Currently viewing the category: "Seed Bugs"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: pool invaders
Location: San Diego California 92117
April 27, 2016 4:03 pm
These abundant lil bugs showed up in our pool yesterday. What are they?
Signature: swarmed swimmer

Seed Bugs, we believe

Seed Bugs, we believe

Dear swarmed swimmer,
We are not able to provide a definitive species identification at this time, but in our opinion these are either Seed Bugs in the family Lygaeidae (see BugGuide) or Dirt Colored Seed Bugs in the family Rhyparochromidae (also see BugGuide).  There are species in both families that periodically have tremendous population explosions when conditions are right.  They look very much like the Seed Bugs that infested Burning Man that are profiled on Gizmodo.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: red & black bug
Location: Western Washington State
April 18, 2016 12:25 pm
Hi Mr. Bugman,
I took this photo on my deck last night. There were 20-30 of these red and black bugs all over my Lamb’s ear plant. I live in the Western slopes of the Cascade Mountains in Washington state and have never seen this particuler bug before.
Can you ID it?
Signature: Machele Brodie

Whitecrossed Seed Bug

Whitecrossed Seed Bug

Dear Machele,
This Whitecrossed Seed Bug,
Neacoryphus bicrucis, according to BugGuide, is found in “Fields, meadows; adults come to light.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Help! tons of these things appeared 2 days ago
Location: Phoenix, Az
April 12, 2016 8:30 pm
I live in Phoenix Az. I do have a front yard garden of some herbs, tomatoes, and artichokes. I don’t think the bugs are there for the garden. They spread out through the dirt portion of the yard and have trails (4-5 trails that they’re following) all the way past the garden and into the backyard.
I found false cinch bugs have similar body shape, but not the markings. Our neighbor is redoing his entire house, so I’m wondering if that’s where they came from?
Signature: Morgan

Possibly California False Chinch Bug Nymph

Possibly California False Chinch Bug Nymph

Dear Morgan,
Last spring we posted an image of similar looking nymphs, and at that time we wrote:  “These are immature True Bugs, and nymphs can be very difficult to identify.  …  we suspect you may also have Dirt Colored Seed Bugs in the family Rhyparochromidae.”  When we received images of the adults, we tentatively identified them as California False Chinch Bugs,
Xyonysius californicus, but alas BugGuide does not have any young nymph images.

Thank you! That gives me enough info so I don’t have to worry about them. I really appreciate he quick reply.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Boxelder Relative?
Location: Snohomish, WA
March 30, 2016 4:18 pm
We have numerous of these on our south facing exterior walls. The closest images I have found that look like these are the Boxelder, although ours do not have the reddish-orange coloring. I always attempt to let nature police itself the best I can. (Paper wasps in outdoor light fixture annually, which my wife hates.) We have many jumping spiders that patrol the same south facing walls, but I haven’t seen any of these little beetles fall prey to them yet. Hopefully, these are not an infestation that needs to be addressed. Thank you for your time!
Signature: CEROE

Mediterranean Seed Bug

Mediterranean Seed Bug

Dear CEROE,
We believe this is a Mediterranean Seed Bug,
Xanthochilus saturnius, a species that according to BugGuide is:  “native to Europe and the Mediterranean, adventive in NA (WA-CA) and now locally abundant.”  According to the Pacific Northwest Insect Management Handbook:  ” There is very little known about these bugs, possibly because they are not major economic pests. They do cause anxiety among homeowners, and costly eradication expenses.”  The PNIM Handbook also states:  “Even though they do no damage to house, humans, or pets, these seed bugs become a huge annoyance and costly to exterminate when they migrate into households.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Milkweed bug
Location: Richmond, VA
March 24, 2016 1:28 am
Hello bug man!
I would like to know if these bugs are milkweed bugs or kissing bugs or neither! I spend a lot of time in my garden and saw these guys hanging out. Want to make sure they can’t seriously harm me. Thanks so much for your help.
Signature: Nai ford

Large Milkweed Bugs

Large Milkweed Bugs

Dear Nai,
Your image depicts a group of Large Milkweed Bugs,
Oncopeltus fasciatus, both winged adults and wingless nymphs.  They are harmless.

Awesome!! Thanx for responding so quickly. Very kind of u. Take care.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Fat orange juvenile(?) insect.
Location: Walnut Creek CA open space near pond.
February 29, 2016 7:06 pm
I found the group of orange insects with black spots near water last August, in the Walnut Creek Open Space, California. Later I found an earlier picture of a what must be a close relative of this bug in my files. I don’t know where I found it. That one does not have the spots.
I hope you can tell me what these critters are.
Signature: Dirk Muehlner

Large Milkweed Bug Nymphs

Large Milkweed Bug Nymphs

Dear Dirk,
We wish you had not cropped your image.  These sure look like Large Milkweed Bug nymphs,
Oncopeltus fasciatus, based on this BugGuide image, and they do appear to be feeding on milkweed pods, but we would love to see more of the plant to try to identify the species of milkweed.  The image you captured earlier is also a True Bug in the suborder Heteroptera, but from there the taxonomies diverge.  The Large Milkweed Bugs are Seed Bugs in the family Lygaeidae and the other is a solitary Western Boxelder Bug nymph, Boisea rubrolineata, in the Scentless Plant Bug family Rhopalidae which you can verify on BugGuide

Western Boxelder Bug Nymph

Western Boxelder Bug Nymph

Update:  March 7, 2016
Hi Daniel
Thank you for identifying these Large Milkweed Bug larvae!  You regretted that my image was cropped and I found a less cropped version, for what it’s worth.

Large Milkweed Bugs (juvenile)

Large Milkweed Bugs (juvenile)

Thanks again.   I really appreciate your response to my query.
Dirk

Wow Dirk,
We are so excited to get an image that includes the narrow leaf milkweed seed pods and the leaf is also visible.  Las Pilitas Nursery has more wonderful information on the California Narrow Leaf Milkweed, a critical plant in a vibrant ecosystem that we profile in Milkweed Meadow.

Narrow Leaf Milkweed with Large Milkweed Bug nymphs

Narrow Leaf Milkweed with Large Milkweed Bug nymphs

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination