Currently viewing the category: "Stink Bugs and Shield Bugs"
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Subject: Possible stink bug eating red caterpillar
Location: Livingston County, MI
August 22, 2015 8:26 pm
Found this hanging off a leaf in a meadow behind my house. I think the bug is some sort of stinkbug but I have not been able to find a match online. No idea on the caterpillar type.
Signature: Cheryl E.

Predatory Stink Bug Nymph eats Sawfly Larva

Predatory Stink Bug Nymph eats Sawfly Larva

Dear Cheryl,
This is a Predatory Stink Bug nymph, possibly in the genus
Apoecilus based on this BugGuide image, but it is not feeding on a caterpillar.  The prey is a Sawfly larva in the family Argidae, and we have a visual match to Arge coccinea thanks to this BugGuide image.

Andrea Leonard Drummond liked this post
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Subject: What is this insect?
Location: Los Angeles, CA
August 22, 2015 11:56 am
Hi, this litle guy was crawling across my bed around 11am August 22 in Los Angeles, CA. Could you help me identify it? Thanks!
Signature: Jeffrey

African Painted Bug

African Painted Bug

Dear Jeffrey,
We just finished a new posting of the African Painted Bug, an Invasive Exotic species, and you can read more information on that posting with the provided link.

Aundrea Murillo-Faynik, Ann Levitsky liked this post
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Subject: What is this bug?
Location: Jamul, CA
August 22, 2015 1:04 pm
I am located in Jamul, Ca just about 40 minutes east of San Diego. I was watering some plants and these bugs came out of the ground and are now all over the fence and this plant which is similar to tumbleweed bit produces yellow flowers in the rainy season. Was wondering what it is?
Signature: Teri

African Painted Bugs

African Painted Bugs

Dear Teri,
You have an infestation of recently introduced, Invasive Exotic African Painted Bugs,
Bagrada hilaris, a species we first noticed in our own garden in 2009, a year after they were first reported in California.  It sounds like they are feeding on mustard, a common plant in the cabbage family that has naturalized in Southern California.  Our original prediction is that they will become a significant pest to the agriculture industry as they reproduce so rapidly.

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Subject: Blister beetle?
Location: Hyderabad, India
August 5, 2015 9:40 pm
I would like to know what type of bug this is.
Signature: Rekha Sekhri

Man Faced Bug

Man Faced Stink Bug

Dear Rekha,
The first clue we had to your Stink Bug’s identity was a posting on Project Noah that identified a similar looking insect as a member of the genus
Catacanthus with the common names Man Face Bug or Red Stink Bug.  Scientific American identifies the Man Faced Stink Bug as Catacanthus incarnatus, includes a nice illustration with red, orange, yellow and cream colored variations within the species, and notes:  “Discovered in 1778 by British entomologist, Dru Drury, the species hails from Southeast Asia and India, where it congregates in dense groups of several hundred on fruit trees and flowering flame trees. Man-Faced Stink Bugs can come in several colours, such as red, yellow, orange and cream, and it’s thought that these mostly bold colours exist to warn predators that the bug is either poisonous or at least tastes horrible. The bizarre face pattern could also function as a defence mechanism, with the pseudo-eyespots drawing attention away from the vulnerable head area.  Also known as shield bugs, Man-Faced Stink Bugs have a thick, hardened extension of the thorax, called a scutellum, that covers and protects the top of its abdomen. It sometimes has two prominent black dots on its scutellum, but always has a pair of big, black spots on its leathery wings.”  India Nature Watch includes an image of a mating pair of yellow Man Faced Stink Bugs.

Heather Duggan-Christensen, Mary Lemmink Lawrence, Jessica M. Schemm, Ellen Wexler liked this post
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Subject: bug sucking on a monarch caterpillar
Location: SE Wisconsin
August 3, 2015 5:34 pm
Dear Bugman,
We have swamp milkweed in front of my parents’ house and the monarchs love it. For the first time ever, I found this bug sucking the insides out of one of the caterpillars. This was Aug. 3 at about 5 in the evening. I’m familiar with assassin bugs, but not ones like this. I didn’t kill it, but moved it to another part of the yard so it wouldn’t eat the other caterpillars too!
Signature: A.M.

Immature Spined Soldier Bug eats Monarch Caterpillar

Immature Spined Soldier Bug eats Monarch Caterpillar

Dear A.M.,
The predator is a Predatory Stink Bug, the Spined Soldier Bug in the genus
Podisus, and it is an immature nymph.  This is not the first time we have received an image of an immature Spined Soldier Bug eating a Monarch Caterpillar.

Lisa Maxwell Emanuel, Mary Baum Thorman, Melissa Cooley, Tip Crawford liked this post
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Subject: Bug ID
Location: Cheektowaga, N.Y.
July 18, 2015 5:04 pm
Have not seen this bug before. Have searching to ID but no luck, but will keep trying.
Took the picture of bug on my rose bush eating small inch worm. My roses have not been good this year. Lot’s of chewy leaf insects & started spraying to late. I don’t like pesticides but was contemplating till seen this. Do not want to kill good insects.
Anyway any info would be appreciated.
I live in Cheektowaga, N.Y. 14043 just outside of Buffalo, N.Y.
Signature: Butch

Predatory Stink Bug eats Caterpillar

Predatory Stink Bug eats Caterpillar

Dear Butch,
Your reservations concerning pesticides are deserved because broad spectrum pesticides do not discriminate between pest species and beneficial insects.  Several years ago we were amused that Ortho Bug-B-Gone illustrated their product with an image of a Monarch Caterpillar.  Your predator is an immature Predatory Stink Bug in the subfamily Asopinae, and we believe we have matched it to a BugGuide image of an immature Stink Bug in the genus
Podisus, commonly called Spined Soldier Bugs.  One member of the genus is profiled on Featured Creatures.

Ann Levitsky, Jessica M. Schemm, Mary Sheridan Page Fatzinger liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination