Currently viewing the category: "Stink Bugs and Shield Bugs"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Chinese bug
Location: Anshun, China
November 20, 2016 10:50 pm
Saw this bug in Anshun, China in October. Cicadas were singing but this was the only bug I could find. Thanks for keeping up this great site.
Signature: Mark

Stink Bug

Shield Bug

Dear Mark,
This is a Stink Bug or Shield Bug in the superfamily Pentatomoidea, but alas, we have not found a conclusive visual match online.  Perhaps one of our readers will have better luck with a species identification.

Identification Courtesy of Karl
Hello Daniel and Mark:
I believe your bug is in a related family, the Shield Bugs (Acanthosomatidae). The genus is probably Acanthosoma, and it looks very similar to A. labiduroides. Since it lacks the long tail projections that are typical for males, I would say it is a female. Regards. Karl

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Subject: Brown Marmorated Stink Bug Variant?
Location: Portland, Oregon
November 11, 2016 5:09 pm
These two hemipterans were playing touchy-feely near Portland, Oregon. One is obviously a Western Boxelder bug, but the other one is leaving me slightly perplexed. Although the photograph doesn’t do it justice, the shield bug was essentially black and gold, almost as if highlighted with goldleaf. I suspect it is just a variant of the brown marmorated stink bug; I’ve seen ones with brownish, or reddish, or greenish hues, but never one that that seemed to sparkle in the sun. In any case, after about a minute of inter-species investigation the two bugs went their separate ways. Your thoughts? I know you’re probably inundated with identification requests, so if this is just another BMSB, please feel free to ignore the inquiry.
Thanks,
Signature: David Hopkins

Stink Bug and Western Boxelder Bug

Stink Bug and Western Boxelder Bug

Dear David,
We have corrected the spelling error you requested.  In our opinion, this is NOT a Brown Marmorated Stink Bug because according to BugGuide:  “The brown mottled color and banded antennae are distinctive” and your individual has solid colored antennae.  This might be an African Cluster Bug,
Agonoscelis puberula, which we found on BugGuide, though BugGuide does not list the range for this invasive species in Oregon at this time.  Our biggest doubt regarding that as the identification is that BugGuide indicates it is “very pubescent” or hairy, and your individual appears to be quite smooth in your high quality image.  So, for now we cannot commit to a species identification, and we really like your inter-species investigation with the Western Boxelder Bug.

Possibly African Cluster Bug and Western Boxelder Bug

Possibly African Cluster Bug and Western Boxelder Bug

Thanks for your very prompt reply, Daniel.  I noticed the lack of antennal banding, as well, although there does seem to be some variation in the widths of the light and dark bands on the brown marmorated stink bug.  With a little imagination (well, with a lot of imagination, actually) hints of white at the antennal joints might be made out, but not enough to be considered banding.  I think you’re right that it’s probably not an African Cluster Bug; not only is it not very pubescent, it lacks the light “Y” or trident shape commonly seen on the scutellum.  For now, let’s call it Verus mysterium!
Dave

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Identification
Location: Tennessee
November 10, 2016 5:10 pm
Can you identify this bug? I’d like to know what it is.
Signature: Curious

Lablab Bug

Lablab Bug

Dear Curious,
Introduced from Asia, the Lablab Bug or Kudzu Bug,
Megacopta cribraria, has become quite a nuisance in the South because of its large populations and because it is known to enter homes to hibernate.  According to BugGuide:  “may invade homes in large numbers and become a household pest(1); highly invasive species of mixed impact: it seems to prefer kudzu (a highly invasive and damaging plant), but can also become a serious pest of leguminous crops.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Ascalapha (Probrably)
Location: South of Brazil
November 7, 2016 7:38 am
Every year, these caterpillars came and use to stay in different species of trees. The most commum tree is the Prunus selowii. They use to stay in a big group , normally .8 m to 1,0 abovo the ground. They are very predate by hemiptera insesct, as you can see in the picture.
Totally inofensive, I means, they don´t provoque any irritation in the skin when manipulate.
Signature: Wilsonpni

Possibly Morpho Caterpillars

Giant Silkmoth Caterpillars

Dear Wilsonpni,
Though your caterpillars resemble the caterpillar of a Black Witch,
Ascalapha odorata, based on this BugGuide image, we do not believe that is a correct identification.  We are pretty certain Black Witch Caterpillars do not feed in such aggregations.  Though the color is different, your caterpillars remind us of Morpho Caterpillars from our archives.  We will contact Keith Wolfe to get his opinion.  The image of the Predatory Stink Bug nymph feeding on a Caterpillar is a nice addition to our Food Chain tag.

Olá Daniel,
Nope, sorry, these are moth caterpillars, those of Morpho appearing distinctly different.
Abraços,
Keith

Aggregation of possibly Morpho Caterpillars

Aggregation of probably Giant Silkmoth Caterpillars

Update:  November 8, 2016
Thanks to a comment from contributor Cesar Crash of Insetologia, we now believe these are Giant Silkmoth Caterpillars from the genus
Arsenura.

Predatory Stink Bug preys on Caterpillar

Predatory Stink Bug preys on Caterpillar

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bug on tomato leaves
Location: San Antonio texas
October 14, 2016 8:14 am
What is this??
Signature: Ms. Garza’s first grade class

Hatched Stink Bug Eggs

Hatched Stink Bug Eggs

Dear Ms. Garza’s first grade class,
These are hatchling Stink Bugs, probably Brown Marmorated Stink Bugs.

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Subject: Blue and pink (Beetle?) in Vancouver, BC
Location: Vancouver BC – garden insect
October 8, 2016 5:09 pm
Hi This is a small beetle (about 1/3 inch long). It is sitting on my house fence in Vancouver BC. I am curious to know what it is as I’ve not seen one before.
Signature: Diane

Stink Bug Nymph

Stink Bug Nymph

Dear Diane,
Based on this BugGuide image, this Stink Bug nymph is in the genus 
Chlorochroa.  According to BugGuide:  “19 spp. in 2 subgenera in our area [10 spp. reach Canada]” and “most species broadly oval, green to brownish or almost black, with pale whitish or yellow margin on pronotum and elytra; scutellum long & triangular, sometimes with 3 callosities (bumps) along base, and the tip usually pale or contrasting in color; membrane at apex of forewing often clear or translucent.”  We believe they may be Conchuela Bug nymphs, Chlorochroa ligata.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination