Currently viewing the category: "Crickets, Camel Crickets and Mole Crickets"
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Subject: Very confused!!
Location: Kennesaw, GA
October 3, 2015 2:57 pm
Hi Bugman!
We found this bug in one of retail stores. It was about 2-3 inches long. It has very weird front feet.
Signature: Jessica

Mole Cricket

Mole Cricket

Dear Jessica,
The reason this Mole Cricket has “very weird front feet” is that they are used to tunnel underground and they are perfectly adapted for subterranean burrowing.  Some species of Mole Crickets can fly and they are attracted to lights, which probably explains why this individual was found in your retail store.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: what is this bug?
Location: Morgan County, Tennessee
September 28, 2015 10:08 pm
We caught this inside a metal processing plant in East Tennessee. Can you identify it please?
Signature: Kent a. Warren

Mole Cricket

Mole Cricket

Dear Kent,
This is a Mole Cricket, a subterranean insect that uses its powerful front legs to dig beneath the surface.  Some species fly and are attracted to lights.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Help…
Location: NC
September 25, 2015 12:58 am
Me and a few coworkers saw this bug at work yesterday and I thought it was a baby mantis but coworkers think differently. It jumps and also has wings that you can see in photo. Thanks for your help.
Signature: A Puzzled Working Woman

Snowy Tree Cricket

Snowy Tree Cricket

Dear Puzzled Working Woman,
We believe your Tree Cricket is a Snowy Tree Cricket, a species sometimes called a Thermometer Cricket because it can be used in lieu of a thermometer to determine the temperature.  Like many other Orthopterans, the Snowy Tree Cricket uses sound to attract a mate, and according to Charles Hogue in his wonderful book
Insects of the Los Angeles Basin, one can determine the temperature in degrees Fahrenheit:  “if one counts the number of chirps in 13 seconds and adds 40.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Whats That Bug
Location: Northeast Ohio
September 24, 2015 4:13 am
Photo taken in Northeast Ohio yesterday, do you know what this bug is? A second question for you: my four-year-old is a prolific bug catcher. Do you have any advice on a bug that might make a good indoor “pet” that she could keep alive for a while indoors?
Signature: Kelly

Tree Cricket

Tree Cricket

Dear Kelly,
This is a Tree Cricket, and we believe it is a male Two Spotted Tree Cricket,
Neoxabea bipunctata.  We believe this Tree Cricket is an excellent candidate for an indoor pet, and it can be kept in a small aquarium used as a terrarium with a screened to keep the Tree Cricket confined.  According to BugGuide:  “Two-spotted Tree Cricket, can be found on a wide variety of vegetation including (but not restricted to): Grapevine, Sunflower, Maple Tree, White Pine Tree, Apple Tree, Post Oak Tree. They are generally high on tall plants or in trees” and it “Presumably feeds on plants.”  In addition to being interesting to watch, there is an additional advantage to keeping a Tree Cricket as a pet.  According to BugGuide:  “Males sing mostly at night: a 10-second trill followed by several seconds of silence, then a trill again.”  We believe Tree Crickets generally live a single season, and their lives are often cut short by an early frost.  Keeping a pet Tree Cricket should extend the life of the individual by providing a more temperate environment free of killing frosts.

Awesome information! Thank you very much for taking the time to email!

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is it
Location: Nassau county long island
September 22, 2015 10:36 am
Can you tell what bug this is
Photo taken Nassau county Long Island sept 2015
Thank you
Signature: Regards

Field Cricket

Field Cricket

This is a Field Cricket and it is missing one of its hind, jumping legs.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Insect that looks like a machine
Location: ajax, ontario
September 16, 2015 12:51 pm
Love your site. Thanks so much for all the bugs you have identified for me so far. I think this bug might be hard to identify I got only one shot of it and looking at it I have no idea what it is. It was very tiny, size of long grain rice.
It was digging in the sand in front of Sobeys warehouse in Ajax Ontario. I was taking pictures of sand bees. The sandy area is very close to a pond. I am sorry I only have one shot It took me a while to find it on camera and it dug underground after the first shot.
Signature: terri martin

Mystery Insect

Pygmy Mole Cricket

Hi Terri,
This is a mystery.  It looks vaguely Orthopteran, and the antennae reminds us of a beetle.  We have written to Eric Eaton for assistance.

Eric Eaton Responds
Daniel:
… The insect is indeed an orthopteran, a “pygmy mole cricket,” family Tridactylidae.  This one is probably Neotridactylus apicalis, the “Larger Pygmy Mole Cricket.”  They are not true crickets of course, and are actually more closely allied to grasshoppers.  They are common in sandy riverbanks, but because they are subterranean for the most part they are seldom seen.  Would love to use this image in my talk on grasshoppers, if the photographer would grant permission for “educational use.”  Thanks.
Eric

Hi Daniel
I do have a few more shots  of the cricket. I am willing to send and Eric can use the image.  I am working nights at work right now so give me a few days and I will send you what I have.
I am doing a potential showing of my pictures at a gallery next year.
Thanks so much
Terri

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination