Currently viewing the category: "Crickets, Camel Crickets and Mole Crickets"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Saudi Arabian bug
Location: Tabuk, Saudi Arabia
April 6, 2014 8:33 pm
Hello Bugman!
I’m currently living in Tabuk, Saudi Arabia and am amazed at the wide variety of fauna around the compound. Recently I have seen lots of these critters crawling around on the ground at night. I’m curious as to what they are, please help!
Thanks, Lisa
Signature: Lisa

Mole Cricket

Mole Cricket

Dear Lisa,
This is a Mole Cricket, and we get identification requests from all over the world.  Mole Cricket identification are among our most frequent identification requests.  Mole Crickets are subterranean dwellers and many species are capable of flight.

Daniel,
Thanks so much for the swift response. I just heard that they’re edible, do you have any recipes? Only joking, it’s a fascinating time of the year here in Saudi, just last night I saw a praying mantis, very convincing stick insect, numerous locusts and grass hoppers and many species of moths. My best finds so far are a camel spider and the mole crickets, amazing!
Thanks again,
Lisa

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Crawbug!
Location: Homosassa FL (mid Gulf coast)
March 9, 2014 1:04 pm
Hello Bugman,
You have helped me a couple of times in the past. I recently relocated to Florida, and the weird bugs just keep showing up! This one was about 1.5 inches long, outside on the deck around 10pm March 5, temperature about 55 F. Photo was taken by my housemate Jackie Dunnegan who said “It looked like one kind of animal in the front, and another kind in the back!” It didn’t fly, just walked away.
Thanks!
Signature: Suzanne Niles (aka Frogshooter)

Mole Cricket

Mole Cricket

Hi Suzanne,
Mole Crickets, like the one in your image, are among our most common identification request submissions, and we have received examples of Mole Crickets from most parts of the world.  Mole Crickets are subterranean dwellers, and some species are capable of flight.

Hi Daniel,
Thanks for the quick reply!
As always, I get going browsing on your site and find it hard to stop looking!
Suzanne

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: 4-Legged Insect
Location: Daraga, Albay, Philippines
February 11, 2014 9:19 pm
This photo was taken in Daraga, Albay, Philippines a few days ago. I swear that I took this photo myself an cropped it on my computer. There are no other enhancements.
Rick Harris
Daraga, Albay, Philippines
Signature: Rick Harris

Mole Cricket

Mole Cricket

Hi Rick
Unless they have been traumatized, insects have six legs.  If you look closely by the head, you will see an additional pair of legs adapted for digging on this Mole Cricket.  We get images of Mole Crickets from all over the world, but yours is one of the loveliest ones we have ever received.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Cricket insect
Location: Near Loskopdam, Mpumalanga, South Africa
January 7, 2014 9:57 am
What is this crickets name. We saw it one summer night on my fathers farm near Loskopdam, Mpumalanga, South Africa. The cricket can jump and fly and has holes in the grass where it lives during the day. The cricket is more or less 3 to 5cm long.
Signature: email

Cricket

Cricket

We believe this is a Cricket in the family Gryllidae based on comparisons between your individual and this image on ISpot, a website devoted to sharing photos of nature in South Africa.  We would urge you to post your images there as well if you would like a more specific identification or a correction.  The colors and markings on your individual seem unique and distinctive, and our attempts to find any similar looking Crickets online did not prove fruitful.  Your attachments were named “Kriek” and we are wondering if that is a local word for Cricket.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this from the Peruvian Jungle?
Location: Southeast Peru (Manu National Park)
January 11, 2014 3:35 pm
Dear Bugman,
I hope you can help me to identify this creature which we encountered on a recent trip to the Peruvian Amazon Lowlands. I first saw it peeping out of a little groundhole in the mud on the riverbank, and some hours later it jumped out of my wife’s rubber boot ( At least I think it was the same creature). It then gave me some seconds to take its picture before running away. We were very intrigued by this creature, which was about 3 to 4 inches long.
Thank you for your help!
Signature: Frank

Mole Cricket

Mole Cricket

Dear Frank,
This is just about the most beautiful Mole Cricket in the family Gryllotalpidae (See BugGuide) we have ever seen, and we have gotten Mole Cricket images from Australia, Europe, North America, Africa, the Middle East and even islands like Madagascar.  We even have attempted the identification of a Mole Cricket from a drawing.

Update:  January 12, 2014
We forgot to mention that those appear to be Termite wings near the Mole Cricket.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Please help!
Location: Alaska
December 28, 2013 9:31 am
This was in my bath tub and I’ve never seen this kind of bug before!
Signature: KMB

Cricket

Cricket

Dear KMB,
This is some species of Cricket in the family Gryllidae, and after searching through images on BugGuide, we believe the long pointed wings most closely resemble the characteristics of the Robust Ground Crickets in the genus
Allonemobius.  The dark head and brown wings are also a characteristic we are trying to match.  The image of the Striped Ground Cricket, Allonemobius fasciatus, on PBase is a pretty close match.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination