Currently viewing the category: "Crickets, Camel Crickets and Mole Crickets"
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Subject: What is this?
Location: Omah Nebraska
August 14, 2016 7:49 pm
This bug looks like a cricket, but with the wings makes us think not… Any ideas?
Signature: C Johnson

Cricket

Cricket

Dear C Johnson,
This is a Cricket.  Crickets do have wings.  According to Wonderopolis:  “The bottom of a cricket wing is covered with teeth-like ridges that make it rough. The upper surface of the wing is like a scraper. When crickets rub the upper and lower parts of their wings together, they create a chirping sound called ‘stridulating.'”  Your individual reminds us of this BugGuide image of a Japanese Burrowing Cricket.  We believe the light coloration is due to it being newly molted.  Many insects darken after their newly exposed exoskeleton hardens after a fresh molt.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bug to be Identified.
Location: Northern Cook County Illinois
August 14, 2016 8:52 pm
Northern Cook County, Illinois.
This was about an inch long, found near water in August.
Thank you. Please help ID, if you can.
Signature: Stephanie

Female Two-Spotted Tree Cricket

Female Two-Spotted Tree Cricket

Dear Stephanie,
This is a Two-Spotted Tree Cricket,
Neoxabea bipunctata, and only the females have the two dark wing spots, so your individual is a female.

Thank you Daniel. We love your web site.  We see a lot of interesting insects on our land which we investigate bit couldn’t find this one.  We get more interesting insects on our land as we ate restoting  it to its native flaura.  Have a great day.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Weird bug
Location: Summerset, South Dakota
July 31, 2016 11:25 am
I found this bug in my garage in South Dakota. It is about 6 times bigger than your standard cricket. All I am finding is the camel cricket, but it looks nothing like that.
Signature: Marci

Robust Camel Cricket

Robust Camel Cricket

Dear Marci,
Most images of Camel Crickets we receive are the species that proliferate in damp basements.  Your individual is an outdoor species, the Robust Camel Cricket,
Udeopsylla robusta, which we identified thanks to images on BugGuide.  Though BugGuide does not include any South Dakota sightings, there are North Dakota sightings and sightings from states to your east and south.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Pool bugs?
Location: North Salem, NY
May 29, 2016 10:53 am
Hello!
These critters were found crawling out of the pool skimmer baskets and into the pool, where they didn’t do so well. What on earth are they?
Signature: Annie

Mole Cricket "Swimming"

Mole Cricket “Swimming”

Dear Annie,
This is a Mole Cricket, and they are subterranean dwellers, NOT aquatic insects, though this is not our first report of a “Swimming” Mole Cricket.  Mole Crickets can also fly, and we get reports of Mole Crickets from all over the planet.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What’s in my sister’s roses?
Location: Sydney, Australia
May 21, 2016 7:55 am
My sister lives in northern Sydney, Australia, and is a photographer. She doesn’t know what beastie it is hiding in her roses but she’d like to! I have been unfortunately useless. Lots of people are suggesting earwig, but it doesn’t look like an earwig to me at all. Any help greatly appreciated!
Signature: Natalie Lyndon

Raspy Cricket

Raspy Cricket

Dear Natalie,
Though they often take refuge in rose blossoms, this is definitely NOT an Earwig.  We believe this is a Raspy Cricket in the family Gryllacrididae.  This image from Dave’s Garden looks very similar, and you can find additional information on the Brisbane Insect site where it states:  “They usually spend the daytime in burrows or in leaves shelters. Both adults and nymphs produce silks by their mouthparts. They lay silk to line burrows wall or hold leaves together. Some build burrows or leaves retreats similar to those made by spiders.”

Fantastic! Thanks, Daniel. My sister will be pleased to know!

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bristle tail with wings?
Location: Northern NSW, Australia
April 30, 2016 2:19 pm
Hi,
Any idea what this is? Spotted at night in northern NSW, Australia on the 29th April. Approx 2.5 inches long.
Looks like it has small wings.
Signature: Martin

Mole Cricket

Mole Cricket

Dear Martin,
This Mole Cricket is a subterranean insect that uses its front legs to burrow quickly through the soil.  Mole Crickets are among our most frequent identification requests, and we get submissions from all over the world, not just Australia.  Some species are capable of flight.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination