Currently viewing the category: "Stink Bugs and Shield Bugs"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: orange and black
Location: Mandeville, Louisiana
May 20, 2015 3:21 pm
My daughter and I brought a bug home from Mandeville, LA to live in our terrarium. It has molted and grown larger.
Signature: Laura

Florida Predatory Stink Bug

Florida Predatory Stink Bug

Dear Laura,
This is an adult Florida Predatory Stink Bug,
Euthyrhunchus floridanus, a beneficial species that is sometimes called a Halloween Bug because of the colors and markings.  We just posted an image of immature Florida Predatory Stink Bug nymphs.

Oh wow that’s so cool! I really appreciate the swift reply. Now I can research how to take care of our little Halloween friend. I hope I can find some more. I wouldn’t mind a little colony in my terrarium. Thank you so much!!

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: vey pretty bug
Location: mississippi
May 19, 2015 2:45 pm
Will you please tell me what kind of big this is? I have never seen any before.
Signature: amy

Florida Predatory Stink Bug Nymphs

Florida Predatory Stink Bug Nymphs

Dear Amy,
These are the beneficial nymphs of the Florida Predatory Stink Bug.
  Adults generally mature in the autumn and they are sometimes called Halloween Bugs.

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: unidentified shield bug
Location: 50km south of where Zimbabwe, Botswana, South Africa borders meet.
May 11, 2015 1:24 am
Hi there. I found this bug on a bougainvilla bush in the bushveld of South Africa, just north of the Soutpansberg mountains.
Someone told me its a Maya Stinkbug but I can’t find any info on that name…
Please help me identify this little beauty!
Signature: Marco

Picasso Bug

Picasso Bug

Dear Marco,
Just last week we posted another image of this pretty Shield Bug submitted from Tanzania,
Sphaerocoris annulus, and we learned it is commonly called a Picasso Bug.

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Subject: African Beetle?
Location: Ngorongoro Crater, Tanzania
May 5, 2015 3:45 pm
WE went to Africa a few years ago and saw this bug. Ever since, we have been trying to find out what it was with no success. Do you know what the name of this insect is?
Signature: Seeking bug name

Picasso Bug

Picasso Bug

This beautiful Shield Bug is called a Picasso Bug, Sphaerocoris annulusAccording to iNaturalist:  “The colors and the design of these bugs represent a warning to predators. They also emit a noxious odour when disturbed.”

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bug ID
Location: Oxford, Mississippi
April 16, 2015 1:25 pm
Found two of these crawling on me.
Signature: Luke

Lablab Bug or Kudzu Bug

Lablab Bug or Kudzu Bug

Dear Luke,
This is a Lablab Bug or Kudzu Bug,
Megacopta cribraria, an invasive and recently introduced species that is spreading throughout the south.  We decided to do a bit more historical research on this species, and our first citation is from the Atlanta Journal Constitution website AJC.com which states:  “Best anyone can tell, the scourge began in Hoschton in 2009. A pest-control guy had samples from a house a-crawl with odd little bugs. They were brown and ugly and smelled bad, sort of like ladybugs dipped in something a dog would roll in.  The pest-control guy had never seen anything like them, so he slipped a few dead ones in a vial of alcohol. He gave them to an entomologist at the University of Georgia, who was equally perplexed.  He showed the mystery insects to Joe Eger, another entomologist who stopped by the UGA professor’s office to say hello. Eger is an expert on stinkbugs.  Intrigued, Eger visited the Hoschton house where the bugs turned up. He traced the hordes of unwanted visitors to a nearby tangle of kudzu. Thus did Megacopta cribaria officially debut. Since its discovery four years ago, it’s been discussed and cussed, researched and reviled. It’s the object of inquiry in laboratories from Griffin to Missoula, Mont. It’s the kudzu bug. With spring on the horizon, swarms of them ought to be out in force soon.”  The Bug of the Week site reports:  “As a foodie fond of invasive kudzu, some might herald the arrival of the bug as a blessing, but this bug has a darker side. In addition to kudzu, one of Maryland’s most important crops, soybeans, is also on the menu. Soybean growers in infested states have already reported important losses associated with kudzu bug.  This critter has sucking mouthparts that, once inserted into the leaves and stems, rob the soybean of its nutritious sap. The removal of these vital fluids can significantly reduce yields. In addition to kudzu and soybeans, wisteria, a widely planted and naturalized ornamental plant, also serves as a competent source of food.”  The North Carolina State University Residential, Structural and Community Pests site states:  “As temperatures and day length decline, kudzu bugs seek out sheltered areas where they can pass the winter, such as under bark or rocks, or in leaf litter, etc. They are most common along the edges of kudzu patches and soybean fields and in areas near residential areas, we can expect to see them invade homes simiilar to the behavior of another nuisance pest – the Asian lady beetle. The bugs will often congregate on light-colored surfaces (such as siding, fascia boards, etc.).”  The site also provides a link to a map that illustrates the expanded range of the Lablab Bug in the south.  While the Lablab Bug poses no direct dangerous threat to humans, they are an invasive species, a serious threat to the agricultural industry, and a troublesome nuisance when they invade homes.

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Subject: Some kind of Stink Bug(I think)
Location: Mims, Florida
March 31, 2015 9:08 pm
I took these pictures yesterday of what I originally thought was a Brown Marmorated Stink Bug, but after viewing pictures of them online I was unable to find any comparable color patterns.
Signature: Zach

Black Stink Bug

Black Stink Bug

Dear Zach,
You are correct that this is a Stink Bug in the family Pentatomidae, but we needed to research its identity.  Relatively quickly we located the Featured Creatures site indicating that this is a Black Stink Bug,
Proxys punctulatus, and this information is provided:  “The biology of the black stink bug, Proxys punctulatus (Palisot), is not well known. It has a broad geographical range in the Americas but does not appear to damage agricultural crops as do other more important pentatomids. Black stink bugs appear to be facultative feeders on plants and other insects.”  The host plants are listed as:  “Black stink bugs have been collected in cotton, soybean and citrus. They feed on plant juices, with some documented association with Commelina (dayflowers) species. Although the black stink bug is a phytophagous species, it can also be predaceous, and has been found attacking insect larvae in cotton.”  Additional information can be found on BugGuide.  It seems the only other image of a Black Stink Bug in our archives is nine years old.

Black Stink Bug

Black Stink Bug

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination