Currently viewing the category: "Stink Bugs and Shield Bugs"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Of the Strangest Appearance
Location: Gold Coast, QLD, Australia
May 24, 2016 5:27 am
Dear Bugman,
I was meditating on the porch today when I noticed a small orange object. It turned out to be the (exoskeleton?) of a strange little creature. I had simply never seen anything that alien looking in the insect kingdom so I thought it definitely necessary to send in a photo.
I’m on the Gold Coast, QLD Australia and it’s Autumn here at the moment.
Thank you very much, appreciate the site immensely.
Signature: Christopher Royce

Remains of a Cotton Harlequin Bug

Remains of a Cotton Harlequin Bug

Dear Christoper,
We can’t tell by the remains what killed this Hibiscus Harlequin Bug or Cotton Harlequin Bug,
Tectocoris diophthalmus, but we believe it was eaten by something.  The Cotton Harlequin Bug is a highly variable species, and your remains, like this individual on Flicker, are mostly orange while other individuals have a preponderance of metallic blue-green markings.  According to the Museum of Tropical Queensland:  “The Hibiscus Harlequin Bug sucks sap from hibiscus plants, bottle trees and related species. Its main foodplant is the native Beach Hibiscus (Hibiscus tiliaceus). It is also a minor pest of cultivated cotton, a member of the hibiscus family Malvaceae, leading to its other common name, the Cotton Harlequin Bug.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: I cant find it anywhere
Location: Clayton NC
May 23, 2016 8:39 am
Please identify this bug I can’t find it anywhere on the internet
Signature: I found it

Florida Predatory Stink Bug Nymphs

Florida Predatory Stink Bug Nymphs

Your beneficial Florida Predatory Stink Bug nymphs have a range well beyond Florida, and North Carolina is within their recognized range on BugGuide.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Eggs on underside of parsley leaf
Location: Gary, IN
April 12, 2016 9:06 am
Hello, Bugman:
Have you any idea what insect would put these eggs on this parsley leaf? Thank you.
Mary Ann Sumner
Signature: Mary Ann

Stink Bug Eggs

Stink Bug Eggs

Dear Mary Ann,
Our money is on these being Stink Bug Eggs, but we cannot say for certain which species.  Here is a relatively similar looking clutch of eggs from BugGuide.

Thank you, Daniel.  I was cutting parsley leaves to add to a salad dressing and luckily spotted them before I whizzed them in the blender.  I guess I could say I almost ate them :-}    . . .  and it probably wouldn’t have been a first.
I posted the pic on Facebook and it created quite a stir.
Thanks, again.
Mary Ann

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Found in my Daughter’s Room
Location: New York (Long Island)
April 11, 2016 6:49 am
My daughter (4 years old) has always been both fascinated and scared of bugs, so finding the attached bug in her room at bedtime was an adventure.
We captured the bug carefully, and while I was taking it outside, realized that we had never seen this sort of bug before. So we carefully put it on the ground and put a plastic cup over it. My daughter ran and grabbed her magnifying glass immediately and started to examine it. With the cup between her and it, she felt brave enough to look at it and ask questions, like “what does it eat?” and “how did it get inside?” Once she was done, we took it outside and put it in the flower bed.
It was found on Long Island (New York) in April, just relaxing on a wall in my daughter’s room. I think the picture is pretty good, and you can zoom in for more.
I’d love to talk to her again about what sort of bug it is, and provide more info; she’s naturally very curious and the more she learns the more she wants to know!
Signature: –David

Brown Marmorated Stink Bug

Brown Marmorated Stink Bug

Dear David,
We applaud you trying to educate your daughter regarding insects, but we wish you had encountered a better species for this lesson.  This is a Brown Marmorated Stink Bug,
Halyomorpha halys, and while it is not dangerous to humans, this is an invasive species accidentally introduced to North America from Asia.  Because the Brown Marmorated Stink Bug is able to feed on such a wide variety of plants, it has quickly spread across the entire continent of North America, and it is expected to become a significant agricultural pest.  Additionally, it is a species that seeks shelter indoors when weather begins to cool, making itself known in the spring when it tries to find egress.  It is the bane of thousands of homemakers who find they are sharing their warm homes with countless Brown Marmorated Stink Bugs.  Again, they pose no direct threat to people or homes, but they are a nuisance.

Thank you very much for the very prompt reply!
I guess we’ll just replace one lesson with another.  From friendly and useful insects to the invasion of areas by non-indigenous species and the impact it can have.
Seeing as I found one already – should I expect to find me?  And what’s the best course of action when they are found?

Finding one means you will more than likely find more.  Though we typically encourage tolerance of the lower beasts, we don’t have much tolerance when it comes to invasive species, like the Argentine Ants.  We do not have any reservations to manually squashing Brown Marmorated Stink Bugs when we find them in our home office.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Our black/orange friend from São Paulo, Brazil
Location: Sao Paulo, Brazil
April 9, 2016 4:14 pm
Hello,
We really would like to identify our little friend from the image.
Photo taken in São Paulo, Brazil.
Signature: David Lynch

Shield Bug:  Pachycoris torridus

Shield Bug: Pachycoris torridus

Dear David,
We quickly located a Shield Bug on Insetologia that greatly resembles your individual, but it is green instead of black.  We tried researching that name, and we found this image on FlickR that looks like a very good match.  Images on Biodiversidade Teresopolis indicate this is a highly variable species.  This image on FlickR documents the maternal behavior of some species in the family.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bug
Location: Southeast Georgia
March 30, 2016 1:26 am
Noticed these bugs on a pine tree limb.
Signature: Chad smith

Florida Predatory Stink Bug nymphs

Florida Predatory Stink Bug nymphs

Dear Chad,
This appear to be a group of Florida Predatory Stink Bug nymphs, and some individuals appear to be molting, which is why some are redder than others like in this BugGuide image.  They will darken when the new  exoskeleton begins to harden.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination