Currently viewing the category: "Stink Bugs and Shield Bugs"
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Brown Marmorated Stink Bug

Brown Marmorated Stink Bug

Subject: what’s that bug
Location: Stockton CA
October 10, 2014 11:05 am
I live in Stockton CA, about 35 miles south of Sacramento. These bugs just started appearing in my home about a week ago. They vary in size, this one about the size ofa quarter. They can fly a bit. Saw another one about 2 inches, didn’t look quite the same but I think it was.
Thanks for any help you can give.
Signature: Lisa

Hi Lisa,
Accidentally introduced into North America from China in the last years of the twentieth century, the Brown Marmorated Stink Bug is now well established in much of North America, having made an appearance in California just recently.  According to BugGuide, Brown Marmorated Stink Bugs are “Highly polyphagous, reported on ~300 plant spp. in its native range; feeds mostly on fruit, but also on leaves, stems, petioles, flowers, and seeds. Damage typically confined to the fruiting structures.”
  Though it poses a significant agricultural threat, the Brown Marmorated Stink Bug seems to draw the most attention from its habit of entering homes to hibernate when the weather begins to cool.

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination
Stink Bug Nymph

Green Stink Bug Nymph

Subject: Black with yellow stripes
Location: Near Toronto
October 8, 2014 5:45 pm
I found this bug outside my front door and can’t identify it. It is Fall, found it mid day and it is about the size of a dime. I live close to a wooded area just outside of Toronto. Thanks!
Signature: Lindsay

Hi Lindsay,
We followed a lead to the Featured Creatures page on the Green Stink Bug, and though the fifth instar nymph of the Green Stink Bug,
Chinavia hilaris, pictured looks similar to your individual, the coloring was not an exact match, but upon checking BugGuide, we did locate several individuals with the colors and pattern of the individual in your image.  According to BugGuide, the Green Stink Bug is “extremely polyphagous: recorded from 20 plant families(5); adults and older nymphs prefer developing seeds and fruit. May be a pest on soybean, cotton, fruit trees (esp. peach), and many vegetables” and it is “the most commonly encountered stink bug in NA”, though that might have been written prior to the spread of the invasive Brown Marmorated Stink Bug.

That’s great, thanks Daniel.

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Halyomorpha halys in Oregon
Location: Mulino, Oregon
October 5, 2014 9:40 am
Hi – this bug is a nightmare unfolding. It goes by the common names of Brown Marmorated Stink Bug, BMSB, or Asian Stink Bug; it’s Latin name is Halyomorpha halys.
In the last three or four days, I’ve vacuumed hundreds off the outside of house and garage, windows – they’re everywhere – horrid lingering bug stink – aptly named – and they ruin an incredibly diverse variety of plants, fruits, nuts – and joy! Oregon weather allows TWO breeding cycles a year – these little beasts cannot be allowed to ruin everything !
Here is a link to an invaluable report that I hope the Oregon State University extension folks won’t mind my sharing with you, as word of this disaster needs to spread, and spread fast so everyone can do what they can to eliminate as many of these bugs as possible, by any means at their disposal.
http://oregonstate.edu/dept/hermiston/sites/default/files/7_nwiman.pdf
Signature: Cheryl Anne, The Hamlet Nursery, or maybe not…

Brown Marmorated Stink Bug

Brown Marmorated Stink Bug

Dear Sheryl Anne,
Thanks for all the information and the link on the Brown Marmorated Stink Bug infestation in the Pacific Northwest.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Nymph of Cadophila varia
Location: Crete/Greece/Iraklion
September 29, 2014 8:47 pm
I found this nymph on a fennel. I think it is a pentatomid possibly belongs to Cadophila varia
Signature: Nikos Roditakis

Stink Bug Nymph

Stink Bug Nymph

Dear Nikos,
Your nymph is a Pentatomid or Stink Bug, and upon researching images of
Cadophila varia on TrekNature, we did locate an image of an adult that looks very similar.  When we attempted to locate images of the nymph, your image popped up on both TrekNature and BugGuide.  We then located an image of a nymph on Biodiversidad Virtual, but it is black, not reddish orange, but that doesn’t mean there might be color variations within the species or that different instars might have different coloration.  We cannot say conclusively that your identification is correct, but it might be correct.

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Subject: what’s this bug?
Location: southern california
September 18, 2014 5:24 pm
Found this critter on my front screen door. It’s been in the low 100’s for the past week. This is in Southern California, about 30 miles east of Los Angeles . I put him in a tiny jar overnight and opened the jar when I got home to photograph him; got two shots and he flew away. Is it some kinda moth? At first I was kinda freaked, thought it was a huge tick but then I saw he had only six legs legs so I calmed down….what is this thing!!
Signature: john roush

Brown Marmorated Stink Bug

Brown Marmorated Stink Bug

Dear John,
This is a Brown Marmorated Stink Bug, an Asian species that was first reported in Allentown, Pennsylvania in the late 1990s, and which has spread across much of eastern North America.  In recent years, Southern California sightings have become more frequent.  The Brown Marmorated Stink Bug is both an agricultural pest and a nuisance to the average person as it frequently enters homes to hibernate as the weather cools.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Red beetle (?)
Location: Nashville, TN
September 15, 2014 1:13 pm
Saw this guy in Nashville recently. Never have seen anything like this in thus region, its body shape is similar to what we call ‘stink bugs’.
Any thoughts?
Signature: Cpuryear

Florida Predatory Stink Bug

Florida Predatory Stink Bug nymph

Dear Cpuryear,
The reason this striking nymph reminds you of a Stink Bug is that it is a Stink Bug in the family Pentatomidae,
Euthyrhynchus floridanus, AKA Florida Predatory Stink Bug.  The specificity of the names, both common and scientific, belies the fact that the Florida Predatory Stink Bug naturally ranges far beyond the border of our southernmost state, according to BugGuide.  The Florida Predatory Stink Bug, which is called a Halloween Bug in its seasonal adult attire replete with wings, is an effective predator.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination