Currently viewing the category: "Plant Bugs"
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Subject: What are these
Location: Byron bay australia
November 12, 2014 11:24 pm
These guys are absolutely everywhere in my garden. What are they?
Signature: Rob

Immature Red Eyes Bugs

Immature Red Eyes Bugs

Dear Rob,
We believe we have identified this aggregation as a group of immature Red Eyes Bugs,
Leptocoris tagalicus, that includes one winged adult, the lowest individual in the image.  We matched your image to images posted on the Brisbane Insect website where it states:  “The bug can be found on different type of plants. From the reference information, bugs in genus Leptocoris are seed predators of plants in family Sapindaceae. They are also known as Soapberry Bugs. This bug is common in Brisbane garden and backyards. They feed on plant seeds. Usually they do not do noticeable harm to the host plant. “

Thanks Daniel, I think that’s the one.
Rob

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Subject: Is this an assassin bug?
Location: Big Bend of Texas, Chihuahuan Desert
July 27, 2014 6:08 am
Thanks for all you folks do! I’m hoping you can help me identify what bug has been invading my house for the past couple weeks. We live in the Chihuahuan Desert, on the southwest edge of Texas. We have lots of interesting bugs, including the kissing bug called the conenose which can carry the parasite T. cruzi (causes Chagas disease).
The small bug that has been “blooming” lately resembles the conenose, but the body shape isn’t quite right and the sides are solid red, instead of striped. I’m hoping you will be able to identify this bug — and I’m also hoping it isn’t an assassin bug! We have been sweeping them up and tossing them outside daily, but it feels like bailing out the ocean!
Signature: Sara

Red Shouldered Bug

Red Shouldered Bug

Hi Sara,
The Red Shouldered Bug,
Jadera haematoloma, is a Scentless Plant Bug in the family Rhopalidae, not an Assassin Bug, so you do not have to worry about bites.  Though they are benign, they do have the habit of entering homes, sometimes in great numbers.  According to BugGuide, they are also called Goldenrain Tree Bugs, and perhaps you have a tree in your garden that is attracting them.  BugGuide states:  “Adults and larvae tend to feed in groups, and favor developing seeds and fruits of their favored hosts, but will also suck sap from foliage, flowers, buds, or oozing stems. They feed on a variety of plants primarily in and related to the family Sapindaceae. Favorites include Balloonvine (Cardiospermum species) and Goldenrain Tree (Koelreuteria sp.), both in Sapindaceae, and they regularly use Soapberry (Sapindus sp.; Sapindaceae) and Maple/Boxelder (Acer sp.; Aceraceae). Additionally, reported on a variety of other plants, especially feeding on fruit, including Chinaberry (Melia azedarach; Meliaceae), Fig (Ficus spp.; Moraceae), Althaea (Malvaceae), Plum, Cherry, & Peach (Prunus sp.; Rosaceae), Apple (Malus sp.; Rosaceae), Grape (Vitis sp.; Vitaceae), Ash (Fraxinus sp.; Oleaceae), etc. Adults sometimes gather around human food leftovers and other smashed insects to feed as well.”

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Subject: What is this thing?
Location: Little Rock, AR
July 22, 2014 7:19 am
I found this in my back yard on a hollyhock while taking macro shots of bugs, and no one I know seems to know what it is. Legs of a cricket, body of a fly, wings of a wasp, head (and even mouth part) of any number of true bugs…we’re stumped.
Thanks so much! :)
Sincerely,
L.J.
Signature: L.J.

Scentless Plant Bug:  Niesthrea louisianica

Scentless Plant Bug: Niesthrea louisianica

Dear L.J.,
This is probably the finest image we have ever received of the Scentless Plant Bug,
Niesthrea louisianica, which does not have a common name.  According to BugGuide, it:  “Feeds on flower buds and seeds of plants in the Mallow family (Malvaceae), such as Hibiscus and Rose of Sharon.”

Daniel,
Thanks again!  We’re glad to have the mystery solved. :)
I have other bugs from all over my back yard I can’t identify, either, and some that I just can’t figure out the variety, if it’s okay to share them. Not because I want to show off the pictures, of course (though I certainly appreciate the compliment on the last one), but to see if y’all can tell me what they are.  I understand if you’re short on time, though. :)
Sincerely,
L.J.

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Subject: bug party
Location: grand rapids michigan
June 24, 2014 3:54 pm
Found several piles like this today, sitting right out in the open. Any idea what they are? At the least they make for interesting photos.
Signature: dave

Aggregation of Eastern Boxelder Bugs

Aggregation of Eastern Boxelder Bugs

Hi Dave,
This is an aggregation of Eastern Boxelder Bugs, also known as Democrat Bugs.  Your image depicts various instars or stages of growth in immature nymphs.  Adults and nymphs will congregate together in very large masses.  Eastern Boxelder Bugs are considered benign, though they have been know to enter homes to hibernate, making pests of themselves.

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Subject: Singapore insect
Location: Singapore
June 4, 2014 9:24 am
Hi Daniel
Was wondering if your expertise could point me in the right direction to ID this guy. I wasn’t sure what to put in the subject. I found it on the bark of a tree in rainforest habitat. It’s quite small about 15mm in length.
Thanks,
Signature: David

What's That Bug???

What’s That Bug???  A Jumping Tree Bug

Dear David,
This really is a disorienting image.  We are nearly certain this is a True Bug in the suborder Heteroptera, but it has some very distinctive features, including huge eyes that are almost fly-like and antennae that almost seem to come from the bottom of the head.  We are going to need some assistance with this identification.  It seems to resemble a Backswimmer like this image on BugGuide, but it does not look aquatic.

Daniel:
Wow!  Definitely a plant bug in the family Miridae.  There are some really strange ones.  The family is so large and diverse that I cannot begin to even assign a subfamily to this one.
Eric

It is almost like it can turn its head 180º.

Update:  Jumping Tree Bug
Based on comments received yesterday, the consensus is that this is a Jumping Tree Bug in the Plant Bug subfamily Isometopinae, and this image from BugGuide supports that consensus.

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Subject: green and brown, active bug
Location: Sierra Foothils 2000′ elevation, Weimar, CA
May 25, 2014 4:45 pm
This was flitting about my garden, and landed on me. Could it be a type of assassin bug? Or is it a leaf eater? The first picture shows it may have a long green head part in front like as assassin bug. Its body is about 3/8 inch long.
Signature: Carolyn

Strawberry Bug

Strawberry Bug

Hi Carolyn,
We believe this is a Plant Bug in the family Miridae, and we also believe we have correctly identified it on BugGuide as
Closterotomus norvegicus, commonly called a Potato Bug (already an overused common name thanks to the iconic Potato Bug or Jerusalem Cricket) or Strawberry Bug.  According to BugGuide, the food plants include:  “alfalfa, white clover, and lotus seed crops in New Zealand; a key pest of pistachios in CA; also reported on nettle, poppy, thistle and other Asteraceae.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination