Currently viewing the category: "Stink Bugs and Shield Bugs"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Diminutive Colorful Beetle from the Pacific Northwest
Location: Portland, Oregon
September 22, 2016 1:56 pm
It was a partly cloudy and 67° day when I noticed this colorful beetle moving around nervously on a hibiscus shrub. Its dimensions were about those of a mid to large sized ladybug and an unusually colorful insect for the Portland, Oregon area Thanks for any help you can provide in identifying it and for your wonderful website!
Signature: David

Green Stink Bug Nymph

Green Stink Bug Nymph

Dear David,
This is not a beetle.  It is a another Stink Bug nymph, and based on this BugGuide image, we have determined it is a Green Stink Bug nymph,
Chinavia hilaris.  Here is another image on the Journey to the Center blog.

Dear Daniel,
Thanks for your identification. No wonder I couldn’t find a photo of it — I was looking in the wrong order entirely. I need to start thinking “could it be a nymph?” when I see an unknown insect. The nymph is so snazzy and jewellike, but the adult rather ordinary looking. I’ll try not to “bug” you for a while.
Thanks again,
David

No problem David.  Whenever you get an image of something that you don’t recognize, feel free to send it our way and we will do our best.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: A True Bug I’ve Never Seen Before
Location: Portland, Oregon
September 20, 2016 6:18 pm
It’s been too many years since I took my college entomology class; are you able to identify unusual-looking bug? It was at rest on a hibiscus shrub and fairly relaxed about having its photo taken. The temperature was 64° and the skies partly cloudy. The location was the outskirts of Portland, Oregon.
Thanks!
Signature: David Hopkins

Brown Marmorated Stink Bug Nymph

Brown Marmorated Stink Bug Nymph

Dear David,
This is a Brown Marmorated Stink Bug Nymph,
Halyomorpha halys, a non-native species that was reported in North America “First collected in 1998 in Allentown, PA, but probably arrived several years earlier” according to BugGuide.  In less than 20 years, it has spread across North America and BugGuide reports:  “Native to E. Asia, adventive elsewhere” and “Highly polyphagous, reported on ~300 plant spp. in its native range; feeds mostly on fruit, but also on leaves, stems, petioles, flowers, and seeds. Damage typically confined to fruiting structures.”  According to the Minnesota Department of Agriculture:  “Across North America, brown marmorated stink bug has been found in 42 states and two Canadian provinces (Ontario and Quebec). It is causing severe agriculture problems in nine states and nuisance problems in 16 others.”  One of the reasons the Brown Marmorated Stink Bug is considered a nuisance is that they frequently enter homes to hibernate when the weather begins to cool.  Needless to say, we have no problem tagging the Brown Marmorated Stink Bug as an Invasive Exotic species.  You can compare your individual to this BugGuide image.

Thanks for your very prompt identification! I was familiar with the adult form, but this was the first time I saw the nymph form. You probably get questions about this all the time. In just the last few years it’s become so ubiquitous, that I see it more than any other hemipteran. Last winter, many tens of them congregated at the bathroom skylight for several weeks and removing them with the vacuum cleaner resulted in a vile stench — they lived up to their name!
Thanks again, Daniel.
David

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bug identification
Location: Townsville, QLD, Australia
September 14, 2016 12:20 am
Hi, after two days of morning rain my Thai basil plants were covered with these bugs. I’ve tried google images but can’t find bugs with the same pattern. Could you please identify these for me? Thank you
Signature: Mariah

Horehound Bugs

Horehound Bugs

Dear Mariah,
We quickly identified your beautiful Stink Bugs as Horehound Bugs,
Agonoscelis rutila, thanks to the Alamy site, and we verified that identification on the Brisbane Insect site where it states:  “They are called Horehound bugs because they are usually found on the weed horehound Marrubium vulgare. Sometimes it swarms on foliage and blossoms of fruit trees and ornamental plants but normally causes little injury. “

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Small yellow and black bug with stripe down back
Location: San Diego, California
July 5, 2016 11:13 pm
We found a small bug with a shield like body with a triangle like head, 6 legs, antennas as long as the legs and a yellow stripe down its back. It was found near the shower in an upstairs bathroom. What could this be??
Signature: AE

African Painted Bug

African Painted Bug

Dear AE,
This is an African Painted Bug,
Bagrada hilaris, an invasive, exotic Stink Bug that we first reported on our collard greens back in 2009, a year after they were first reported in California.  They feed on plants in the cabbage family, including wild mustard.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Orange and Black Beetle
Location: Fairfax, Virginia:  Accotink Trail
June 10, 2016 1:27 pm
Hi, I have searched your website, my field guide, but cannot come up with an ID. It looks a good deal like a Willow Leaf Beetle, but not quite unless it’s a different subspecies? Perhaps you can shed some light on this? Thanks!
Signature: Seth

Harlequin Bug

Harlequin Bug

Dear Seth,
This is not a Beetle.  It is a Harlequin Bug,
Murgantia histrionica.  Harlequin Bugs are Stink Bugs.  According to BugGuide:  “hosts: primarily Brassicaceae (horseradish, cabbage, cauliflower, collards, mustard, Brussels sprouts, turnip, kohlrabi, radish); may also attack tomato, potato, eggplant, okra, bean, asparagus, beet, weeds, fruit trees and field crops.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Pink Bug
Location: Presteigne, Powys
June 4, 2016 9:58 am
I live in the border country of Herefordshire/Shropshire/Wales. Near Presteigne, Powys. Rather high on a hill. This bug appeared on a stand of mint in a bed near the front of my house, south facing. This photo was taken today (4th June 2016). The weather was warm and overcast, no wind. The bug has a pink back with a metallic gold marking. An alternating pattern of black and white on either side, like a decorative trim.
Signature: Christine

Hairy Shieldbug

Hairy Shieldbug

Dear Christine,
Thanks to the British Bugs site, we were able to identify your Hairy Shieldbug, Dolycoris baccarum.  According to the site:  “A large and distinctive purple-brown and greenish shieldbug which is covered with long hairs. The antennae and connexivum are banded black and white. During the winter, the ground colour becomes uniformly dull brown.”  It is also called a Sloe Bug according to NatureSpot where it states:  “This bug overwinters as an adult, emerging in the spring. Larvae, which are also hairy, may be found on numerous plants besides Blackthorn, particularly those in the Roasaceae family. The new generation is complete from August onwards.”  According to Garden Safari:  “Of all the stink bugs this one is the worst. It really loves berries, especially Honeysuckle and Raspberries. It walks all over them, leaving behind an awful stinking substance. This makes all berries it walked over inedible. Like in other Stink Bugs the substance is made for protection. A bird or other enemy will eat only one bug in its entire live. Afterwards it will always remember the dreadful taste and will never touch another bug again.”

Dear Daniel,
Thank you for your speedy reply. In spite of its beguiling pink and gold colours, it seems my bug is quite a nasty creature!
I am most grateful to you for taking the time to answer my question. Best wishes to you for your interesting website!
Christine
Herefordshire

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination