Currently viewing the category: "Stink Bugs and Shield Bugs"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: what’s that bug?
Location: Northern IL
February 2, 2016 3:53 pm
This is from Northern IL and usually appears in the Winter indoors
Signature: Thanks, Ted

Brown Marmorated Stink Bug

Brown Marmorated Stink Bug

Dear Ted,
The Brown Marmorated Stink Bug is non-native species introduced from Asia that has spread across North America in a very short time.  They seek shelter indoors when the weather cools.  According to the USDA site, the Brown Marmorated Stink Bug:  “Feeds on a variety of plants, including fruit trees, ornamentals, and some crops.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Please Help
Location: Ceres South Africa
January 17, 2016 6:28 am
Please help me to identify this bug.
We have got an infestation of these bugs.
Your assistance would be very much appreciated!
Signature: dont mind

Stink Bug

Stink Bug

This is a Stink Bug in the family Pentatomidae, and our identification was negatively impacted because one of our best sources for South African identifications, iSpot, is currently offline.  We found a matching image on Biodiversity Explorer identified as Antestiopsis orbitalis, but there is no other information.  Project Noah also has a matching image.  We found the most information on the Plantwise Knowledge Bank where the host plants is listed as coffee.  Perhaps you grow coffee nearby.  Damage to plants is noted as “Economic losses can occur as follows:
Losses due to the shedding of the young fruits. These losses are difficult to quantify.
Losses due to the occurrence of the fungus Nematospora spp. (Endomycetales) in the fruit following Antestiopsis wounding.
Losses due to infested beans which are the most significant. The percentage of infested beans is very variable, from 10 to 32% or more without treatment.
Moreover, in the great lakes area of East Africa, arabica coffee can develop an undesirable taste known as ‘peasy’, ‘goût de pomme de terre (GPDT)’ or ‘erbsig’. This reduces the quality of the commercial coffee. The taste is due to a bacterium belonging to the family of Enterobacteriaceae which has not yet been fully identified. Studies carried out in Burundi by Bouyjou et al. (1999) showed a link between the number of beans affected by the bug and the percentage of cups with the ‘peasy taste’. This work showed that protection against
A. orbitalis made it possible to obtain a significant reduction in infested beans as well as a lower rate of tainted cups.”  We do not provide extermination advice, but there are suggestions on the Plantwise Knowledge Bank

Dear Daniel
Thank you so very much for the info.
Any idea if it would bite humans?
Kind regards
Reuben Roux

Hi Reuben,
We once heard it stated that “if it has a mouth, it might bite” but we feel getting bitten by a Stink Bug is highly unlikely.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: bug
Location: advance,nc
January 11, 2016 11:12 pm
Please tell me what kind of bug this is eating this ladybug.I took this pic on my back steps.
Signature: Michelle christenberry

Florida Predatory Stink Bug eats Lady Beetle

Florida Predatory Stink Bug eats Lady Beetle

Hi Michelle,
Though both insects are predators, the individual doing the eating in your image is a Florida Predatory Stink Bug.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Orange and Teal Green Bug – Costa Rica
Location: Puntaranas, Costa Rica
January 9, 2016 10:17 pm
Found this little guy crawl on our friends patio. Very colorful and reminds me of a stink bugs that we use to have in the US. Any idea what it is?
Signature: Jackie

Florida Predatory Stink Bug

Florida Predatory Stink Bug

Dear Jackie,
Though most North American individuals have three distinct spots on the wings, we are relatively certain that your insect is a Florida Predatory Stink Bug,
 Euthyrhunchus floridanus.  This individual pictured on BugGuide has markings very similar to your individual.

Florida Predatory Stink Bug

Florida Predatory Stink Bug

Hi Daniel!  Thanks so much for the identification!  I though it looked like some type of stink bug because of the shield shape to the body.  But this one is so much more beautiful than the plain brown ones we use to get in Indiana.  Thank you again and have a great day!

Hi Jackie,
We never thanked you for providing both a dorsal and a ventral view.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Help: flying insect in home
Location: Michigan
January 3, 2016 6:07 pm
Hi bugman,
It is now winter in Michigan and I have killed at least 4 of these flying insects in my home. I live in the suburbs and my family and I cannot fathom what this bug is. We are thinking it is some kind of beetle. Can you help us here?
Signature: Worried homeowner

Brown Marmorated Stink Bug killed after entering home.

Brown Marmorated Stink Bug killed after entering home.

The invasive, exotic Brown Marmorated Stink Bug is increasing in numbers and spreading across North America since being discovered in Pennsylvania in the late 1990s.  It enters homes when weather cools so that it can hibernate.  This is a serious threat to many commercial crops as well as plants grown in home gardens.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What kind of bug is this?
Location: Northern Illinois
December 30, 2015 11:00 pm
I have been seeing these bugs in my house for about the past month. It is December and I live in the northern part of Illinois. I want to identify the bug before I contact my landlord so any help you can give me would be appreciated.
Signature: Kimberly

Brown Marmorated Stink Bug

Brown Marmorated Stink Bug

Dear Kimberly,
While they are not dangerous to humans, pets or furnishings, the Brown Marmorated Stink Bug can be quite a nuisance when they enter homes as the weather cools so that they can hibernate.  This is an invasive, exotic species that was first discovered near Allentown, Pennsylvania in 1998, according to BugGuide.  This non-native species from China is a general feeder, and according to BugGuide:  “Damage reported in the US to apples, pears, peaches, cherries, corn, tomatoes, peppers, soybean, ornamentals…” and “Highly polyphagous, reported on ~300 plant spp. in its native range; feeds mostly on fruit, but also on leaves, stems, petioles, flowers, and seeds. Damage typically confined to the fruiting structures.”

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination