Currently viewing the category: "Raspy Crickets"
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Subject: What’s in my sister’s roses?
Location: Sydney, Australia
May 21, 2016 7:55 am
My sister lives in northern Sydney, Australia, and is a photographer. She doesn’t know what beastie it is hiding in her roses but she’d like to! I have been unfortunately useless. Lots of people are suggesting earwig, but it doesn’t look like an earwig to me at all. Any help greatly appreciated!
Signature: Natalie Lyndon

Raspy Cricket

Raspy Cricket

Dear Natalie,
Though they often take refuge in rose blossoms, this is definitely NOT an Earwig.  We believe this is a Raspy Cricket in the family Gryllacrididae.  This image from Dave’s Garden looks very similar, and you can find additional information on the Brisbane Insect site where it states:  “They usually spend the daytime in burrows or in leaves shelters. Both adults and nymphs produce silks by their mouthparts. They lay silk to line burrows wall or hold leaves together. Some build burrows or leaves retreats similar to those made by spiders.”

Fantastic! Thanks, Daniel. My sister will be pleased to know!

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: hi
Location: Marshall nc
January 4, 2016 6:52 pm
What is this
Signature: aaron Chisholm

Corpse of a Carolina Leaf Roller

Corpse of a Carolina Leaf Roller

Dear Aaron,
This is a female Orthopteran, and we believe it may be a Carolina Leaf Roller, but its condition has us quite curious.  It appears to be dead and not the exuvia or shed exoskeleton that results during metamorphosis.  Perhaps this individual succumbed to a fungus attack similar to this BugGuide image.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What’s this
Location: Memphis tn
November 27, 2015 9:21 am
Can you identify this insect
Signature: jeff taylor

 Carolina Leaf Roller


Carolina Leaf Roller

Dear Jeff,
This Raspy Cricket in the family Gryllacrididae is a Carolina Leaf Roller,
Camptonotus carolinensis, which you can verify by comparing your individual to this image posted to BugGuide.  Furthermore, your individual is a female as evidenced by the long ovipositor at the end of her abdomen.  The commom name is because, according to BugGuide:  “Bites through leaf in order to form flap. Flap is folded over, edge is pulled down with legs, and then edges are glued together with silk from gland on mouth. Sometimes uses the pods of Bladdernut, Staphylea trifolia, as a shelter instead of a leaf.”

Thank you Daniel for the response !!!!   Very nice service you have there !!  Appreciate !!

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: what is this?!
Location: South Australia
March 12, 2015 10:55 pm
I found this massive bug in my horses water trough today, do you have any idea what it is? I’ve never seen it before and it’s kind of scary!
Signature: Thanks!

Probably Raspy Cricket

Probably Raspy Cricket

We believe this is a Raspy Cricket in the family Gryllacrididae and they are reported to deliver a painful bite, though what you might have mistaken for a stinger is actually an ovipositor used to lay eggs.  More images can be found on the Brisbane Insect website.

Probably Raspy Cricket

Probably Raspy Cricket

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this?
Location: Gaitlinburg TN USA
May 10, 2014 3:21 pm
Hi , my name is Justin I collect insects as a hobby and have taken a couple entomology classes, but I can’t ID this insect. It looks like some sort of a longhorn beetle . But I believe this is husk or shell. Is this possibly a nymph stage of an insect? This was found in November 2013 near Gaitlinburg TN USA.
Signature: Justin. T

Unknown Katydid Nymph

Fungus Infected female Carolina Leaf Roller

Hi Justin,
WE are having trouble providing you with a definitive identification, but we can tell you this is not a Longhorn Beetle.  This is an Orthopteran in the suborder Ensifera, the Longhorned Orthoptera.  Furthermore, we believe it is an immature Katydid in the family Tettigoniidae, and the presence of an ovipositor indicates it is a female.  This does not appear to be a shed exoskeleton, as there is no evidence of a splitting along the dorsal surface which is where the newly metamorphosed insect would emerge from a cast-off exuvia.  Your image is not as sharp as we would like, and we are uncertain if those are spines on the body, or perhaps the remnants of a fungal infection.  There are several examples on the Field Biology in Southeastern Ohio page of Carolina Leaf Rollers infected with
 Cordyceps fungus that look very similar to your image, and we believe that might be an accurate identification.  The description on the site states:  “Another body invading fungus is Cordyceps. They are known to attack at least a dozen different orders of insects. This is a Carolina Leafroller, Camptonotus carolinensis, a katydid relative.  The dark spot at the base of the abdomen, and the long ovipositor verify this as a female leafroller. Cordyceps fungi may be more familiar to some with regards to ants. This is the same genus that affects the brains of certain ants, turning them into zombies. They climb to high points on vegetation, then the fungal spores spring out of their head. Infected ants are recognized by the colony, and individuals are removed so they won’t cause the entire population to die.”  So, after our research, we are concluding that this is a female Carolina Leaf Roller, a Raspy Cricket, that has been infected by Cordyceps fungus.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: IS THIS GRASSHOPPER /WASP?
Location: RIVERLAND. SOUTH AUSTRALIA.
January 16, 2013 9:32 am
CAN YOU PLEASE IDENTIFY THIS BUG FOR ME AND IS THERE LIKELY TO BE MORE OF THEM HERE. THANKYOU.
Signature: GRANNY

Raspy Cricket

Dear GRANNY,
You really don’t need to worry much about this Raspy Cricket in the family Gryllacrididae and likely in the genus
Ametrus.  We identified it from our own archives thanks to the input of a noted Katydid expert, Piotr Naskrecki.  What appears to be a stinger is actually the females ovipositor, an organ used in the laying of eggs.

THANKYOU DANIEL FOR YOUR FAST REPLY…I AM VISION IMPAIRED AND ACTUALLY THOUGHT IT WAS A HUGE SPIDER THAT LANDED ON MY SHOULDER..I SCREAMED SO FRIENDS CAME RUNNING AND FOUND THE INSECT..IT WAS THEY WHO NEEDED IT IDENTIFIED AND TY SOO MUCH…GOOD LUCK WITH YOUR GREAT WORK..GRANNY..

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination