Currently viewing the category: "Crickets, Camel Crickets and Mole Crickets"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this?
Location: Gaitlinburg TN USA
May 10, 2014 3:21 pm
Hi , my name is Justin I collect insects as a hobby and have taken a couple entomology classes, but I can’t ID this insect. It looks like some sort of a longhorn beetle . But I believe this is husk or shell. Is this possibly a nymph stage of an insect? This was found in November 2013 near Gaitlinburg TN USA.
Signature: Justin. T

Unknown Katydid Nymph

Fungus Infected female Carolina Leaf Roller

Hi Justin,
WE are having trouble providing you with a definitive identification, but we can tell you this is not a Longhorn Beetle.  This is an Orthopteran in the suborder Ensifera, the Longhorned Orthoptera.  Furthermore, we believe it is an immature Katydid in the family Tettigoniidae, and the presence of an ovipositor indicates it is a female.  This does not appear to be a shed exoskeleton, as there is no evidence of a splitting along the dorsal surface which is where the newly metamorphosed insect would emerge from a cast-off exuvia.  Your image is not as sharp as we would like, and we are uncertain if those are spines on the body, or perhaps the remnants of a fungal infection.  There are several examples on the Field Biology in Southeastern Ohio page of Carolina Leaf Rollers infected with
 Cordyceps fungus that look very similar to your image, and we believe that might be an accurate identification.  The description on the site states:  “Another body invading fungus is Cordyceps. They are known to attack at least a dozen different orders of insects. This is a Carolina Leafroller, Camptonotus carolinensis, a katydid relative.  The dark spot at the base of the abdomen, and the long ovipositor verify this as a female leafroller. Cordyceps fungi may be more familiar to some with regards to ants. This is the same genus that affects the brains of certain ants, turning them into zombies. They climb to high points on vegetation, then the fungal spores spring out of their head. Infected ants are recognized by the colony, and individuals are removed so they won’t cause the entire population to die.”  So, after our research, we are concluding that this is a female Carolina Leaf Roller, a Raspy Cricket, that has been infected by Cordyceps fungus.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Praying Mantis eating a Cricket?
Location: East Rochester, New York
May 10, 2014 6:50 pm
Hi guys,
I saw this praying mantis eating some sort of bug and immediately thought of your site and the occasional bug on bug carnage pics that would be featured, so here you go! The second picture is some other bug at the same location that I see once in a while. It’s probably not a shield bug but is kinda close in shape. Both pictures were taken mid to late September 2013. And thank you for the great website it helped us identify the house centipedes we have and made them a little less creepy to encounter!
Signature: Veronica

Preying Mantis eats Cricket

Preying Mantis eats Cricket

Hi Veronica,
Thanks for sending us your documentation of a Preying Mantis eating a Cricket, however we want to correct one misconception in your email.  We do not consider anything to be “bug on bug carnage.”  We don’t believe the lower beasts kill one another without good reason, like for food or to defend themselves.  Rather, we have a Food Chain tag that includes images of insects or other creatures preying upon others for food, and we have an Unnecessary Carnage tag reserved for humans, who out of ignorance, kill lower beasts because of fear, misconception or just plain torture.  Your second image is an invasive, exotic Brown Marmorated Stink Bug.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Weird bug
Location: South west Sydney, Australia
May 4, 2014 3:21 am
I found this in my hallway today. Never seen anything like it before and nobody else knows what it is. Can you help?
Signature: Laura

Mole Cricket

Mole Cricket

Hi Laura,
This is a Mole Cricket, and we field identification requests for Mole Crickets from all over the world.  We just responded to a query from Florida, but as the image was quite blurry, we did not create a posting.  We are creating a posting from your request and image.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Saudi Arabian bug
Location: Tabuk, Saudi Arabia
April 6, 2014 8:33 pm
Hello Bugman!
I’m currently living in Tabuk, Saudi Arabia and am amazed at the wide variety of fauna around the compound. Recently I have seen lots of these critters crawling around on the ground at night. I’m curious as to what they are, please help!
Thanks, Lisa
Signature: Lisa

Mole Cricket

Mole Cricket

Dear Lisa,
This is a Mole Cricket, and we get identification requests from all over the world.  Mole Cricket identification are among our most frequent identification requests.  Mole Crickets are subterranean dwellers and many species are capable of flight.

Daniel,
Thanks so much for the swift response. I just heard that they’re edible, do you have any recipes? Only joking, it’s a fascinating time of the year here in Saudi, just last night I saw a praying mantis, very convincing stick insect, numerous locusts and grass hoppers and many species of moths. My best finds so far are a camel spider and the mole crickets, amazing!
Thanks again,
Lisa

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Crawbug!
Location: Homosassa FL (mid Gulf coast)
March 9, 2014 1:04 pm
Hello Bugman,
You have helped me a couple of times in the past. I recently relocated to Florida, and the weird bugs just keep showing up! This one was about 1.5 inches long, outside on the deck around 10pm March 5, temperature about 55 F. Photo was taken by my housemate Jackie Dunnegan who said “It looked like one kind of animal in the front, and another kind in the back!” It didn’t fly, just walked away.
Thanks!
Signature: Suzanne Niles (aka Frogshooter)

Mole Cricket

Mole Cricket

Hi Suzanne,
Mole Crickets, like the one in your image, are among our most common identification request submissions, and we have received examples of Mole Crickets from most parts of the world.  Mole Crickets are subterranean dwellers, and some species are capable of flight.

Hi Daniel,
Thanks for the quick reply!
As always, I get going browsing on your site and find it hard to stop looking!
Suzanne

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: 4-Legged Insect
Location: Daraga, Albay, Philippines
February 11, 2014 9:19 pm
This photo was taken in Daraga, Albay, Philippines a few days ago. I swear that I took this photo myself an cropped it on my computer. There are no other enhancements.
Rick Harris
Daraga, Albay, Philippines
Signature: Rick Harris

Mole Cricket

Mole Cricket

Hi Rick
Unless they have been traumatized, insects have six legs.  If you look closely by the head, you will see an additional pair of legs adapted for digging on this Mole Cricket.  We get images of Mole Crickets from all over the world, but yours is one of the loveliest ones we have ever received.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination