large aggregations.

Hi Daniel,
Thank you so much for your quick response.  I am a bug-fan and I always enjoy figuring out what they are.
Thank you for maintaining your site.  It’s fabulous.
All the best,
Neal Schuster

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination