Currently viewing the category: "Seed Bugs"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Black and Red with White Spots
Location: 92595 [Wildomar, California]
April 19, 2014 4:11 pm
I just found this in my backyard and want to know if he will be bad for my vegetables, grapes and fruit trees. I’ve narrowed it down to either a Milkweed Bug or a Box Elder Bug… but don’t know.
Signature: Joseph Morabito

Small Milkweed Bug

Small Milkweed Bug

Dear Joseph,
You did a very good job of narrowing this identification to two similar looking species.  This is actually a Small Milkweed Bug,
Lygaeus kalmii, and we do not believe it will cause any significant problems in your garden.  Citations on BugGuide include:  “Adults suck nectar from flowers of various herbaceous plants, and also feed on milkweed seeds(?). Also reported to be scavengers and predators, especially in spring when milkweed seeds are scarce. They have been reported feeding on honey bees, monarch caterpillars and pupae, and dogbane beetles, among others. The Life of a Californian Population of the Facultative Milkweed Bug Lygaeus kalmii.  Adults mainly feed on milkweed seeds, but they often consume nectar from various flowers. Harvard Entomology.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Insect Project
Location: Capecod
January 12, 2014 3:39 pm
Please identify this bug for me as it is a Insect project for school.
Signature: Seana

Large Milkweed Bug

Large Milkweed Bug

Hi Seana,
This is a Large Milkweed Bug,
Oncopeltus fasciatus.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Please help
Location: Anza, CA
December 28, 2013 9:12 pm
I found these guys in my home. I have lived here for ten years and have never seen them before. I have taken an insect identification class before, but I am not experienced enough to figure this out. It looks like a Hemiptera of some sort. It’s about a millimeter long and it is pretty difficult to get a picture of it. It’s winter here in Southern California, and I am in the high desert. Could you please help? I don’t think it is the brown marmorated stink bug because it doesn’t have true bug characteristics and there’s no odor. I suspect it is coming in through a crack somewhere for warmth, but who knows what it is. I don’t think it is butting me or my animals because it doesn’t have apparent piercing/sucking mouthparts. Please help.
Signature: Cass

Dirt Colored Seed Bug nymph, perhaps

Dirt Colored Seed Bug nymph, perhaps

Dear Cass,
Though your photo is blurry, your immature Hemipteran closely resembles the bugs in this photo from our archives that we tentatively identified as Dirt Colored Seed Bug nymphs, though there is some question that they might be Chinch Bug nymphs.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Help! Bug Showed Up.
Location: Bend Oregon
October 6, 2013 2:21 pm
Can you help me identify what this bug is. I just showed up and there are hundreds of them on my front porch. They don’t bite but are a bother.
Signature: Jason

Dirt Colored Seed Bug:  Rhyparochromus vulgaris

Dirt Colored Seed Bug: Rhyparochromus vulgaris

Hi Jason,
Whenever a person is suddenly troubled with large numbers of small insects that we don’t recognize, we suspect an invasive, exotic species, and in your instance, our instincts were correct.  This is a Dirt Colored Seed Bug,
Rhyparochromus vulgaris, and it is a relatively recent introduction to the Pacific Northwest.  According to BugGuide, it is:  “native to Europe, recently introduced to NA (Seattle, WA area)” and “earliest NA record: WA 2001; since 2003, large congregations have been reported in nw. WA; expected to spread to BC.”  BugGuide also mentions that these Dirt Colored Seed Bugs are found:  “on the ground and on tree trunks; tends to congregate around buildings late in the season seeking shelter.”  The government shutdown has negatively impacted our ability to link to any information provided by the Department of Agriculture (USDA) as they are deemed not essential at this time.  British Bugs has some information, including:  “The London records are from dry grasslands; this species seems much more of a generalist than R. pini, which is mainly found on heathland in the south-east.  Adults overwinter, mating in the spring. The new generation is complete from late July onwards.”  Now we are wondering if the Dirt Colored Seed Bug nymphs from Montana we posted some time back might be  Rhyparochromus vulgaris.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this bug? a beetle? some kind of wasp moth?
Location: Debary FLorida
September 30, 2013 5:51 pm
HI! I am going nuts trying to find what that bug is…I took a picture of at the Gemini Springs park in Debary Florida.
Signature: Bugging

Large Milkweed Bug

Large Milkweed Bug

This is a magnificent photo of a Large Milkweed Bug, Oncopeltus fasciatus, preparing for flight.  When resting, the wings cover the abdomen.  Large Milkweed Bugs are True Bugs in the Seed Bug family.  We did find a photo on BugGuide that is similar, but not as nice as your photo.

Thank you kindly for finding about this bug and for the compliment about the photo. I love nature and I may have to pick your brain again soon!
Eric

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Large Milkweed Bugs Kissing?
Location: Hawthorne, CA
September 9, 2013 12:41 pm
Hi Daniel,
Here are two Milkweed Bugs that look as though they are kissing. Below them is a nymph. Are they kissing, protecting the nymph from my prying lens, or something altogether different? They sat like this for quite some time.
Signature: Thanks, Anna Carreon

Large Milkweed Bugs

Large Milkweed Bugs

Hi Anna,
We have no idea what these Large Milkweed Bugs are doing, but it is still a very lovely and interesting photo.  Perhaps one of our readers will know what is going on.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination