Currently viewing the category: "Crickets, Camel Crickets and Mole Crickets"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this from the Peruvian Jungle?
Location: Southeast Peru (Manu National Park)
January 11, 2014 3:35 pm
Dear Bugman,
I hope you can help me to identify this creature which we encountered on a recent trip to the Peruvian Amazon Lowlands. I first saw it peeping out of a little groundhole in the mud on the riverbank, and some hours later it jumped out of my wife’s rubber boot ( At least I think it was the same creature). It then gave me some seconds to take its picture before running away. We were very intrigued by this creature, which was about 3 to 4 inches long.
Thank you for your help!
Signature: Frank

Mole Cricket

Mole Cricket

Dear Frank,
This is just about the most beautiful Mole Cricket in the family Gryllotalpidae (See BugGuide) we have ever seen, and we have gotten Mole Cricket images from Australia, Europe, North America, Africa, the Middle East and even islands like Madagascar.  We even have attempted the identification of a Mole Cricket from a drawing.

Update:  January 12, 2014
We forgot to mention that those appear to be Termite wings near the Mole Cricket.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Please help!
Location: Alaska
December 28, 2013 9:31 am
This was in my bath tub and I’ve never seen this kind of bug before!
Signature: KMB

Cricket

Cricket

Dear KMB,
This is some species of Cricket in the family Gryllidae, and after searching through images on BugGuide, we believe the long pointed wings most closely resemble the characteristics of the Robust Ground Crickets in the genus
Allonemobius.  The dark head and brown wings are also a characteristic we are trying to match.  The image of the Striped Ground Cricket, Allonemobius fasciatus, on PBase is a pretty close match.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What’s That Bug
Location: Eastern NC
December 13, 2013 2:50 pm
Can you identify?
Signature: Denise Jones

Camel Cricket

Camel Cricket

Dear Denise,
This is a Camel Cricket and it is missing one of its hind legs which allow it to jump for significant distances.  Camel Crickets like dark and damp places, and they are often found in basements and cellars.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bug
Location: Louisiana
December 4, 2013 1:48 pm
Please identify this bug
Signature: Broc Mann

Mole Cricket

Mole Cricket

Dear Broc Mann,
This appears to be a Mole Cricket on its back.  We hope it righted itself and walked away from your encounter.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: DAFUQ IS THIS BUG?!?!
Location: cyprus
December 2, 2013 7:17 am
about 6cm
Signature: NIKOLEXIS

Mole Cricket

Mole Cricket

Dear NIKOLEXIS,
This Mole Cricket in the family Gryllotalpidae.  Except during the months from December through February, when we have an upsurge in identification requests from Australia because of the southern hemisphere summer, most of the mail we received comes from the United States of America.  We get Mole Cricket identification requests from all over the world, including Australia, Africa, North AmericaEurope and the Middle East, and though we cannot locate any submissions from South America, we are confident that Mole Crickets can also be found there.  They are subterranean dwellers that use their front legs to dig quickly through the soil.  Some species can fly and they are attracted to lights.   

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this
Location: Baltimore, MD
November 26, 2013 4:53 pm
I am finding this spider/bug daily in my home. I would like to know what it is? If it is dangerous to my family? And how do I rid my home of it?
Signature: F Johnson

Camel Cricket

Camel Cricket

Dear F Johnson,
This is a Camel Cricket, and they are generally found in damp, dark places like basements where they feed on a variety of organic matter including paper and fabric.  Though they may become a nuisance if they are plentiful, they are benign creatures that will not pose any danger to your family.  According to BugGuide:  “If these occur in a house the best treatment is to remove them and their breeding habitat – cool moist dark places such as piles of logs or boards in basements. A clean dry home will not be a welcoming place for these guys. Although they are scary-looking they are basically harmless to humans, except perhaps for minor damage to stored items, and are easily discouraged by eliminating the dark damp habitat they prefer.”  With ocean levels rising due to global warming, inhabitants of coastal cities might find that it is getting increasingly difficult to keep basements from being overly damp, thus contributing to a rise in the populations of creatures that inhabit damp, dark environments.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination