Currently viewing the category: "Crickets, Camel Crickets and Mole Crickets"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

This was in my pool
Location: Perth, Western Australia, Southern Hemisphere, South Pacific, My swimming pool.
January 3, 2011 2:04 am
Hi, My name is Seb from Perth, Western australia.
It’s very hot here at the moment.
The photo posted is the second one of these I’ve seen in the space of a fortnight.
On the first encounter I was working on my bike in the shed and one of these was more or less trying to attack me?
I can confirm it can fly.
Anyway my dad took it away to the swamps later that night for his walk.
The second one was in my pool pretty much drowning so I rescued it with our brush.
I noticed it was not only trying to attach itself to the brush, but it was biting at the bristles!
Anyways I couldnt completely get it out with the brush so I scooped it up with the container, hence the water.
I was abit afraid of putting my hand any closer for a better photo… lol.
After taking the photo, it was released to the front garden. God forbit its actually an invasive species not indigenous to this region.
Im guessing because of its rear spines, its part of the cricket family?
We have a relatively large veggie patch wich at night time seems to come alive. We can hear 2 or 3 different types of frogs etc which I think should be part of a healthy ecosystem? Also lots of various plants planted around the walkways etc.
I do hope someone can help to identify this.
Kindly thanking you in great anticipation.
Signature: Thanks, Seb

Mole Cricket

Hi Seb,
This is a Mole Cricket and they do fly.  They are subterranean insects that for some reason, perhaps the pool lights, are frequently found in swimming pools.  Mole Crickets, which resemble one another even when the are different species, are found worldwide.  The Brisbane Insect website has a lengthy page on the Mole Cricket.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Colorful Cricket Nymph
Location: Grand Case, Saint Martin, French West Indies
December 22, 2010 8:07 am
I recently found this in a meadow near where I live in Grand Case, Saint Martin (French West Indies). It seems to be a cricket nymph, but beyond that I’m not sure. Any ideas?
Signature: Mark

Possibly Bush Cricket

Hi Mark,
We believe this may be an immature male Bush Cricket in the subfamily Trigonidiinae, but we are not certain.  We will try to contact Katydid expert Piotr Naskrecki to get his input.

Possibly Bush Cricket

Thanks for the response. I’ll keep an eye out for updates. I love your site!
Mark

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

any idea what bug this is?
Location: Sierra Nevada foothills, California
December 2, 2010 9:41 pm
This picture was posted Nov. 29. The bug was about 3/4 of an inch long, very flat to the ground, color is pretty accurate. The picture was taken in the foothills of the western face of the Sierra Nevada in California. I don’t know if it was in an urban setting or rural or what. I searched through Kaufman Field Guide to Insects of North America and didn’t find it. And the person who posted the picture didn’t find it in a Sierra Nevada field guide. Maybe we both overlooked it. Do you have any idea what type of bug this is?
Signature: Thanks, Willie

Tree Cricket

Dear Willie,
This is a Tree Cricket in the genus
Oecanthus, possibly the Western Tree Cricket in its brown form, Oecanthus californicus, based on this image posted to BugGuide. There is some interesting information posted to BugGuide on the Snowy Tree Cricket or Thermometer Cricket, Oecanthus fultoni.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Freaky bug
Location: Sydney, Australia
November 24, 2010 2:50 am
Hi! Could you please help to identify this freaky looking bug that got stuck in my fish bowl outside? It has 4 main legs and 2 short upper legs, no wings. This one is only 4cm long but we have seen one that is about 7cm long.
Thanks!
Cheryl
Signature: CL

Mole Cricket

Hi Cheryl,
We are certainly curious about how this Mole Cricket got stuck in your fish bowl with what appears to be an artificial koi.  Mole Crickets are common insects that can be found in many places around the world.  It is one of our most frequent identification requests from military troops stationed in Afghanistan and other places in the Middle East.  Mole Crickets live underground, but many species are capable of flying and they are sometimes attracted to lights.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

cave invertebrates
Location: Lanao del Norte, Philippines
November 15, 2010 1:12 am
i would like to ask a help to identify these specimen. i collected these invertebrates from the cave in the Philippines. i find it hard to identify them because i have no standard taxonomic keys and other references. Please kindly help me because they are needed to be identify for my thesis. I hope for your help, as soon as possible. Thank you for your consideration.
Signature: immediately

Cave Cricket

Dear immediately,
This is a Camel Cricket in the family Rhaphidophoridae, and they are also called Cave Crickets.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Need info on this beetle.
Location: Statesville, NC
November 2, 2010 6:40 am
My son is a Cub Scout and we have to do some research on an animal, plant or insect that lives off of another source of food. He wanted to do this one seeing as though we found these on the outside of our home. What are these? I can’t seem to locate them anywhere…I personally love the skull on their backs, although I am not sure if that is truly what the design is. Any help would be great!
Signature: Thank you, Nikki

Florida Predatory Stink Bug Nymphs eat Cricket

Hi Nikki,
These are not beetles.  They are immature Florida Predatory Stink Bugs and they are eating a Cricket.  As they mature, these Stink Bugs will stop hunting in a pack.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination