Currently viewing the category: "Crickets, Camel Crickets and Mole Crickets"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this bug?
Location: Omaha, Nebraska
October 19, 2012 7:33 am
Found this in our backyard in the suburbs of Omaha, Nebraska. It was in mid-September. I don’t think it is an earwig, because the pointy things on the rear are not curved like pincers. I have a 30-second video I can send, if that would be helpful.
Signature: Tim in Nebraska

Mole Cricket

Dear Tim,
Earwigs are much smaller than this Mole Crickets, a family of subterranean crickets that are found around the world.  They comprise one of our most common identification requests we receive and our armed forces in the Middle East often enlist our assistance when they are encountered.  We have also gotten identification requests from Australia, Slovenia, France and New Jersey.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Camel Cricket
Location: Athens, GA
October 6, 2012 8:24 pm
Thanks to your site, I can say I learned something today! This showed up in my house today, so I got some photos and looked up crickets. Camel cricket, yep! Thanks! This guy or gal was photographed after catching with a glass, and was summarily ejected from the house afterwards. :)
Signature: Heather L

Camel Cricket

Hi Heather,
Camel Crickets are also known as Cave Crickets.  They are often found in damp, dark basements.  The swordlike ovipositor indicates that your individual is a female.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Unidentified bug in Montenegro
Location: Virpazar, Montenegro
September 28, 2012 4:00 pm
Hi,
We hope you can help us identify this curious bug. My husband and I live in Montenegro at Lake Skadar National Park and the bug in question landed on our balcony a couple of weeks ago. We have no idea what it is. We’ve lived here four years and never before saw anything like it. Next to our lodgings is a smallhold farm where the owners keep pigs, sheep and cows and grow vines and vegetables such as peppers, tomatoes, cabbages, etc. There are also fruit trees about with plums and apples in season at the time we found the bug(early September).
The insect was about 3 inches long and was able to fly.
We are so curious to know what it is. Hope you can help us! Thanks!
Signature: Emma Heywood

Mole Cricket

Hi Emma,
Mole Crickets like the one in your photograph are subterranean dwellers, but as your letter indicates, many species are capable of flight.  We get reports of Mole Crickets from all over the world.

Hi Daniel, thanks so much for clearing that up for us. They’re rare where we come from (the UK). What incredible creatures!
Best wishes
Emma

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Please Identify
Location: Southern New Jersey
September 27, 2012 10:40 pm
I located this bug outside my store. It’s approx. 4-5 inches long. Appears to be a cross between a lizard, grasshopper, and cockroach. The front legs like just like a crab’s claws. Any help identifying would greatly be appreciated.
Signature: Thanks , Kevin

Mole Cricket

Hi Kevin,
This subterranean dweller uses those crablike front legs to tunnel underground.  It is a Mole Cricket.  We get reports of Mole Crickets from all over the planet and in February, we made it the Bug of the Month.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Grasshopper-like blackish red bug?
Location: Belvidere, New Jersey, US
August 12, 2012 4:46 pm
This bug has been hanging outside with me while I’ve been working on a table. It would have to say it is the size of a small grasshopper, and I have seen it hop a couple times. It has large antennas and then smaller antennas that have round ball-like things at the ends. It is black and somewhat reddish on the head. In the picture I send you can save it and zoom in real close.
Signature: Insect friend

Handsome Trig

Dear Insect friend,
This is a Red Headed Bush Cricket or Handsome Trig,
Phyllopalpus pulchellus.  The second pair of antennae you describe are actually maxillary palps, sensory organs associated with the mouth.  See this Earthlife page on Insect Morphology and Anatomy (The Head) for more information on the palps.  According to BugGuide, Handsome Trigs are:  “Found in vegetation near streams and marshes, about a meter above the ground.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Is this a baby praying mantis?
Location: Kingston, New York
August 10, 2012 5:01 pm
HI- My father found a whole bunch of these bugs nesting in his 2nd story windows. They are in 3 different windows always on the north side. IF they are baby praying Mantis– what should we do with them? Thank you!
Signature: Maria Juliano

Tree Cricket found in a Nest

Hi Maria,
This is a Tree Cricket, not a young Preying Mantis, and it is an adult.  Neither Tree Crickets nor Preying Mantids make a nest for their young.  We suspect your father discovered the nest of a Grass Carrying Wasp.  A female Grass Carrying Wasp makes a nest of grass, often in the tracks of windows, and she provisions the nest with Tree Crickets or other Orthopterans so her brood of larvae that cannot catch food for themselves will have a fresh food supply.  Many wasps provide for young in this manner, and the sting of these wasps has evolved to deliver just enough venom to paralyze the species that the wasp preys upon.  Paralyzing rather than killing the prey ensures that the prey will remain a fresh food source for the larvae instead of drying out.   See BugGuide for additional information on Grass Carrying Wasps.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination