Currently viewing the category: "Crickets, Camel Crickets and Mole Crickets"
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Subject: Mystery nightmare insect
Location: Johannesburg, South Africa
March 19, 2013 5:22 am
Bugman!! Please help!! These diabolical little insect keep finding their way into my house! They are definitely nocturnal, and they can fly… The cats just looooove playing (and devouring…bleeeugh) this bug.. What is it!!!!!????
Signature: Bonny

Mole Cricket

Mole Cricket

Dear Bonny,
This is a Mole Cricket, and it uses those specially adapted front legs for subterranean digging.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Large SoCal Cricket
Location: Ventura, California
March 18, 2013 1:48 pm
Hi there,
I saw this cricket on my way into the office at the local waste water plant where I work. I snapped a picture as his body was about an inch and half long and I immediately thought it was a Jerusalem Cricket which my wife is terrified of. I sent her the picture as a good morning jolt :) I took a look at the picture and realized that this guy looks nothing like a Jerusalem other than size but I have no idea what it might be. Any ideas? Sorry for the low res pic as it was taken with my cell phone.
Signature: Jerrod

Possibly Sand Treader Cricket

Possibly Sand-Treader Cricket

Hi Jerrod,
Our initial thought was also Jerusalem Cricket, but like you, our initial impulse quickly turned to doubt.  We did some research and we believe that this is actually a Camel Cricket in the Subfamily Ceuthophilinae, based on photos posted to BugGuide.  It might be the Coast Sand-treader Cricket, 
Rhachocnemis validus, which according to BugGuide is found in:  “Dunes near and along Pacific coast in California. Recorded from near Point Reyes to Santa Barbara.”  This photo on BugGuide looks close, but the low resolution of your photo is obscuring some important anatomical details.  The comments on that posting are interesting.  Is your jobsite close to the dunes?  Do you frequently terrorize your wife with photos?

Possibly Sand-Treader Cricket

Camel Cricket

Eric Eaton provides a lead
Daniel:
I’m not an expert on these. There is a scientist in southern California who is a specialist on Jersusalem Crickets and would probably recognize these as well. I know I’ve given you his name before, but it escapes me….David Weissman

Dave Weissman provides an identification
You have a Ceuthophilus species. There are some along the CA coast and in coastal sand dunes. The group needs revision. And thanks for trying to get me some more JCs and a few in those photos do look interesting. Do you have collection localities for them?
Dave

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Strange Florida Bug?
Location: Kissimmee, FL
February 25, 2013 7:28 pm
We were sitting outside of Outback Steakhouse and seen this bug running around. It was very fast and then eventually took flight. We were kind of freaked out at first thinking it was a cockroach running around on the ground. Closer look, it doesn’t appear to be on. Would love help identifying this bug as no one else seems to know what it is!
Signature: Matt & Jerri

Mole Cricket

Mole Cricket

Dear Matt & Jerry,
This is a Mole Cricket, and though they are subterranean dwellers, as you noticed, they can take flight.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Daughter’s find
Location: Perth, Western Australia
January 31, 2013 9:01 am
Hi,
My daughter found this on its back and asked, ”Is it a monster?”
Up close it certainly looks that way with a prawn/lobster like head and beetle like body. It has two stubby front limbs that are flattened and spiny at the ends.
It was found in my back yard and aside from, ’what is it?’ I’d also like to know whether it is friend or foe (I never know in Australia, most things here will kill you!)
Many thanks,
Jeff
Signature: Jeff

Mole Cricket

Hi Jeff,
This is a Mole Cricket, a subterranean dweller that uses it front legs to tunnel underground.  Interesting, exactly one year ago, submissions of Mole Crickets from Slovenia and Australia prompted us to declare the Mole Cricket the Bug of the Month for February 2012.

Mole Cricket

Hi Daniel,
Thank you for the prompt response, what a fantastic resource you run, I’ll bookmark your site and send you any more interesting finds.
Kind regards,
Jeff

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: IS THIS GRASSHOPPER /WASP?
Location: RIVERLAND. SOUTH AUSTRALIA.
January 16, 2013 9:32 am
CAN YOU PLEASE IDENTIFY THIS BUG FOR ME AND IS THERE LIKELY TO BE MORE OF THEM HERE. THANKYOU.
Signature: GRANNY

Raspy Cricket

Dear GRANNY,
You really don’t need to worry much about this Raspy Cricket in the family Gryllacrididae and likely in the genus
Ametrus.  We identified it from our own archives thanks to the input of a noted Katydid expert, Piotr Naskrecki.  What appears to be a stinger is actually the females ovipositor, an organ used in the laying of eggs.

THANKYOU DANIEL FOR YOUR FAST REPLY…I AM VISION IMPAIRED AND ACTUALLY THOUGHT IT WAS A HUGE SPIDER THAT LANDED ON MY SHOULDER..I SCREAMED SO FRIENDS CAME RUNNING AND FOUND THE INSECT..IT WAS THEY WHO NEEDED IT IDENTIFIED AND TY SOO MUCH…GOOD LUCK WITH YOUR GREAT WORK..GRANNY..

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What Bug Is This? Camel Cricket?
Location: Northern NJ
December 17, 2012 10:27 am
I keep finding these in my ground-floor garden-style apartment in Northern NJ. They are big – easily 2-3 inches in length, and FAST. They are very resistant to bug spray/hard to kill. Windows and doors are tightly sealed so I do not know how these SCARY looking bugs are getting in. From looking on your site, it looks like it might be a Camel Cricket, but I am not sure.
Signature: SCARED

Camel Cricket

Dear SCARED,
You are correct.  This is a Camel Cricket.  They are often found in basements and other damp, dark locations.  According to BugGuide:  “Most are omnivorous and will feed on most anything organic. Many (if not most) will catch and eat other smaller animals when they can. In houses may chew on paper products, occasionally fabric.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination