Currently viewing the category: "Stink Bugs and Shield Bugs"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bug ID
Location: Cheektowaga, N.Y.
July 18, 2015 5:04 pm
Have not seen this bug before. Have searching to ID but no luck, but will keep trying.
Took the picture of bug on my rose bush eating small inch worm. My roses have not been good this year. Lot’s of chewy leaf insects & started spraying to late. I don’t like pesticides but was contemplating till seen this. Do not want to kill good insects.
Anyway any info would be appreciated.
I live in Cheektowaga, N.Y. 14043 just outside of Buffalo, N.Y.
Signature: Butch

Predatory Stink Bug eats Caterpillar

Predatory Stink Bug eats Caterpillar

Dear Butch,
Your reservations concerning pesticides are deserved because broad spectrum pesticides do not discriminate between pest species and beneficial insects.  Several years ago we were amused that Ortho Bug-B-Gone illustrated their product with an image of a Monarch Caterpillar.  Your predator is an immature Predatory Stink Bug in the subfamily Asopinae, and we believe we have matched it to a BugGuide image of an immature Stink Bug in the genus
Podisus, commonly called Spined Soldier Bugs.  One member of the genus is profiled on Featured Creatures.

Ann Levitsky, Jessica M. Schemm, Mary Sheridan Page Fatzinger liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What bug is this?
Location: Raspberry leaf
July 17, 2015 2:06 pm
I found these on the back on a raspberry leaf from a plant I bought a few weeks ago. I’m guessing they’re stink bug babies, but not idea what type! Any help identifying them would be great. I’m located just outside of Bristol in the south-West of England
Signature: Lisa

Stink Bug Hatchlings

Stink Bug Hatchlings

Dear Lisa,
As you suspected, these are hatchling Stink Bugs, and they bear a striking resemblance to hatchling Brown Marmorated Stink Bugs,
Halyomorpha halys, which you can verify by comparing to this image on BugGuide. We are well aware of the rapid spread of this invasive Asian species in North America, but we did not know of any UK sightings, so we did some research.  According to a November 2014 posting on BBC News:  “An agricultural pest dubbed the stink bug could establish itself within the UK, according to a scientist.  Entomologist Max Barclay said it was ‘it is only a matter of time’ before the brown marmorated stink bug arrives in the country.  Two of the insects have already been found on imported timber headed for Britain.  The bug, which is native to the Far East, has already reached France and Germany.  Mr Barclay, from London’s Natural History Museum, told the Daily Mail newspaper: ‘I think the brown marmorated stink bug will establish a population here. It is only a matter of time.  It will make its presence felt fairly quickly because it comes into people’s homes in the autumn and winter.’  Its name comes from the putrid stench it releases from its glands when threatened.  The insect was first found in the US in the late 1990s, but has now spread across much of the country. Since then, it has become a severe pest of fruits, vegetables and ornamental plants.”  You might want to report this sighting to your local agricultural agency.  It is possible that the invasive Brown Marmorated Stink Bug eggs were on the raspberry plant when you purchased it, or it is also possible that they are already established, but passing unnoticed in your area.  It is also possible that this is a different species of Stink Bug.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Cicada killers
Location: Tennessee
June 4, 2015 3:47 pm
I was outside and saw these weird bugs eating a cicada. When I looked closee at the Bush they were everywhere. Some cicadas only had a few, but some were completely swarmed. You also can’t really tell in the pic but they have a spider man coloration in the sun.
Signature: -Brad

Florida Predatory Stink Bugs eat Cicada

Florida Predatory Stink Bugs eat Cicada

Dear Brad,
This year marked the emergence of the The Lower Mississippi Valley Brood, Brood XXIII of the Periodical Cicadas,
Magicicada neotredecim, a species that appears every 13 years.  When the Cicadas are plentiful, they provide food for predators, including the Florida Predatory Stink Bug nymphs pictured in your image.  This is an awesome food chain image and it is a wonderful addition to our archive.  Folks can read more about Brood XXIII on Magicada.org where we read:  “2015 will be a remarkable year for periodical cicadas. 13-year Brood XXIII, the Mississipian Brood, and 17-year Brood IV, the Kansan Brood, will both emerge.  The 2015 emergence of periodical cicadas will be extraordinary. 13-year Brood XXIII will emerge in the Mississippi River Valley. This brood contains all four described species of 13-year periodical cicadas- Magicicada neotredecim, Magicicada tredecim, M. tredecassini, and M. tredecula. 17-year Brood IV, the Kansan Brood, will emerge along the western edge of the general periodical cicada range. This brood contains Magicicada septendecim, M. cassini, and M. septendecula. Thus, in 2015, you can see all seven described species of Magicicada.”  Supplied with that information, we don’t know for certain which species of Cicada you observed as so many generations are overlapping this year.  More about the Florida Predatory Stink Bugs can be found on Featured Creatures.

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: orange and black
Location: Mandeville, Louisiana
May 20, 2015 3:21 pm
My daughter and I brought a bug home from Mandeville, LA to live in our terrarium. It has molted and grown larger.
Signature: Laura

Florida Predatory Stink Bug

Florida Predatory Stink Bug

Dear Laura,
This is an adult Florida Predatory Stink Bug,
Euthyrhunchus floridanus, a beneficial species that is sometimes called a Halloween Bug because of the colors and markings.  We just posted an image of immature Florida Predatory Stink Bug nymphs.

Oh wow that’s so cool! I really appreciate the swift reply. Now I can research how to take care of our little Halloween friend. I hope I can find some more. I wouldn’t mind a little colony in my terrarium. Thank you so much!!

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: vey pretty bug
Location: mississippi
May 19, 2015 2:45 pm
Will you please tell me what kind of big this is? I have never seen any before.
Signature: amy

Florida Predatory Stink Bug Nymphs

Florida Predatory Stink Bug Nymphs

Dear Amy,
These are the beneficial nymphs of the Florida Predatory Stink Bug.
  Adults generally mature in the autumn and they are sometimes called Halloween Bugs.

Alisha Bragg, Amy Gosch, Andrea Leonard Drummond, Kevin Trejo, Sue Dougherty liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: unidentified shield bug
Location: 50km south of where Zimbabwe, Botswana, South Africa borders meet.
May 11, 2015 1:24 am
Hi there. I found this bug on a bougainvilla bush in the bushveld of South Africa, just north of the Soutpansberg mountains.
Someone told me its a Maya Stinkbug but I can’t find any info on that name…
Please help me identify this little beauty!
Signature: Marco

Picasso Bug

Picasso Bug

Dear Marco,
Just last week we posted another image of this pretty Shield Bug submitted from Tanzania,
Sphaerocoris annulus, and we learned it is commonly called a Picasso Bug.

Candace Bailey, Jaye Ridet, Amy Gosch, Sue Dougherty liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination