Currently viewing the category: "Red Bugs"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Soapberry bugs
Location: Pretoria, South Africa
August 25, 2014 10:06 am
here’s the pictures of the bugs I found on the trunks of these trees. Some people have them in their gardens too, but I’ve never seen them anywhere else. This picture was taken at the start of the winter.
Signature: Cindy

Cotton Stainer Aggregation

Cotton Stainer Aggregation

Dear Cindy,
We disagree with your identification.  We do not believe these are Soapberry Bugs in the subfamily Serinethinae, but rather Cotton Stainers  or Red Bugs in the family Pyrrhocoridae.  There are some similar looking images of Cotton Stainers in the genus
Dysdercus on ISpot and there is an image on FlickR identified as Dysdercus nigrofasciatus.  This note is also posted on ISpot:  “D. nigrofasciatus and D. fasciatus are not synonyms. There are four species of Dysdercus occurring in South Africa: fasciatus, nigrofasciatus, intermedius and superstitiosus. the first three looks superficially similar, but there are clear differences, for example: the head of fasciatus is significantly longer than the head of nigrofasciatus, etc.”  We are confident that the genus Dysdercus is correct, but we are uncertain of the species.

Cotton Stainer Aggregation

Cotton Stainer Aggregation

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bugs behaviour
Location: Moscow, Russia
June 24, 2014 12:50 am
Dear What’s That Bug team,
Why those bugs are gathering into groups? there were quite a few of those groups.
Kind regards
Signature: Slava Smirnov

Firebugs

Firebugs

Dear Slava,
These are Firebugs,
Pyrrhocoris apterus, and they are known for forming large aggregations containing both immature nymphs and adults.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Katydid Question
Location: Tortola, British Virgin Islands
March 2, 2014 6:23 pm
Hey,
Just have a few bug questions. Wondering what these are, theres a katydid, a spider and a pile of these cool red beetles. Common name and genuis-species would be nice too if possible. Thanks!
Signature: Charlie

St. Andrew's Cotton Stainers

St. Andrew’s Cotton Stainers

Dear Charlie,
We were surprised that we received two identification requests from the British Virgin Islands on the same day, and we can’t help but to wonder if there was some local publicity that led you to our site.  For the purposes of organizing our archives, we like for each posting to contain a single species, or if there are multiple species, for them to be classified similarly.  For that reason we are only posting your “cool red beetles” which are actually St. Andrew’s Cotton Stainers,
Dysdercus andreae, a species of Red Bug in the family Pyrrhocoridae and classified as True Bugs and not Beetles.  There are several mating pairs evident in your photo.  See BugGuide for verification of our identification.  Please resend your other identification requests individually using our standard submission form by clicking the Ask What’s That Bug? link and please provide any important background information on the sightings.

St. Andrew's Cotton Stainers

St. Andrew’s Cotton Stainers

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Greetings from Nepal
Location:  Chitwan National Park, Nepal
January 23, 2014 7:39 pm
Bugman, my daughter Kryss Castle and I are at Machan Paradise Resort
in Chitwan National Park. Today on an early morning jungle walk we found a Red Cotton Bug. By the way, we also saw a one-horned Rhino just 30 feet away. But we know where your heart lies!
Allison Jones

Red Cotton Bug

Red Cotton Bug nymph

Dear Allison,
Thanks so much for submitting your lovely photograph.  We researched Red Cotton Bug and discovered a photo on the Marc Anderson PHotography site, further identified as
 Dysdercus cingulatus, that was also taken in Chitwan National Park, Nepal, but we don’t believe that identification is entirely correct based on the images also identified as Dysdercus cingulatus on Csiro.  We do believe your bug is also in the Red Bug or Stainer Family Pyrrhocoridae along with Dysdercus cingulatus, which is substantiated by the photo of your bug entitled “Infested” by Joe Hastings on FlickR.  Continued research led us to a Red Cotton Bug on FlickR identified as Dysdercus koenigii, also from Chitwan National Park, Nepal and posted by Patrick.  We found additional examples of Dysdercus koenigii on PBase and called a Red Cotton Bug or a Silk Cotton Bug.  The Krishisewa Agriculture Information Hub of okra pests pictures an adult and nymph Red Cotton Bug, Dysdercus koenigii, and indicates:  “Life-history: The eggs are laid in clusters of 80-100 in cracks of the soil or dry leaves near the plants. The nymphs hatch out in about 7 days and become adults in 40-85 days.  The red coloured nymphs are marked by a row of 3 black spots in the middle of the abdomen and 3 white spots on either margin of it.  Damage: Both nymphs and adults suck the leaf and fruit sap. The plants become weak and stunted, the leaves and fruits may curl up.”  The black head on your individual does not appear on the nymph pictured on Krishisewa.  Project Noah calls a similar looking bug the Cotton Stainer Bug,  Dysdercus koenigii.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Red bugs
Location: Sardinal, Guanacaste, Costa Rica
January 21, 2014 12:52 pm
I’ve been trying to find the right name of this species. I found out that they are red bugs in different stages but what about the second picture with the pale ones? Are they adult of the same species? Thanks in advance.
Signature: Brigitte

Two Spotted Cotton Stainer

Two Spotted Cotton Stainers

Dear Brigitte,
We are very happy you provided two images because only one of the images includes winged adults and immature nymphs can be notoriously difficult to identify to the species level.  You actually correctly identified these Red Bugs in the family Pyrrhocoridae.  Bugs in this family frequently form aggregations like the one you documented.  We did a bit of searching, and we have matched the adult individuals in your photo to the Two Spotted Cotton Stainers,
Dysdercus bimaculatus, pictured on BugGuide.

Aggregation of Two Spotted Cotton Stainer nymphs

Aggregation of Two Spotted Cotton Stainer nymphs

Thanks, I really appreciate your help.  I’m a bird photographer and I practically know nothing about bugs.
Brigitte

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bug/Beetle from Costa Rica
Location: Central Costa Rica
January 13, 2014 8:37 pm
Dear Bugman,
can you ID this red-headed guy I photographed at night in Costa Rica? Thank you very much again!
Signature: Frank

Unknown Red Headed Bug

Unknown Red Headed Bug

Hi Frank,
Our initial attempts to identify this red headed True Bug did not prove successful, but it does remind us of a red headed Coreid Bug,
Hypselonotus atratus, that we just posted.  Perhaps one of our readers will have better luck with this one.

Karl Provides an identification
Hi Daniel and Frank:
Coreid bugs nearly always have prominent ocelli, the simple eyes on the top of the head, and much denser wing venation. This is actually a Cotton Stainer or Red Bug (Pyrrhocoridae: Pyrrhocorinae), probably Dysdercus obscuratus. The species has a very wide distribution (Texas to Peru) and is highly variable in appearance. Here is one more image posted on flickr.  Regards.  Karl

Thank you so much, Daniel! Please forward my thanks to Karl, if you have the time.
Best
Frank

just warning you Frank:  I will be away for a week and not posting.  Please don’t resume sending photos until January 22.  Your photos are quite beautiful.
Daniel

Thanks for the warning, Daniel! Have a good trip and you can count on getting more pictures from me after Jan. 22nd. You and your site are quite amazing!
Best
Frank

January 21, 2014
bring them on.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination