Currently viewing the category: "Raspy Crickets"
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Subject: IS THIS GRASSHOPPER /WASP?
Location: RIVERLAND. SOUTH AUSTRALIA.
January 16, 2013 9:32 am
CAN YOU PLEASE IDENTIFY THIS BUG FOR ME AND IS THERE LIKELY TO BE MORE OF THEM HERE. THANKYOU.
Signature: GRANNY

Raspy Cricket

Dear GRANNY,
You really don’t need to worry much about this Raspy Cricket in the family Gryllacrididae and likely in the genus
Ametrus.  We identified it from our own archives thanks to the input of a noted Katydid expert, Piotr Naskrecki.  What appears to be a stinger is actually the females ovipositor, an organ used in the laying of eggs.

THANKYOU DANIEL FOR YOUR FAST REPLY…I AM VISION IMPAIRED AND ACTUALLY THOUGHT IT WAS A HUGE SPIDER THAT LANDED ON MY SHOULDER..I SCREAMED SO FRIENDS CAME RUNNING AND FOUND THE INSECT..IT WAS THEY WHO NEEDED IT IDENTIFIED AND TY SOO MUCH…GOOD LUCK WITH YOUR GREAT WORK..GRANNY..

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Cricket from India
Location: Agumbe, Karnataka, India
April 10, 2012 7:26 pm
This photo of an unidentified cricket was taken in January by a trip mate on a recent adventure in India. The antennas must have been near a foot long! She was on a fence post with her ovipositor out, so we tried not to disturb her too much. Any ID would be greatly appreciated!
Signature: Brian

Raspy Cricket

Dear Brian,
We are not certain if this Longhorned Orthopteran is a Katydid or a Raspy Cricket, which is what we are leaning towards.  We will contact Katydid expert Piotr Naskrecki to get his input.

Hi Daniel,
You are correct, this is a raspy cricket. The easiest way to tell them apart is to look at the front tibia: a katydid will have tympanum (or a least a tympanal slit) below the knee, raspy crickets don’t have them. Unfortunately, I will not be able to tell you more about this Indian species other than that it is possibly (with a big question mark) a member of the genus Pardogryllacris.
Piotr

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Tsingy Bemaraha Katydid
Location: Western Madagascar
April 10, 2012 6:45 am
Hi there
I recently found this on the Bemaraha plateau at the village of Bevero in Madagascar. Have you any idea if it has been seen before? A designation down to species would be appreciated if possible. What possible advantage could there be in this shocking green and pink combination? Your thoughts please, Thank you. Len
Signature: Len deBeer

Raspy Cricket from Madagascar

Hi Len,
We will contact Katydid expert Piotr Naskrecki to see if he can identify this species which is possibly an immature specimen since it is lacking wings.  We don’t have a theory on the advantage of the coloration of this Katydid.

Piotr Naskrecki Responds
Hi Daniel,
This is not a katydid but a nymph of a gryllacridid, also known as a leaf-rolling or raspy cricket. But it would be difficult to ID the genus at this stage as this is a very young nymph.
Cheers,
Piotr

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Insect from Kilcowera Station
Location: Kilcowera Station, Outback Queensland, Australia
December 2, 2011 6:45 pm
Hi bugman! Love your website, so handy!It’s early summer here in Oz and these insects are all over the place in their little homes growing big, ready to fly.
They live in bricks,small diameter steel pipes and in suitable bits of steel and other things that have a nice cosy hole that they can cover at one end.
Do they bite? They look quite terrifying and I hate the look of them. They start off only a couple of centimetres long and can get to about 8 cm.
Signature: Toni Sherwin

Striped Raspy Cricket

Hi Toni,
We identified your insect as a Striped Raspy Cricket,
Paragryllacris combusta, on the Brisbane Insect website which states:  “Striped Raspy Crickets are also known as Tree Crickets. Adults are dark brown to pale brown in colour with fully developed wings. They have very long antenna, all legs are spiny.  They hide in nest on tree during the day. Their nest is usually two board leaves hold together by silky material. They are well known for their ability to find the way home after foraging distance away.”  You indicate that they live in bricks and pipes, and provided a photo of the covering they create at one end.  We did additional research and learned on Bush Craft Oz that they are:  “Large cricket (body up to 45 mm), nocturnal feeder, spends day in tree holes, or, more usually, two leaves stuck together with silk like material. Can navigate home each night. Has been observed nectar feeding. Fully developed wings. Patterns on face.”  Since they spend the diurnal hours in tree holes, they are probably using your bricks as a substitute lair.  We are intrigued with their ability to spin silk.  The sword-like ovipositor on your individual indicates she is a female.

Silken Lair of the Striped Raspy Cricket

Well thank you very much for your speedy response.  I have never seen their nest in trees! I have observed however that it seems it’s the smaller ones hide behind the white silk like stuff and don’t come out for a fee weeks, then one day the white stuff will have been broken or eaten away and the insect is gone.  And they get much bigger than 45ml!!!  Do they bite?????  Regards Toni

Many large Orthopterans can bite, but we have no knowledge of the Striped Raspy Cricket being a biter, though we would surmise that they would only bite if carelessly handled.

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Katydid, grasshopper, or cockroach? Please let it be one of the first two…
Location: Cleveland, ohio suburb
August 20, 2011 5:05 pm
Hello, My husband found this insect in our northeast Ohio dining room. Our house is bordered by a large wooded area so I am thinking that it may be a katydid. However, I always worry when I see a large bug like this (can’t help myself)
Signature: worried in Ohio

Carolina Leaf Roller

Dear worried in Ohio,
Though your photo is blurry, we believe that, based on this photo posted to BugGuide, this is a female Carolina Leaf Roller,
Camptonotus carolinensis, which is classified as a Raspy Cricket in the family Gryllacrididae.  It isn’t classified in either the cricket family or the katydid family, though all three families are grouped together as Long-Horned Orthopterans in the suborder Ensifera.  According to BugGuide, it is a beneficial insect that:  “Hunts aphids at night.”

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Unusual Orthoptera?
Location: Lawrence County Ohio (far southern ohio)
August 29, 2010 10:08 am Dear Bugman,
I wonder if you can identify this odd insect that I found on my front porch light. I live in rural Southern Ohio and have never seen any insect like this. Hopefully you can tell by the photo, it appears to be wingless, has extremely long curling antennae, and a large stinger or ovipositor. I believe it is order Orthoptera, and looks similar to the shield back katydid, but not exactly. Any ideas? Thank you!
Hilary duDomaine

Photo is too small to make out any details

Unusual Orthoptera New Photo Attached
Thanks for writing back! Attached is a much better picture taken with a digital camera. Hope this helps!
Hilary

Carolina Leaf Roller

Hi again Hilary,
Thanks for sending a much better image.  Even though some parts of the body are obscured, we cannot imagine that this could be anything other than a Raspy Cricket in the family Grillacridadae known as the Carolina Leaf-Roller,
Camptonotus carolinensis.  You can compare it to this photo on BugGuide. The information page on bugGuide indicates it:  “Hunts aphids at night” and “Bites through leaf in order to form flap. Flap is folded over, edge is pulled down with legs, and then edges are glued together with silk from gland on mouth. Sometimes uses empty Bladdernut (Staphylea) pods in which to hide instead of leaves.“  BugGuide also notes:  “Runs rapidly. Antennae very long, at least five times as long as body. (These do not stick out of leaf shelter.) Ovipositor is upturned and carried over back.

Wow thank you! That is definitely it! I have never seen one of these around my home, so it was great to get info on this unusual cricket! Thanks for your help,
-Hilary

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination