Currently viewing the category: "Stink Bugs and Shield Bugs"
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Subject: What kind of beetle is this ?
Location: Victoria, BC Canada.
July 21, 2014 2:45 am
I took a picture and I would like to know what kind of beetle is in the picture?
Signature: Thank you, in advance.

Conchuela Stink Bug Nymphs

Conchuela Stink Bug Nymphs

These are not beetles.  They are immature Conchuela Stink Bugs.

Conchuela Stink Bug Nymphs

Conchuela Stink Bug Nymphs

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: unknown Beetle
Location: San Diego, CA
July 17, 2014 5:37 pm
I found these beetles at the Cabrillo Museum in sand Diego this weekend. Any idea what they are? I’ve searched the internet, and was unable to find a picture of them. Any help would be greatly appreciated
Signature: Debbi Haag

Harlequin Stink Bug Nymphs

Harlequin Stink Bug Nymphs

Hi Debbi,
These pretty critters are not beetles, but rather, they are True Bugs in the suborder Heteroptera.  More specifically, they are immature Harlequin Stink Bugs,
Murgantia histrionica.  Adults have a similar coloration, and they have fully functional wings.  Harlequin Stink Bugs feed on plants in the cabbage family, so they are generally not welcome in the vegetable patch, and locally in California, they are often found feeding on wild mustard which has been introduced and has naturalized in many open spaces in the southland.  For more information on the Harlequin Stink Bug, you can try BugGuide.

Immature Harlequin Stink Bugs

Immature Harlequin Stink Bugs

One of your images depicts an adult with two nymphs.

Adult Harlequin Stink Bug with two nymphs

Adult Harlequin Stink Bug with two nymphs

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: bug hatchlings on fern leaf
Location: SE Ohio
July 4, 2014 5:35 am
A friend posted this and asked what these little critters may be. I haven’t found them anywhere yet. Can you help? Thank you.
Signature: Nonnyfysh

Stink Bug Hatchlings

Stink Bug Hatchlings

Dear Nonnyfysh,
These Stink Bug hatchlings look similar to, but distinctly different from the hatchlings of the invasive, exotic Brown Marmorated Stink Bug.  We would deduce they are likely a native species of Stink Bug.  Immature True Bugs in the suborder Heteroptera can be very difficult to identify to the species level because many nymphs resemble one another and many nymphs change drastically as they transform into adults.

I told my friend they look like Duracell batteries—copper on one end and gray on the other, so they must be Duracell Fern Bugs.  J
It’s a bit disappointing that they are stink bugs.  Anything born that pretty should stay that way!
Thank you so much.    I’ll send him your answer.
Madeline Fisher

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Yellow bugs congregating on tomato
Location: Sarasota Florida
July 4, 2014 12:31 pm
I was weeding some plants on my patio & found 15 or more of these yellow bugs congregating on a green tomato. I didn’t see any others on the plant or my other potted veggies. I live in Sarasota Florida so we have where to grow veggies in pots. I’ve tried id’ing the bug but nothing comes close. I’ve not seen this type before. It measured about 1/4 long.
Signature: Garden girl 52

Tomato Stink Bug Nymph

Tomato Stink Bug Nymph

Hi Garden girl 52,
This is an immature Stink Bug, and we quickly identified in on BugGuide as a Tomato Stink Bug,
Arvelius albopunctatus, a species previously unknown to us, which is surprising as we often get requests to identify pests on tomato plants.  Keep an eye out for reproductive adults, which are also pictured on BugGuide, and you will likely reduce the effects of an unwanted epidemic of Tomato Stink Bugs in your garden.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Large orange and green beetle in Korea
Location: South Korea
June 29, 2014 5:26 am
We saw this large beetle in late June in the mountains of South Korea. It flew onto my wife and hung out for a while before flying away. I’ve never seen anything like it.
Signature: LDC

Jewel Bug: Poecilocoris splendidulus

Jewel Bug: Poecilocoris splendidulus

Dear LDC,
This is actually a Jewel Bug in the family Scutelleridae, not a beetle.  A few months ago, we correctly identified this species as
Poecilocoris splendidulus.

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Subject: StinkVELB?
Location: Chico, CA
May 31, 2014 10:56 am
I was checking out this elderberry when I noticed these critters. Excited, I rushed to the interwebs to see if they were in fact the elusive VELB. The coloring is that of the female VELB; but the shape is that of a stinkbug. Would it be possible for the two spp. to mingle such that this “stinkVELB” was the product of such a union? And, if not, what bug is this?
Signature: J. Murphy

Conchuela Stink Bug

Conchuela Stink Bug

Dear J. Murphy,
We are amused at your suspicion that this might be a species mingling, and we agree that the coloration and markings of the Stink Bugs in your image resemble the color and markings of the Valley Elderberry Longhorn Beetle as well as some other related subspecies of
Desmocerus aureipennis, including the Golden Winged Elder Borer.  We identified your Stink Bug as the Conchuela Stink Bug, Chlorochroa ligata, thanks to the New Mexico State University website.  According to BugGuide, the Conchuela Stink Bug:  “prefers fleshy fruits of various plants, especially agarita, balsam-gourd and mesquite; also on sage, yucca, mustards, prickly pear (Opuntia), and various crops (cotton, alfalfa, corn, sorghum, grapes, peas, tomatoes, etc.); primarily a seed feeder preferring leguminous plants (once mesquite beans dry, the bugs move to more succulent plants)” and it seems, based on your image, the fruit of Elderberry as well.

Thank you so much for your expertise and time, and for your enchanting website.
Cheers,
-Julia

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination