Currently viewing the category: "Stink Bugs and Shield Bugs"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: what’s this bug?
Location: southern california
September 18, 2014 5:24 pm
Found this critter on my front screen door. It’s been in the low 100’s for the past week. This is in Southern California, about 30 miles east of Los Angeles . I put him in a tiny jar overnight and opened the jar when I got home to photograph him; got two shots and he flew away. Is it some kinda moth? At first I was kinda freaked, thought it was a huge tick but then I saw he had only six legs legs so I calmed down….what is this thing!!
Signature: john roush

Brown Marmorated Stink Bug

Brown Marmorated Stink Bug

Dear John,
This is a Brown Marmorated Stink Bug, an Asian species that was first reported in Allentown, Pennsylvania in the late 1990s, and which has spread across much of eastern North America.  In recent years, Southern California sightings have become more frequent.  The Brown Marmorated Stink Bug is both an agricultural pest and a nuisance to the average person as it frequently enters homes to hibernate as the weather cools.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Red beetle (?)
Location: Nashville, TN
September 15, 2014 1:13 pm
Saw this guy in Nashville recently. Never have seen anything like this in thus region, its body shape is similar to what we call ‘stink bugs’.
Any thoughts?
Signature: Cpuryear

Florida Predatory Stink Bug

Florida Predatory Stink Bug nymph

Dear Cpuryear,
The reason this striking nymph reminds you of a Stink Bug is that it is a Stink Bug in the family Pentatomidae,
Euthyrhynchus floridanus, AKA Florida Predatory Stink Bug.  The specificity of the names, both common and scientific, belies the fact that the Florida Predatory Stink Bug naturally ranges far beyond the border of our southernmost state, according to BugGuide.  The Florida Predatory Stink Bug, which is called a Halloween Bug in its seasonal adult attire replete with wings, is an effective predator.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Makers Mark Beetle?
Location: Virginia Beach, VA
September 13, 2014 6:41 am
Hello!
I noticed this fella (or lady) pulling a moth up the wall of our front porch. At first glance I thought it might actually be a spider, but on closer inspection, it’s obviously some type of weevil or beetle. Up close, it genuinely appears to have been dipped in hot red wax, like the top of a well known bourbon whiskey. It’s obviously a hunter, given the activity in the photos. I would say this fella is approx 10-13mm long. Just curious, and thanks so much for this amazing site!
Signature: M Coughlin

Florida Predatory Stink Bug Nymph eats Moth

Florida Predatory Stink Bug Nymph eats Moth

Dear M Coughlin,
Your Maker’s Mark bourbon analogy is amusing and quite timely considering the link we located.  This is actually an immature Florida Predatory Stink Bug and they are very effective predators.  

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What’s this bug?
Location: Chico, CA USA
August 21, 2014 5:17 pm
I was sitting on the couch and look at my window and though to myself, “That can’t be a tick.” I’ve been wondering what it is this whole time. Please help me out, and also if it helps for some reason there’s aanother one of these things close by, but its dead and all that left of it is like its shell.
Signature: -Anthony

Brown Marmorated Stink Bug

Brown Marmorated Stink Bug

Hi Anthony,
This is an invasive Brown Marmorated Stink Bug, a nonnative species that is spreading in North America.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Stink bud
Location: Wirtz VA.
August 16, 2014 12:29 pm
Please help me control these bugs at my sisters house in Wirtz VA. What can I do to control and get rid of them…. They came back with me to L.I. Last year and yes they really Stink!!! stillhairymary
Signature: From you daniel

Invisible Stink Bug (or Bud)

Invisible Stink Bug (or Bud)

Dear stillhairymary,
We have carefully inspected the attached image from corner to corner, scrutinizing all points in between, and try as we might, we are unable to find any Stink Bud or Stink Bug for that matter.
  We suspect you may be inquiring about the Brown Marmorated Stink Bug, Halyomorpha halys, an invasive, introduced species that is becoming a major agricultural pest and general nuisance in much of North America.  We do not provide extermination advice.  You may find some helpful information on the Penn State Entomology site as well as numerous other resources on the internet.

Yes thank you for your answer. That looks like the bug  my sister has. Very stinky if you squish them. They will hide anywhere so they came back to Long Island last fall in my suitcase lining and clothing I had packed up the day before I left.  Love your site, made my day Saturday!!!

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: They are devouring my figs!
Location: San Diego County, CA
August 5, 2014 12:15 pm
Dear Bugman
My young fig tree was going to have a big crop of figs – until these guys arrived! We live on 3 acres in northern San Diego County, CA, mild weather, etc.
I have spent HOURS looking online, but still haven’t found anything quite like them. I don’t think they are Japanese beetles, but that’s as close as I can come. I believe that they attack fruit that has had a bird peck at it, but once that happens, they are voracious.
Any help would be appreciated. Thanks for your time,
Signature: Kathy

African Painted Bugs eat Figs!!!

African Painted Bugs eat Figs!!!

Hi Kathy,
When we read your subject line and saw the title of your digital image “BIG beetles”
, we thought for certain we were going to be responding that you have Figeaters, which fly in Southern California in August.  These are not big beetles, but rather, small Stink Bugs, African Painted Bugs, Bagrada hilaris, to be more exact.  We first encounted African Painted Bugs in our own garden in 2009 on kale and collard greens, and we learned at the time that this was a new invasive, exotic species that was just discovered in Southern California.  Several months later we predicted that:  “If there are no known predators, the African Painted Bugs might become a very serious agricultural pest in California.”  Most literature we read indicated that the African Painted Bugs prefer members of the cabbage family, including the kale and collard greens in our garden, but in 2010, we received a report from Arizona that African Painted Bugs were found on figs.  In 2011, the African Painted Bugs made the Los Angeles Times.  You should be able to locate significantly more information on the AFrican Painted Bugs now than we found back in 2009, and we still maintain that this is probably the biggest threat to agriculture in Southern California in recent memory.  African Painted Bugs have also been reported on citrus on the island of Cyprus.  We rid our garden of African Painted Bug by ripping out the kale and collard greens, but sadly, that is not an option with your fig tree.  Good luck with this scourge.

Yikes!
Daniel, I fear that you are dead on in your diagnosis!  My “BIG bugs” tag referred to the size of the photo: I had significantly enlarged it.  Now that I have a name I will do more research.  Thank you soooo much!
Gratefully,
Kathy

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination