Currently viewing the category: "Crickets, Camel Crickets and Mole Crickets"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Insect that looks like a machine
Location: ajax, ontario
September 16, 2015 12:51 pm
Love your site. Thanks so much for all the bugs you have identified for me so far. I think this bug might be hard to identify I got only one shot of it and looking at it I have no idea what it is. It was very tiny, size of long grain rice.
It was digging in the sand in front of Sobeys warehouse in Ajax Ontario. I was taking pictures of sand bees. The sandy area is very close to a pond. I am sorry I only have one shot It took me a while to find it on camera and it dug underground after the first shot.
Signature: terri martin

Mystery Insect

Pygmy Mole Cricket

Hi Terri,
This is a mystery.  It looks vaguely Orthopteran, and the antennae reminds us of a beetle.  We have written to Eric Eaton for assistance.

Eric Eaton Responds
Daniel:
… The insect is indeed an orthopteran, a “pygmy mole cricket,” family Tridactylidae.  This one is probably Neotridactylus apicalis, the “Larger Pygmy Mole Cricket.”  They are not true crickets of course, and are actually more closely allied to grasshoppers.  They are common in sandy riverbanks, but because they are subterranean for the most part they are seldom seen.  Would love to use this image in my talk on grasshoppers, if the photographer would grant permission for “educational use.”  Thanks.
Eric

Hi Daniel
I do have a few more shots  of the cricket. I am willing to send and Eric can use the image.  I am working nights at work right now so give me a few days and I will send you what I have.
I am doing a potential showing of my pictures at a gallery next year.
Thanks so much
Terri

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Any idea what this is?
Location: pennslvania
September 15, 2015 5:12 am
saw this guy crawling across my grill today. Any idea what it is?
Signature: jim

Jumping Bush Cricket

Jumping Bush Cricket

Dear Jim,
We believe we have correctly identified your Cricket as a male Jumping Bush Cricket,
Orocharis saltator, thanks to this image on BugGuide.  According to BugGuide, its habitat is:  “Broadleaved trees; occasionally in herbaceous undergrowth, shrubs, and pine trees. Often heard calling from trees and shrubs in urban areas.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bug hunting
Location: Reesor pond morningside exit scarborough ontario
September 2, 2015 6:00 pm
sorry I know you have a small team but this guy was so cool he was hunging turning his wings into extra leaves so the prey would not see him. What the heck bugs are so cool. I am also sending a picture of the female got sight of both insects. These guys were movers hard to get a good shot. So again requesting an id. thanks
Signature: Terri Martin

Tree Cricket

Tree Cricket

Dear Terri,
This little beauty is a Tree Cricket, one of nature’s most vocal musicians.

Thanks Daniel .  Looks like I was wrong about the prey. He was singing for a mate. Still amazing.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: type of lacewing?
Location: Mimbres, New Mexico
August 26, 2015 8:20 am
What’s my bug? Body about 1 inch long, 2 inches w/antennae.
Signature: Susana Murphy

Thermometer Cricket

Thermometer Cricket

Dear Susana,
This is a Snowy Tree Cricket, also known as a Thermometer Cricket.  Charles Hogue, in his landmark book Insects of the Los Angeles Basin writes that you can tell the temperature in degrees Fahrenheit “if one counts the number of chirps in 13 seconds and adds 40.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Light green bug eating my garden
Location: Denver colorado
August 21, 2015 10:23 pm
Hello i live in Denver Colorado and have had an infestation of these bugs recently. I have been unable to identitify it on my one. Please help.
Signature: Thank you, Andrew H

Tree Cricket

Tree Cricket

Dear Andrew,
We are surprised to find out that this Tree Cricket and its relatives are so numerous that they are creating a problem with your garden.  Tree Crickets are one of the night time musicians of the insect world, and they along with Katydids are always welcome in our own garden.  We feel that the few leaves and flowers that are lost to their diet is a small price to pay for the many melodious nights they provide.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: hmmm? never seen this one before
Location: Southern Oregon
August 7, 2015 11:59 am
Okay–so I am going to feel like an idiot if this is just a currently wingless ‘cat escapee ‘grasshopper, but I found this creature in my kitchen this morning. I have released him back into the great outdoors via a gentle scooping into a cup. He has what appears to be stingers at his backend, but maybe they serve some other purpose. He also looks somewhat transparent. He hops great. At first I thought maybe a camel cricket, but he doesn’t really look like one to me and we are in Oregon and I am not so sure they are common here. He is a beautiful wheat color and he would have blended into the dry pasture great, but not so much on my whiteboard where I found him this morning. We are currently experiencing a pretty sizeable forest fire just a few miles from our house. Could he be something that was flushed out of the forest on account of the fires? I have never seen a bug like this here and I have been in this area for 24 years.
Signature: Catherine

Snowy Tree Cricket

Snowy Tree Cricket

Dear Catherine,
This is one of the Tree Crickets, probably a Snowy Tree Cricket or Thermometer Cricket, and you can compare your image to this image on BugGuide.

Thank you so much!! I read up on it and will allow the eggs to hatch for next year!
Terry

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination