Currently viewing the category: "Crickets, Camel Crickets and Mole Crickets"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Ugly Bug
Location: Houston, Texas
November 29, 2016 7:28 pm
I am glad this isn’t 6 feet long!!
Signature: Donathon Houston

Mole Cricket

Mole Cricket

Dear Donathon,
We agree that we would not want to run into a six foot long Mole Cricket, though there are many other lower beasts that we would not want to encounter at that size before the Mole Cricket.  Mole Crickets are subterranean dwellers found in many parts of the world, and they pose no threat to humans in their current size.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bug found
Location: Adelaide
November 29, 2016 1:06 am
Hi there I was just wondering if you would be able to tell me what sort of bug this is, as I’ve never seen one before and quite curious. Thanks heaps
Signature: Laken ilott

Mole Cricket

Mole Cricket

Dear Laken,
This is a Mole Cricket, a common subterranean dweller found in many parts of the world.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Unknown Katydid – northwest Queensland, Australia
Location: Cloncurry, Queensland
November 22, 2016 7:07 am
This lady turned up at my workplace today, and the photo was taken because she’s not a bug that we usually see here. With a bit of googling and posting on other sites (reddit), the consensus seems to be that she is a katydid of some sort, but with no positive confirmation. Unfortunately, she is no longer with us, as a nearby Peewee (Magpie Lark) thought that she looked delicious. (“It’s the circle of liiife…”)
She does look a bit like a katydid that was posted here a few years ago (http://www.whatsthatbug.com/2008/05/03/unknown-australian-katydid-killed-for-photo-op/)
Signature: Johnmc

Female Raspy Cricket

Female Raspy Cricket

Dear Johnmc,
The link you provided from our archives was a correct identification on your part, but it is not a Katydid.  We eventually identified that insect as a female Raspy Cricket, probably in the genus
Ametrus thanks to the input of Katydid expert Piotr Naskrecki, and somehow, duplicate postings were in our archive.  We deleted your link in favor of the correctly identified posting of the Raspy Cricket.  Here is another posting of what appears to be the same species of Raspy Cricket.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Whats this bug
Location: Lat. 31.055876-long. -97.460403
November 15, 2016 12:53 am
Hi my name is Ashley. I live in the central to area. Belton to. Salado creek is our backyard. Our back patio to the creek is about 90 yards. I found this little guy trying to slide input back door. I almost shut it all the way but in the corner of my eye I saw him limping along. He has been dead now for about 3 weeks to a month now. I put him in an aquarium. He also has wings and when I put him in the tank while he was still alive and he kept trying to burrow in the rocks. Like he didn’t like light. So if u could please tell me what bug this is it would really be appreciated.thanks
Signature: Sincerely ashley

Mole Cricket

Mole Cricket

Dear Ashley,
This is a Mole Cricket, and as their name implies, they are subterranean dwellers.  The rocky bottom of the aquarium prevented this individual from burrowing.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Insect with front “paws”
Location: North America – east coast
November 8, 2016 11:43 am
I found this insect in my garage and tried searching google but I don’t know
What it is. It’s front feet almost look like paws maybe for digging?
Signature: Eek

Mole Cricket

Mole Cricket

Dear Eek,
This is a Mole Cricket, and you are absolutely correct that the front legs are for digging.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: giant cricket bright coloured
Location: eyre peninsula / spencer guulf
October 30, 2016 9:11 pm
Hi, I just found this guy (girl) on a sleeping bag left in my enclosed veranah. I live on eyre peninsula / spencer gulf side. I’m presuming a cricket although the back legs are not as prominent as most.
My main concern is the brightness of its colours – usually indicating something to beware of (& no I do not plan to kill it, just want to understand it – & maybe keep it as a pet)
I couldn’t find anything on Google (which is how I found you) it is FAR brighter than the king cricketsa I saw pictured
Any help with identification would be greatly appreciatd,
Thanks
Signature: Linda

King Cricket

Raspy Cricket

Subject: resubmission of giant cricket
Location: eyre peninsula / spencer gulf region south australia
October 30, 2016 9:26 pm
Hi, I realised there was nothing in the photos I provided to give scale so am resubmitting .
This is the giant black & yellow cricket from eyre peninsula / spencer gulf region south australia. the measuring tape used is in inches (largest numbers) & cm (smaller numbers)
The colours of the cricket look nowhere near as bright as the first photos, due to less light but it really is very brightly coloured
Cheers
Signature: Linda

King Cricket

Raspy Cricket

Dear Linda,
Thanks for writing back with additional images.  This is a King Cricket in the family Anostostomatidae, and though we have had no luck identifying a species for you, we have found a few links for you.  We found images of a similar looking individual on FlickR and Atlas of Living Australia has those same images as well as some other examples of the family.  Cab E Books has a book entitled
The Biology of Wetas, King Crickets and their Allies if you would like additional information.  Intekom has a nice page devoted to Parktown Prawns, a related species from South Africa.  This appears to be a female with a well developed ovipositor at the tip of the abdomen.  This is such a distinctive looking King Cricket, we are surprised we were not able to locate anything more specific for you.

Correction
Hi Daniel,
Thanks for the reply & info,
I also emailed the SA museum & got this response which I’ll pass on to you so you can add it to your knowledge database, even with this identification there’s not a lot of info available on the net:

“Hi Linda,
Great pet – I say.  As you have there a juvenile female Raspy Cricket.  Family Gryllacrididae Genus Ametrus. They will/can bite are non-toxic but the bite is strong enough to break the skin.  They make me jump when I catch them and they bite you – as it is so unexpected.
Feed her mealworms, moths any other arthropods. They are very impressive as adults as they are so big with such long antennae.  The adult will have wings and can fly.”

Best Regards,
Linda

Thanks for the correction Linda.  We always defer to museum staff.

KIng Cricket

Raspy Cricket

Ed. Note:  We have not been able to locate any online Raspy Cricket images from the genus Ametrus that resemble this Orthopteran.

King Cricket

Raspy Cricket

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination