Currently viewing the category: "Seed Bugs"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Household insect with strange thick parts of legs
Location: New Jersey
July 22, 2016 11:21 pm
Hello,
I have seen these insects twice in my apartment in suburbia lately. One much smaller than this, about a centimeter long, and then this one, which was about 3 centimeters in length.
Sorry the photo is slightly blurry, but I hope you can see the shape. I know it’s not a roach, the back isn’t the right shape. I don’t think it’s a beetle. I am perplexed outside of that though: it has these thickenings near its joints in its legs that remind me of bees, and a head that reminds me of that, too, but it doesn’t have the hemiptera waist. My best guess is a true bug, but that’s pretty vague!
I tried to grab it so I could look at its mouth parts, but it intelligently moved away.
Signature: Sylvia

Long Necked Seed Bug

Long Necked Seed Bug

Dear Sylvia,
This is a Long Necked Seed Bug,
Myodocha serripes, a species that according to BugGuide:  “overwinters in woodlands, migrating to fields in spring/summer; adults attracted to lights” and “Sometimes a pest of strawberries.”  We love your dedication to learning its identity, including trying to see its mouth parts. 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Busy milkweeds
Location: Columbus, Ohio
July 12, 2016 1:04 pm
So the milkweeds seem to be the water cooler of the insect world. We have monarchs, Japanese beetles, tons of bees (honey and bumbles), and these red mating things! Their flowers are a pretty color and they really have a pleasant and strong scent. I’m rather surprised that these weren’t grown on purpose before the whole monarch decline. Any way, were enjoying the show and hope to get a caterpillar or two.
Signature: Amber

Mating Large Milkweed Bugs

Mating Large Milkweed Bugs

Dear Amber,
There is indeed quite a robust ecosystem surrounding milkweed, which is one of the reasons we created a Milkweed Meadow tag on our site recently.  Monarch Butterflies need milkweed as it is the only food consumed by the Monarch Caterpillars.  Milkweed Borers and Milkweed Tussock Moth Caterpillars are other visitors you might expect in the future.  Your mating Large Milkweed Bugs are another species that depends upon milkweed.  Many pollinators like your Bumble Bees, numerous species of butterflies and many wasps including Tarantula Hawks (mostly in western states), while not dependent upon milkweed as a sole food, are attracted to the fragrant blooms that are laden with nectar.  We will attempt to identify your Bumble Bee species.  

Bumble Bees

Bumble Bees

Bumble Bee

Bumble Bee

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bug invasion!
Location: Los Altos CA
June 27, 2016 5:42 pm
Hi bugman! I’m having a bit of a freak out here in Northern California (Los Altos), and hope you can help. There has been a sudden appearance of a large number of tiny black and tan bugs at my house. They seem to come from the foundation of the stucco house and swarm the walls and windows, and stream in through cracks in doors and windows! They show up in the late afternoon when it gets warm, and there are thousands and thousands of them, and then they disappear as it cools down in the evening. They don’t seem to fly, rather scurry along very quickly and seem to fall down from the wall if scared. They appear en masse on one wall one day and then will be greatly diminished in a day, but then appear along another wall a day or two later. We have had a drought here, so the ground is not damp, and they don’t look like the pictures of fungus-eating springtails I saw online. What could they be and what should I do to stop the invasion? Thank you so much for any guidance!
Signature: Disturbed by the force

Oh, I forgot to tell you about the size…they are tiny! Some are small like the size of a flea, and some are barely visible like the size of pepper. They also don’t fly, and don’t seem to bite, although I haven’t really given them a chance to try.
Thank you again!

Probably Dirt Colored Seed Bugs

Probably Dirt Colored Seed Bugs

Dear Disturbed by the force,
Your insects look identical to the ones in this two year old posting from Northern California that we identified as potentially Dirt Colored Seed Bugs in the family Rhyparochromidae. 

Probably Dirt Colored Seed Bugs

Probably Dirt Colored Seed Bugs

Hi Daniel,
Thank you very much for your help! Still quite disturbing to see those tiny dirt-colored seed bugs everywhere, but I am so glad to know what they are. I can now research them by name and see the best way to get rid of them.
Thank you again,
Elise

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Black and Orange bugs that seem to attach together at back end
Location: Henderson, NV
June 15, 2016 8:53 am
Hi! I’m a new homeowner and found these bugs recently. They are normally single, but they will occasionally come together at their backside and even move in unison when I approach them. Do you know what I’m dealing with here? Thanks!
Signature: New Homeowner

Mating Small Milkweed Bugs

Mating Small Milkweed Bugs

Dear New Homeowner,
These are mating Small Milkweed Bugs, and they pose no threat to your new home.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: BUG ID
Location: Portland, oregon
June 4, 2016 1:47 pm
Hi my name is Dez, I’m almost six. We are helping with research about pollinators and are trying to find out more about them so we can keep helping them. I’m also making a blog post about them.
We saw this bug here in Portland, Oregon and can’t identify it from anything we found online. Could you help?
Thanks very much,
Signature: Dez

Small Milkweed Bug

Small Milkweed Bug

Dear Dez,
We are pleased to hear about your concern with pollinators, and it is wonderful that you will be blogging about what you learn.  This is a Small Milkweed Bug,
Lygaeus kalmii, a species that is generally found not far from its host plant, Milkweed.  According to BugGuide citing another article:  “Adults suck nectar from flowers of various herbaceous plants, and also feed on milkweed seeds(?). Also reported to be scavengers and predators, especially in spring when milkweed seeds are scarce. They have been reported feeding on honey bees, monarch caterpillars and pupae, and dogbane beetles, among others.”

Thank you so much for telling us what this bug is called and some of its features! I was so excited to get such a fast response!
Dez

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Unfamiliar True Bug
Location: Chula Vista, California
May 24, 2016 6:02 pm
Hello! First I would like to say I do love this website very much and I frequently visit it for some fun! Now on to my question; in my area there are hundreds upon hundreds of Red Shouldered Bugs running around. But just today (5/24/16), I have noticed a strange dead bug that was obviously a true bug but was not one of those very common Red Shouldered Bugs while I was walking my dog. I didn’t think about it much until I got back home and then I saw a living one in my backyard. It was about 1/2 and inch longer than an adult Red Shouldered Bug with a different pattern. I think it’s some kind of parasitic bug but what I’m hoping is that it is an assassin bug (I want to catch one so I can feed it a bunch of spiders in my house). Please identify this bug.
Signature: Stugy

Large Milkweed Bug

Large Milkweed Bug

Dear Stugy,
The Large Milkweed Bug,
Oncopeltus fasciatus, is generally found in association with Milkweed, a plant that supports a diverse insect ecosystem.  Large Milkweed Bugs have been reported to our site in association with Oleander, a common landscape and freeway plant with toxic tendencies.  See BugGuide for species verification.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination