Currently viewing the category: "Crickets, Camel Crickets and Mole Crickets"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What bug is this?
Location: Foxboro,MA
September 20, 2014 11:34 am
Just wondering what type of bug this little guy is. He has a small round red head, his body is black , flat and he has two long antenna with 4 small greenish legs and two greenish grasshopper like legs . He’s kinda cool . It looks like there is also a little red segment between his head and body and like he has 2 smaller antenna or feelers on top of his head but under the longer antenna. I hope this is enough info to figure it out.
Signature: Hope to hear back, Thank you. Cathy

Handsome Trig

Handsome Trig

Hi Cathy,
This beautiful Red Headed Bush Cricket,
Phyllopalpus pulchellus, is sometimes called a Handsome Trig.  The ovipositor which resembles a stinger indicates that this individual is a female.

Handsome Trig

Handsome Trig

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Head of a crawfish body of a cricket
Location: Norfolk VA
September 13, 2014 6:09 am
My cousin in Norfolk had this thing crawling on his porch what is it lol
Signature: Anonymous

Mole Cricket

Mole Cricket

Dear Anonymous,
We knew immediately upon reading your subject line that you were inquiring about a Mole Cricket, and this is not the first time we have received an identification request comparing a Mole Cricket to a Crayfish.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Interesting Bug!
Location: Attleboro, MA
August 12, 2014 6:20 pm
I think this guy is neat looking, and I have been scouring online bug guides and can’t find anything that really comes close! But then I have never really studied bugs that closely . . .
He was on my back door in Attleboro, MA mid-afternoon in August.
Thanks!
Signature: EmilyRose

Two Spotted Tree Cricket

Two Spotted Tree Cricket

Dear EmilyRose,
He is a she.  This is a female Two Spotted Tree Cricket,
Neoxabea bipunctata, and according to BugGuide:  “Adult females have two large dark spots on their ‘back’.  Adult males do not have the large dark spots on their ‘back’.”

Two Spotted Tree Cricket

Two Spotted Tree Cricket

Thank you so much!  I think it is kind of beautiful.  Sorry to be a repeat for you!  I appreciate your time!
~Emily

Hi again Emily,
We have no problem with repeats as multiple images of the same species help provide a more comprehensive picture of what the insect looks like.  Also, it helps to have a more comprehensive range represented on our site.  Additionally, we like to indicate years when particular species are more numerous.  Your images are quite beautiful.

Oh I’m glad! I don’t see any others with her little fishtail end so that’s neat :-)
Thanks again!
~Emily

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: what IS this thing?
Location: central prairies of colorado
July 10, 2014 7:46 pm
I live on the prairies of central Colorado and saw this little guy crawl out from a hole in the ground around the foundation to the entrance to our crawlspace. Can you help me identify it? It was 1 1/2- 2 inches long.
Signature: Katie CO

Unknown Ensiferan

Unknown Ensiferan may be Camel Cricket

Hi Katie CO,
We received an image of an identical insect from Colorado being eaten by a burrowing owl and we are still attempting a proper identification.  The best we can provide at this time is that this is a Longhorned Orthopteran in the suborder Ensifera though we suspect it is a Camel Cricket in the subfamily Ceuthophilinae which is represented on BugGuide.  We have already put in a request to Piotr Naskrecki who specializes in Katydids, but he is currently collecting in the field in Mozambique.  We will forward your request as well.  We hope to be able to provide you with something more certain in the near future.

Camel Cricket we believe

Camel Cricket we believe

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Need ID of Insect ASAP
Location: Rocky Mountain Arsenal NWR, Colorado
July 1, 2014 12:54 pm
Hello! I’m a professional photojournalist. I recently photographed an owl eating an insect I have not been able to identify. I’d greatly appreciate your help in determining the identity of this interesting bug. See the attached image. The location was Rocky Mountain Arsenal National Wildlife Refuge in eastern Colorado, and the date was June 21. Thanks in advance for your help!
Signature: Jenny E. Ross

Owl Eats Orthopteran

Owl Eats Ensiferan

Dear Jenny,
Do you know what species of owl this is? We believe the insect is an Orthopteran, and we will search BugGuide to try to determine its identity.
  We have also cropped, enhanced and sharpened an enlargement of just the Orthopteran which resulted in a degradation of image quality, so we would prefer a higher resolution of the closeup as we have cropped it to assist in the identification.  It appears to have the long antennae of the suborder Ensifera.

Camel Cricket in the clutches of a Burrowing Owl

Camel Cricket in the clutches of a Burrowing Owl

Dear Daniel,
The owl is an adult female western burrowing owl (Athene cunicularia hypugaea). I have attached another cropped version of the same photograph per your instructions, as well as several additional cropped photographs of the same insect being held in different positions by the owl. I’m unsure how large you need me to make the image files, so if these aren’t large enough just let me know. (My original raw files are quite large, but – having just returned from my trip – I haven’t post-processed them yet. To save time I made these files for you directly from the unprocessed jpegs I shot simultaneously with the raw files.)
Thanks very much for your help!
Jenny

Camel Cricket and Burrowing Owl

Camel Cricket and Burrowing Owl

Hi again Jenny,
These new images are very helpful.  We thought at first in the original image this might be a Mormon Cricket, but that is not correct.  We believe it is a Camel Cricket, perhaps in the subfamily Ceuthophilinae.  Some likely candidates are New Mexico Camel Cricket,
Styracosceles neomexicanus, which is pictured on BugGuide, or some member of the genus  Ceuthophilus, which is also well represented on BugGuide.  We will try to contact Katydid expert Piotr Naskrecki as well as Eric Eaton to get their input.
P.S.  We got an autoreply that Piotr is in Mozambique through the end of July and we will most likely not be getting a response from him soon.

Burrowing Owl eats Camel Cricket

Burrowing Owl eats Camel Cricket

Hi Daniel,
I really appreciate your efforts on this.
In case you’re not familiar with the size of an adult female burrowing owl to use for scale, this insect was quite large. I believe it was at least 3 inches long. (The apparent size in some of the photographs is a bit deceptive, because the bug was being crushed by the owl.) I will contact the owl experts I’m working with to see if they can narrow down the size estimate based on my photos and their detailed knowledge of burrowing owl proportions. The insect’s body was very robust. Overall, it did not present the much more delicate, leggy, spider-like appearance of a typical camel cricket. Also FYI, this owl and her mate caught several of these insects over a period of a few days (unfortunately, the other captures were too far away to photograph), and all of the bugs were the same large size and very red like this one.
My best,
Jenny

Thanks Jenny,
We are going to await a response from Piotr or Eric Eaton.  We are going to stand by the Camel Cricket as the closest ID for the moment.  We do not believe this is a Shieldback Katydid, which was our first guess.

Hi Daniel,
To help us with the insect ID, last night my scientific colleagues kindly took a moment to get a couple of measurements of two adult female burrowing owls while they were in the field attaching transmitters to them. (The two owls were measured by two different people in separate locations.) The measurements appear to confirm my estimate that the insect was at least 3 inches long:
·         Straight-line distance from the front edge of the cere to the tip on the upper beak:  first owl was 13.59 mm, and second owl was 13 mm
·         The distance between the center of the pupils in the left and right eyes: first owl was 25 mm, and second owl was 27 mm
I hope this is useful information.
Jenny

Update:  August 18, 2014
Hi Daniel,
To help us with the insect ID, last night my scientific colleagues kindly took a moment to get a couple of measurements of two adult female burrowing owls while they were in the field attaching transmitters to them. (The two owls were measured by two different people in separate locations.) The measurements appear to confirm my estimate that the insect was at least 3 inches long:
·         Straight-line distance from the front edge of the cere to the tip on the upper beak:  first owl was 13.59 mm, and second owl was 13 mm
·         The distance between the center of the pupils in the left and right eyes: first owl was 25 mm, and second owl was 27 mm
I hope this is useful information.
Jenny

Piotr Naskrecki confirms Camel Cricket Identification
Hi Daniel,
Piotr and I have just been corresponding about the ID. He indicated that it is likely a subadult male of Daihinia brevipes, the Great Plains Camel Cricket. However, in light of this insect’s very large size and red color, he said, “There is also always a possibility that this is an undescribed species – North American camel crickets are surprisingly poorly known.”
Cheers,
Jenny

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Mole cricket
Location: Portugal
June 1, 2014 11:22 am
Hello,
We live in Portugal (Central) and last week I saw this bug.
I found out it is a mole cricket or some kind, but the pics I see here are different than this one. It has a large pointy thing on its back (sorry, am not a native English speaker). Never seen it before and never saw one again… Glad I made pics. Maybe it is a different one than from Australia etc.?
Signature: Stephanie

Mole Cricket

Mole Cricket

Hi Stephanie,
You are correct that this is a Mole Cricket, and Mole Crickets from all over the world look recognizably similar.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination