Currently viewing the category: "Crickets, Camel Crickets and Mole Crickets"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What’s in my sister’s roses?
Location: Sydney, Australia
May 21, 2016 7:55 am
My sister lives in northern Sydney, Australia, and is a photographer. She doesn’t know what beastie it is hiding in her roses but she’d like to! I have been unfortunately useless. Lots of people are suggesting earwig, but it doesn’t look like an earwig to me at all. Any help greatly appreciated!
Signature: Natalie Lyndon

Raspy Cricket

Raspy Cricket

Dear Natalie,
Though they often take refuge in rose blossoms, this is definitely NOT an Earwig.  We believe this is a Raspy Cricket in the family Gryllacrididae.  This image from Dave’s Garden looks very similar, and you can find additional information on the Brisbane Insect site where it states:  “They usually spend the daytime in burrows or in leaves shelters. Both adults and nymphs produce silks by their mouthparts. They lay silk to line burrows wall or hold leaves together. Some build burrows or leaves retreats similar to those made by spiders.”

Fantastic! Thanks, Daniel. My sister will be pleased to know!

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bristle tail with wings?
Location: Northern NSW, Australia
April 30, 2016 2:19 pm
Hi,
Any idea what this is? Spotted at night in northern NSW, Australia on the 29th April. Approx 2.5 inches long.
Looks like it has small wings.
Signature: Martin

Mole Cricket

Mole Cricket

Dear Martin,
This Mole Cricket is a subterranean insect that uses its front legs to burrow quickly through the soil.  Mole Crickets are among our most frequent identification requests, and we get submissions from all over the world, not just Australia.  Some species are capable of flight.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Hey
Location: Nc
April 25, 2016 8:28 pm
I was outside and I found this wired bug and was wondering if you could tell me what it is that would be cool thanks Mr bug man :)
Signature: Chris

Camel Cricket

Camel Cricket

Hey Chris,
This is a Camel Cricket.  They are fond of dark, damp recesses, and they are frequently found in basements.  According to BugGuide:  “Most are omnivorous and will feed on most anything organic. Many (if not most) will catch and eat other smaller animals when they can. In houses may chew on paper products, occasionally fabric.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: mole cricket australia
Location: lower north shore, sydney, nsw, australia
February 14, 2016 1:11 pm
Hi, we found a mole cricket in our living room the other day (sorry to say we killed it, but at the time didn’t know it’s harmless). Since identified this insect thru your site. Great site! I’m amazed at the geographical worldwide spread of these crickets! Thought you might like to know they also occur in urban Sydney, Australia! Feel free to add this comment/photo to your collection !
Signature: josy

Mole Cricket Carnage

Mole Cricket Carnage

Dear Josy,
We are happy you were able to identify your Mole Cricket using our site.  We are also glad to learn that now that you have learned they are harmless, future encounters will have a happier ending.  Mole Crickets really do have a global distribution, and we have many submissions from Australia.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Weird looking bug!
Location: Oklahoma
January 6, 2016 9:11 pm
I saw this bug in my kitchen and not sure what it is. Hopefully you can help me out in identifying it!
Signature: Thank you. -Alexis

Camel Cricket

Camel Cricket

Dear Alexis,
Camel Crickets are generally found in dark, damp places like basements, crawl spaces, and under sinks.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: hi
Location: Marshall nc
January 4, 2016 6:52 pm
What is this
Signature: aaron Chisholm

Corpse of a Carolina Leaf Roller

Corpse of a Carolina Leaf Roller

Dear Aaron,
This is a female Orthopteran, and we believe it may be a Carolina Leaf Roller, but its condition has us quite curious.  It appears to be dead and not the exuvia or shed exoskeleton that results during metamorphosis.  Perhaps this individual succumbed to a fungus attack similar to this BugGuide image.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination