Currently viewing the category: "Crickets, Camel Crickets and Mole Crickets"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this weird bug
Location: Saudi Arabia
April 29, 2015 8:55 pm
I found this guy being attacked by ants and I wondered what in the world is this !? It has big eyes,wings,grasshopper like legs , claw like hands !? Help
Signature: normal

Mole Cricket

Mole Cricket

Dear normal,
Because of their large size and unusual appearance, Mole Crickets generally create an impression on folks who see them for the first time, and we do get reports of Mole Crickets from around the globe.  Mole Crickets are subterranean, and though they are quite common, they are only encountered when they come to the surface.

Sue Dougherty liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: what is this
Location: fl
April 7, 2015 4:50 pm
I think it bit me on my butt
Signature: april

Mole Cricket Bites April in the Butt!!!

Mole Cricket Bites April on the Butt!!!

Dear April,
Mole Crickets, like the one that might have bitten you on the butt, are normally subterranean dwellers that also fly quite well.  As though that were not enough, we have received numerous reports of Mole Crickets that are able to swim.
  We have received accounts of Mole Cricket sightings from Namibia, Australia, Iraq, Spain, and Hawaii as well of most of North America. We think it is more likely that this Mole Cricket scratched your butt with its strong forelegs which have adapted to digging.

Thank you it sure is ugly

Carmen Thompson, Alisha Bragg, Sue Dougherty, Andrea Leonard Drummond liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: what is this?!
Location: South Australia
March 12, 2015 10:55 pm
I found this massive bug in my horses water trough today, do you have any idea what it is? I’ve never seen it before and it’s kind of scary!
Signature: Thanks!

Probably Raspy Cricket

Probably Raspy Cricket

We believe this is a Raspy Cricket in the family Gryllacrididae and they are reported to deliver a painful bite, though what you might have mistaken for a stinger is actually an ovipositor used to lay eggs.  More images can be found on the Brisbane Insect website.

Probably Raspy Cricket

Probably Raspy Cricket

Amy Gosch, Alisha Bragg, Andrea Leonard Drummond liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: starstuck bug

Location: Toledo District, Belize
December 19, 2014 12:59 pm
Hello again, folks,
I’ve finally got good internet access and can try to send some photos for ID’ing. I haven’t been able to do that for ages.
Hope you have time to ID some of these.
Thanks a lot for a great site, always.
Signature: Tanya

Cricket

Cricket

Hi Tanya,
Your lovely images from Belize are much more interesting than the large number of Carpet Beetle and Brown Marmorated Stink Bug images we get from North America in the winter.  This Cricket reminds us of a North American Handsome Trig, so we suspect it may be in the same subfamily, Trigonidiinae, the Winged Bush Crickets which are profiled on BugGuide.  Again we are going to request assistance from Piotr Naskrecki who confirmed our identification of your Timber Fly.

Hello, Daniel,
Thank you for the encouraging words.  I have some more photos to send of other unknown bugs, but I’m not sure if my internet will send them along.  I’ll try during a lull in the holiday season.
We’ve never seen this cricket before.  It was quite content to sit on the fruit which I had picked, put in a bucket, carried to the counter, taken out of the bucket and was ready to wipe and bag.  Glad I got some decent photos before setting the cricket back outdoors.
Happy holidays.
Tanya

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this
Location: St. Louis
December 1, 2014 6:45 pm
Finding these in my basement all the time. I live in St. Louis, not near a river. Near hwys 170 and 64. Let me know. They hop very fast away when scared. What would you suggest I do about getting rid of these in a non harmful way
Signature: Brad

Camel Cricket

Camel Cricket

Dear Brad,
Camel Crickets prefer damp and dark conditions that are generally found in basements.  Making your basement brighter and drier should help.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this bug??
Location: San Angelo, Texas
November 28, 2014 11:54 pm
I live in West Texas, and this little guy was making a HORRIFICALLY loud continuous chirping sound for hours until we found him. Can you identify it for us?
Signature: Delilah

Thermometer Cricket

Thermometer Cricket

Dear Delilah,
Though you letter is not clear about the specific location, we are speculating that based on the information you provided that this Snowy Tree Cricket was found inside the home, hence the rigorous and lengthy search.  Snowy Tree Crickets are found in much of North America.  Snowy Tree Crickets are also known as Thermometer Crickets.  Charles Hogue, in his landmark book Insects of the Los Angeles Basin writes that you can tell the temperature in degrees Fahrenheit “if one counts the number of chirps in 13 seconds and adds 40.”  According to BugGuide:  “These are the crickets you hear in movies and on TV when they want to show that it’s out in nature and very quiet.”  Lowering the thermostat will slow the chirping.

Bea Oliver, Amy Gosch, Sue Dougherty liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination