Currently viewing the category: "Seed Bugs"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this bug
Location: Southern California
July 27, 2014 3:10 pm
We see this but a lot in our garden here in San Marino California., which is right next to Pasadena, CA. We would love to know what it is. Thank you!
Signature: Mirta

Large Milkweed Bug

Large Milkweed Bug

Dear Mirta,
We suspect you must have milkweed in your garden.  This is a Large Milkweed Bug,
Oncopeltus fasciatus, and it will feed on the seeds of milkweed, but otherwise does not harm the plant.  See BugGuide for more information on the Large Milkweed Bug.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: everywhere
Location: Lewiston Idaho hot dry low elevation pacific northwest
July 8, 2014 6:37 pm
These little tiny beetle shaped insects fly all over they just came out of every crevasse of the house they are dark brown and there are tons they are like termites in basically but I’m not sure I don’t think it is a type of termite please help
Signature: they’re everywhere

Elm Seed Bug

Elm Seed Bug

Dear t.e.,
Last year we posted a letter, also from Idaho, regarding an infestation of Elm Seed Bugs,
Arocatus melanocephalus, and since that time, we have received many comments.  ABC News reported on this dilemma a year earlier in July 2012.  Boise local KTVB News also reported on this infestation last July.  This is an invasive species introduced from Europe, and until a natural predator is discovered, we suspect they will continue to spread in North America.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What Is This May I Ask?
Location: Arkansas, USA
June 5, 2014 3:24 am
Found several of these around the edge of the vanity sink. Some of they have even crawled into my towels. Can you help me identify what this bug is?
Signature: Lee

Long Necked Seed Bug

Long Necked Seed Bug

Hi Lee,
This looks like a Long Necked Seed Bug,
Myodocha serripes, but we cannot tell you why it has entered the home.  Though they hibernate, this is the wrong season to find them indoors.  There is more information available on BugGuide.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Neacoryphus lateralis?
Location: Santa Fe, NM
May 3, 2014 1:08 pm
I was walking around Santa Fe, NM yesterday and somehow ended up with this guy tangled in my hair! My sister extricated it and identified it as some sort of benign seed bug, so we released it nearby after taking some pictures. It looks to me like the Neacoryphus lateralis specimens in your site’s seed bug files. I don’t remember seeing any other individuals in the area, though–just this one!
Signature: Cat

Seed Bug:  Melacoryphus lateralis

Seed Bug: Melacoryphus lateralis

Dear Cat,
We are in total agreement with your identification, but in the interest of modern taxonomy, we need to make a correction.  The genus for this Seed Bug is now listed on BugGuide as being
Melacoryphus lateralis, and there is a note:  “Orig. Comb: Neacoryphus lateralis Dallas, 1852″ which implies genus lumping.

Seed Bug:  Melacoryphus lateralis

Seed Bug: Melacoryphus lateralis

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Thousands of these tiny bugs in my garden
Location: Tempe, AZ
April 30, 2014 7:30 pm
Hello,
I have a permaculture garden in the front yard. Mostly covered in wood chips and compost.
I live in Tempe, Arizona. This evening, I saw thousands of these critters crawling among the rocks, concrete patio and among my sweet alyssum plants.
I have a lot of kale in the yard, one watermelon patch, some cucumber, zucchini, and lots of nasturtium among other edible plants.
Not sure what they are. I don’t normally bother with garden pest because I do organic gardening to avoid killing bees and pollinators.
But the shear number of these bugs scared me a little bit.
Please help me identify.
They are tiny, the largest ones I could find is about 2mm. Attached is photo of the larger one and a group of the smaller ones, that were about 1mm.
These were taken with point and shoot camera and cropped really tight to show the insects.
Signature: Yes

Immature Dirt Colored Seed Bug

Immature False Chinch Bug

A few days ago, we posted an image, also from Arizona, of a very similar immature Heteropteran that we tentatively identified as a Dirt Colored Seed Bug in the family Rhyparochromidae.  It can be very difficult to ascertain a proper identification based on an immature specimen.  Perhaps we will soon learn a proper identification if there is a statewide outbreak of these numerous nymphs.

Immature Dirt Colored Seed Bugs

Immature False Chinch Bugs

Dear Daniel,
Thank you so much for writing back.
After hours of looking through Google. I came to what is the closet to all the different stages of the bug that is in my photo.
False Chinch Bugs
http://www.ext.colostate.edu/pubs/insect/05603.html
Looks like my photos match exactly the different stages of the photo they have on the site “Figure 2. False chinch bug adults and nymphs.”
I also posted a lot more photos I took here:
http://www.phoenixpermaculture.org/forum/topics/i-have-a-huge-amount-of-crawlers-in-the-yard
What do you think?
Thank you.
Sincerely,
Jacq Davis

Hi Jacq,
We believe your False Chinch Bug identification might be correct.  Nymphs can be very difficult to properly identify.  According to BugGuide:  “3 (or more) species are introduced N. caledoniae, huttoni, vinitor” which supports our believe that this might be an invasive exotic species.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: tiny bugs on outside walls of house
Location: Phoenix AZ
April 28, 2014 3:22 pm
we just noticed these buggers on our outside walls. they don’t appear to fly; when i touch the wall near one, it falls,. the photo is of a bougainvillea petal floating in our pool, with what (i think?) appears to be a queen! either that, or something wanting to eat them all. please help, so we know what to do, if you can. they are getting inside one window which doesn’t seal properly and a parakeet lives near that window! thank you!!
Signature: suzy

Possibly Immature Dirt Colored Seed Bugs and Syrphid Fly

Possibly Immature False Chinch Bugs and Frit Fly

Dear Suzy,
These immature Heteropterans look remarkably like some still unidentified, possibly Dirt Colored Seed Bugs we posted from Montana in 2012.  The Fly may be a Syrphid Fly, a family that has many species with larvae that feed on Aphids, members of the same insect order as your True Bugs.  We will try to get Eric Eaton’s opinion on this identification.

Eric Eaton Responds
Daniel:
Wow, immatures are really hard.  I suspect something in the “Lygaeoidea” like you do, but….Fly might be a Chloropidae [Ed. Note:  See BugGuide].  This whole image looks like something out of a sweep net sample through a grassland.
Eric

Ed. Note:  May 2, 2014
We posted some images of a very similar Heteropteran nymph that might be a False Chinch Bug,
Nysius raphanus, and the same is likely true for this posting.  According to Colorado State University Extension:  “Mass migrations of false chinch bugs in the vicinity of buildings are primarily associated with very hot, dry weather. This may force the insects to move from drying weed hosts to seek shelter and higher humidity. Migrations indoors may occur through openings and cause nuisance problems. However, false chinch bugs do not bite, do not feed nor damage anything indoors, and will ultimately die out if trapped inside.  Irrigated landscapes adjacent to buildings may further encourage false chinch bug migrations to these areas. Therefore it may be desirable to temporarily discontinue watering in the immediate vicinity of the building when a problem migration is in progress. Providing cool, humid areas at some distance may encourage the insects to move away more rapidly.”  According to BugGuide:  “3 (or more) species are introduced N. caledoniae, huttoni, vinitor” which supports our believe that this might be an invasive exotic species.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination