Currently viewing the category: "Crickets, Camel Crickets and Mole Crickets"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Big black bug in my basement and it jumps
Location: Northeast Pennsylvania
September 23, 2016 6:10 pm
Hi bug man,
I have these big black bugs in my basement. I think they are crickets but I don’t hear them. Can you tell me what they are. I am attaching a picture.
Thank you.
Signature: Vito

Field Cricket

Field Cricket

Dear Vito,
This is indeed a female Field Cricket in the genus
Gryllus, and her sex is evident because of the long ovipositor at the tip of her abdomen.  She is silent because only the male Field Crickets chirp.

Daniel,
Thank you so much. She is a beautiful bug. Didn’t know that the females didn’t chirp.
Thanks again

Many years ago, when Daniel first moved to a small cottage in the Glassell Park neighborhood of Los Angeles, he had a male Field Cricket living in the drain of the sink in the bathroom.  It chirped for months.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Strange bug in the sand
Location: Lebanon, CT
September 11, 2016 7:42 am
Hi!! We were by a lake in CT and my kids found this strange bug in the sand. It was almost two inches long and tried burrowing into the sand also it swam on top of the water. It has six legs and looked really scary. Thank for you help!
Signature: Kate

Mole Cricket

Mole Cricket

Dear Kate,
This is a Mole Cricket, a subterranean dweller that is also capable of flying.  With all due respect, the image of it when you claim it “swam on top of the water” does not look like it was taken in the lake, but rather in a blue plastic bucket.  All that means is that the Mole Cricket did not sink when dropped into water, and it means nothing regarding Mole Crickets and water.  Mole Crickets are not aquatic insects, though we have several postings on our site of Mole Crickets in swimming pools, but again, we suspect they fell into the water, or were attracted to pool lights at night, and not that they actively seek water for swimming.  We do have another account of a Mole Cricket swimming in a lake, so we may be wrong in presuming they do not seek out water.

Mole Cricket

Mole Cricket

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Unidentified prehistoric beetle
Location: Lake City, Missouri, USA
August 29, 2016 2:07 pm
Hello,
This thing came crawling up my co-workers desk today! Internet searches have yielded no information. Perhaps a sort of Bristle tail? Can you identify it?
Size: 1.5″ long
Date: 8/29/16
Location: Lake City Missouri
Thank you!
Ben
Signature: However you choose

Mole Cricket

Mole Cricket

Dear Ben,
Mole Crickets like yours, because of their large size and unusual appearance, are among our most common identification requests from all over the world.  Though primarily subterranean, Mole Crickets are capable of flying.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Red Headed Bush Cricket
Location: Mount Holly, NC
August 27, 2016 8:20 pm
If you would like to use my up-close photo of the Red Headed Bush Cricket, you are more than welcome. I found this cricket in my backyard, and it was the first time I had ever seen one – handsome little thing! Before I found out what is was called, I had nicknamed it the Darth Maul Cricket!
Regards,
Signature: Jeff Eppinette

Handsome Trig

Handsome Trig

Dear Jeff,
We are really excited to post your lovely image of a Red Headed Bush Cricket or Handsome Trig.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Beautiful unknown bug
Location: Northeast ohio berea
August 25, 2016 1:42 pm
Dear bugman,
Today i found this very beautiful bug but i have no idea what it is. It had a pink head that faded into its body. I had a dark purpleish double diamond on its back. Across its body it had a scale like pattern. The legs were yellow and kind of clear. It had two very long feelers. It had short things the curled inward where the mouth would be. It flew away with two sets of wings that were white and they were the shape of a our fingertips. Lastly o noticed it had a long black stinger like hing on its underside. Anyway i am a very nature loveing person and i have never seen anything quite like this before so if you have any idea of what this is i would truly love to know. Its driving me crazy! Thank you for any and all help mr. Bugman. I really appreciate it.
Signature: Sam ferrell

Two Spotted Tree Cricket

Two Spotted Tree Cricket

Dear Sam,
When the word “beautiful” is in the subject line, we can’t help but to open the request long before we open inquiries with subject lines that indicate people want extermination advice.  This beauty is a female Two Spotted Tree Cricket,
Neoxabea bipunctata.  Both the markings and the presence of an ovipositor, which you mistook for a stinger, identify your individual as a female of this sexually dimorphic species.  According to BugGuide:  “Two-spotted Tree Cricket, can be found on a wide variety of vegetation including (but not restricted to): Grapevine, Sunflower, Maple Tree, White Pine Tree, Apple Tree, Post Oak Tree. They are generally high on tall plants or in trees” and “Males sing mostly at night: a 10-second trill followed by several seconds of silence, then a trill again. After mating, male hangs downward from foliage, allowing female to hang on beneath and dine on secretions from his thorax .”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this?
Location: Omah Nebraska
August 14, 2016 7:49 pm
This bug looks like a cricket, but with the wings makes us think not… Any ideas?
Signature: C Johnson

Cricket

Cricket

Dear C Johnson,
This is a Cricket.  Crickets do have wings.  According to Wonderopolis:  “The bottom of a cricket wing is covered with teeth-like ridges that make it rough. The upper surface of the wing is like a scraper. When crickets rub the upper and lower parts of their wings together, they create a chirping sound called ‘stridulating.'”  Your individual reminds us of this BugGuide image of a Japanese Burrowing Cricket.  We believe the light coloration is due to it being newly molted.  Many insects darken after their newly exposed exoskeleton hardens after a fresh molt.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination