Currently viewing the category: "Seed Bugs"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bug identification
Location: Raleigh, NC
January 9, 2016 2:36 pm
Do you know what this is? Crawled out of my bicycle handle bars in NC, Jan 2016
Signature: Snt

Whitecrossed Seed Bug

Whitecrossed Seed Bug

Dear Snt,
This is the third image of a Whitecrossed Seed Bug,
Neacoryphus bicrucis, we have posted since the New Year, and it is quite interesting that they are not at all localized, with the previous two postings originating in Oregon and New York.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What’s this bug?
Location: New York, NY
December 28, 2015 6:44 am
I live in Jamaic Queens, NY and found this on the inside of my screen.
Signature: Not necessary

Whitecrossed Seed Bug

Whitecrossed Seed Bug

This is a harmless Whitecrossed Seed Bug.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is it?
Location: Brookings OR
January 3, 2016 3:16 pm
Haven’t seen this bug before.
Signature: John Boye

Whitecrossed Seed Bug

Whitecrossed Seed Bug

Dear John,
The color and markings on this Whitecrossed Seed Bug,
Neacoryphus bicrucis, are quite distinctive.  According to BugGuide, they are found in “Fields, meadows; adults come to light.”

Dan,
Many thanks for taking the time to reply! I’ll look for more info on him via the web.
Best Regards,
John Boye

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Is this bug a “kissing bug”
Location: Albuquerque, NM
November 26, 2015 10:24 am
My daughter was playing with this bug, and I think may have a bite from it. I saw there is a CDC warning about kissing bugs, and wasnt sure if this was a kissing bug or not?
Signature: Lynn Foreman

Mating Small Milkweed Bugs

Mating Small Milkweed Bugs

Dear Lynn,
Though your image pictures them in an amorous position, these are mating Small Milkweed Bugs, not Kissing Bugs.  The images of the dead insect are also of a Small Milkweed Bug.

Thank you so much, that’s a big relief to me! Thank you for what you do!

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What Beetle is this
Location: Cooma NSW Australia
October 11, 2015 5:08 pm
Hi
I found these beetles eating on all the buds of a plant in my garden this morning. I live in Cooma NSW (Snowy Mountains region). Hoping you can help.
Signature: Diedre Rees

Mating Seed Bugs

Mating Harlequin Bugs

Dear Diedre,
These are mating Seed Bugs in the family Lygaeidae, but we have not had any luck identifying their species.  We did find a matching image on My Australian Insects, but alas, it is unidentified there as well.  Perhaps one of our readers can steer us to a link with an identity.

Update:  Harlequin Bugs, Dindymus versicolor
Thanks to a comment from Matthew, we are able to provide some links to the Harlequin Bug.  According to the Atlas of Living Australia:  “Harlequin Bugs usually cluster in large numbers on fences, walls, wood heaps and tree trunks. Mating pairs face opposite directions, joined at the end of the abdomens; the larger female usually dictates the direction of movement. They feed on a variety of weeds and plants, often damaging fruits and vegetables.”  According to the blog, A Year in a Gippsland Garden:  “For anyone looking at these little bugs in the garden and wondering if they are a potential problem or not the answer is a resounding ‘Yes!’  The Harlequin bug does not take great big obvious bites out of anything, it hides and sucks the life out tender stems (and fruit). Look for stem damage and wilting flower buds and fruit. In my garden I have observed them in greatest numbers on Callistemon, Australian native hibiscus, nasturtium, tomatoes, and hollyhocks. They have also been in numbers on sweetcorn, sunflowers, sage and roses.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bright orange bug
Location: Tempe, Arizona
October 10, 2015 5:01 pm
So this outside near the pool
Signature: Alison

Mating Small Milkweed Bugs

Mating Small Milkweed Bugs

Dear Alison,
These are mating Small Milkweed Bugs,
Lygaeus kalmii, a species that will not do any harm to your garden, though they may reduce the number of milkweed plants that sprout from seeds.  According to BugGuide citing The Life of a Californian Population of the Facultative Milkweed Bug Lygaeus kalmii:  “Adults suck nectar from flowers of various herbaceous plants, and also feed on milkweed seeds(?). Also reported to be scavengers and predators, especially in spring when milkweed seeds are scarce. They have been reported feeding on honey bees, monarch caterpillars and pupae, and dogbane beetles, among others.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination