Currently viewing the category: "Stink Bugs and Shield Bugs"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Orange and Black Beetle
Location: Fairfax, Virginia:  Accotink Trail
June 10, 2016 1:27 pm
Hi, I have searched your website, my field guide, but cannot come up with an ID. It looks a good deal like a Willow Leaf Beetle, but not quite unless it’s a different subspecies? Perhaps you can shed some light on this? Thanks!
Signature: Seth

Harlequin Bug

Harlequin Bug

Dear Seth,
This is not a Beetle.  It is a Harlequin Bug,
Murgantia histrionica.  Harlequin Bugs are Stink Bugs.  According to BugGuide:  “hosts: primarily Brassicaceae (horseradish, cabbage, cauliflower, collards, mustard, Brussels sprouts, turnip, kohlrabi, radish); may also attack tomato, potato, eggplant, okra, bean, asparagus, beet, weeds, fruit trees and field crops.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Pink Bug
Location: Presteigne, Powys
June 4, 2016 9:58 am
I live in the border country of Herefordshire/Shropshire/Wales. Near Presteigne, Powys. Rather high on a hill. This bug appeared on a stand of mint in a bed near the front of my house, south facing. This photo was taken today (4th June 2016). The weather was warm and overcast, no wind. The bug has a pink back with a metallic gold marking. An alternating pattern of black and white on either side, like a decorative trim.
Signature: Christine

Hairy Shieldbug

Hairy Shieldbug

Dear Christine,
Thanks to the British Bugs site, we were able to identify your Hairy Shieldbug, Dolycoris baccarum.  According to the site:  “A large and distinctive purple-brown and greenish shieldbug which is covered with long hairs. The antennae and connexivum are banded black and white. During the winter, the ground colour becomes uniformly dull brown.”  It is also called a Sloe Bug according to NatureSpot where it states:  “This bug overwinters as an adult, emerging in the spring. Larvae, which are also hairy, may be found on numerous plants besides Blackthorn, particularly those in the Roasaceae family. The new generation is complete from August onwards.”  According to Garden Safari:  “Of all the stink bugs this one is the worst. It really loves berries, especially Honeysuckle and Raspberries. It walks all over them, leaving behind an awful stinking substance. This makes all berries it walked over inedible. Like in other Stink Bugs the substance is made for protection. A bird or other enemy will eat only one bug in its entire live. Afterwards it will always remember the dreadful taste and will never touch another bug again.”

Dear Daniel,
Thank you for your speedy reply. In spite of its beguiling pink and gold colours, it seems my bug is quite a nasty creature!
I am most grateful to you for taking the time to answer my question. Best wishes to you for your interesting website!
Christine
Herefordshire

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Black and yellow beetle
Location: Riverside, California, USA.
June 3, 2016 4:30 pm
My mom is always telling me that this bug carries lime disease and to always watch out for them. I got bit a few minutes ago, and I really don’t feel like dying lol. Please tell me there’s no disease!
Signature: Amethyst Huffman

African Painted Bug

African Painted Bug

Dear Amethyst,
Though it is an Invasive Exotic species, to the best of our knowledge, the African Painted Bug,
Bagrada hilaris, is not a species that is dangerous to humans.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Of the Strangest Appearance
Location: Gold Coast, QLD, Australia
May 24, 2016 5:27 am
Dear Bugman,
I was meditating on the porch today when I noticed a small orange object. It turned out to be the (exoskeleton?) of a strange little creature. I had simply never seen anything that alien looking in the insect kingdom so I thought it definitely necessary to send in a photo.
I’m on the Gold Coast, QLD Australia and it’s Autumn here at the moment.
Thank you very much, appreciate the site immensely.
Signature: Christopher Royce

Remains of a Cotton Harlequin Bug

Remains of a Cotton Harlequin Bug

Dear Christoper,
We can’t tell by the remains what killed this Hibiscus Harlequin Bug or Cotton Harlequin Bug,
Tectocoris diophthalmus, but we believe it was eaten by something.  The Cotton Harlequin Bug is a highly variable species, and your remains, like this individual on Flicker, are mostly orange while other individuals have a preponderance of metallic blue-green markings.  According to the Museum of Tropical Queensland:  “The Hibiscus Harlequin Bug sucks sap from hibiscus plants, bottle trees and related species. Its main foodplant is the native Beach Hibiscus (Hibiscus tiliaceus). It is also a minor pest of cultivated cotton, a member of the hibiscus family Malvaceae, leading to its other common name, the Cotton Harlequin Bug.”

Thanks so much for getting back to me, you guys run an awesome service!

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: I cant find it anywhere
Location: Clayton NC
May 23, 2016 8:39 am
Please identify this bug I can’t find it anywhere on the internet
Signature: I found it

Florida Predatory Stink Bug Nymphs

Florida Predatory Stink Bug Nymphs

Your beneficial Florida Predatory Stink Bug nymphs have a range well beyond Florida, and North Carolina is within their recognized range on BugGuide.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Eggs on underside of parsley leaf
Location: Gary, IN
April 12, 2016 9:06 am
Hello, Bugman:
Have you any idea what insect would put these eggs on this parsley leaf? Thank you.
Mary Ann Sumner
Signature: Mary Ann

Stink Bug Eggs

Stink Bug Eggs

Dear Mary Ann,
Our money is on these being Stink Bug Eggs, but we cannot say for certain which species.  Here is a relatively similar looking clutch of eggs from BugGuide.

Thank you, Daniel.  I was cutting parsley leaves to add to a salad dressing and luckily spotted them before I whizzed them in the blender.  I guess I could say I almost ate them :-}    . . .  and it probably wouldn’t have been a first.
I posted the pic on Facebook and it created quite a stir.
Thanks, again.
Mary Ann

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination