Currently viewing the category: "Plant Bugs"
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Subject: bug party
Location: grand rapids michigan
June 24, 2014 3:54 pm
Found several piles like this today, sitting right out in the open. Any idea what they are? At the least they make for interesting photos.
Signature: dave

Aggregation of Eastern Boxelder Bugs

Aggregation of Eastern Boxelder Bugs

Hi Dave,
This is an aggregation of Eastern Boxelder Bugs, also known as Democrat Bugs.  Your image depicts various instars or stages of growth in immature nymphs.  Adults and nymphs will congregate together in very large masses.  Eastern Boxelder Bugs are considered benign, though they have been know to enter homes to hibernate, making pests of themselves.

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Subject: Singapore insect
Location: Singapore
June 4, 2014 9:24 am
Hi Daniel
Was wondering if your expertise could point me in the right direction to ID this guy. I wasn’t sure what to put in the subject. I found it on the bark of a tree in rainforest habitat. It’s quite small about 15mm in length.
Thanks,
Signature: David

What's That Bug???

What’s That Bug???  A Jumping Tree Bug

Dear David,
This really is a disorienting image.  We are nearly certain this is a True Bug in the suborder Heteroptera, but it has some very distinctive features, including huge eyes that are almost fly-like and antennae that almost seem to come from the bottom of the head.  We are going to need some assistance with this identification.  It seems to resemble a Backswimmer like this image on BugGuide, but it does not look aquatic.

Daniel:
Wow!  Definitely a plant bug in the family Miridae.  There are some really strange ones.  The family is so large and diverse that I cannot begin to even assign a subfamily to this one.
Eric

It is almost like it can turn its head 180º.

Update:  Jumping Tree Bug
Based on comments received yesterday, the consensus is that this is a Jumping Tree Bug in the Plant Bug subfamily Isometopinae, and this image from BugGuide supports that consensus.

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Subject: green and brown, active bug
Location: Sierra Foothils 2000′ elevation, Weimar, CA
May 25, 2014 4:45 pm
This was flitting about my garden, and landed on me. Could it be a type of assassin bug? Or is it a leaf eater? The first picture shows it may have a long green head part in front like as assassin bug. Its body is about 3/8 inch long.
Signature: Carolyn

Strawberry Bug

Strawberry Bug

Hi Carolyn,
We believe this is a Plant Bug in the family Miridae, and we also believe we have correctly identified it on BugGuide as
Closterotomus norvegicus, commonly called a Potato Bug (already an overused common name thanks to the iconic Potato Bug or Jerusalem Cricket) or Strawberry Bug.  According to BugGuide, the food plants include:  “alfalfa, white clover, and lotus seed crops in New Zealand; a key pest of pistachios in CA; also reported on nettle, poppy, thistle and other Asteraceae.”

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Subject: Mating pair
Location: Singapore
May 18, 2014 3:01 am
Hi Daniel
I was wondering if you could help me with an ID for this mating pair. I found them in rainforest habitat on the trunk of a tree. They’d shuffle to the opposite side of the trunk when I approached them with my camera. They look like little mouse heads :-)
Thanks,
Signature: David

Mating Big Eyed Bugs, we believe

Mating Big Eyed Bugs, we believe

Hi David,
Our first thought is that these might be mating Big Eyed Bugs in the family Geocoridae, based on images posted to BugGuide of North American species.
  We will try to get a second opinion.  Do you by chance have an image that shows the antennae?  That can often be a helpful identification feature.  If we are correct, this is a new subcategory for our site.

Eric Eaton provides some input
Oh, lord, I have no idea.  Maybe Rhopalidae for family?  That is at best an educated guess.  I really don’t do well outside of North America for most things.
Eric

Hi Daniel
I’ve attached another photo (and Flickr link) of the same pair but from a slightly different angle. You can see the antennae a bit better on the left bug. Let me know if this helps with your identification.
https://www.flickr.com/photos/davegball/14181986096/
David.

Or perhaps Mating Scentless Plant Bugs

Or perhaps Mating Scentless Plant Bugs

Thanks David,
Eric Eaton suggested perhaps Scentless Plant Bugs in the family Rhopalidae.  Your Bugs are not represented on the Bugs & Insects of Singapore website, nor did we find them on ThaiBugs.

Thank you Daniel.
By the way you might want to bookmark this site below. It has IDs for a lot of South East Asia insects that you might encounter from whatsthatbug.com subscribers.
http://www.natureloveyou.sg/Minibeast.html

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Subject: Stuck-together butt bug
Location: San Marcos, CA
April 28, 2014 12:31 pm
Hi bugman,
I was taking a walk yesterday in San Marcos, CA (just north of San Diego) and found an odd bug. It looked like two bugs stuck together at their bums. Their bums were red (can’t really tell by the photo…sorry). I thought it might have been just two bugs stuck together but a few paces down the road I saw 2 more like this. It looks like one of the bodies is bigger and it moves in the forward direction that the bigger bodied bug would move. Hope this is enough helpful info to figure out what this is. Thanks!!
Signature: Chloe

Mating Red Shouldered Bugs

Mating Red Shouldered Bugs

Hi Chloe,
Adult Red Shouldered Bugs,
Jadera haematoloma, are frequently found in the mating position.

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Subject: Stink Bug Nymph … or something else?
Location: Paige, TX
April 21, 2014 1:31 pm
It’s spring in Texas, and that means two things are around the corner: blast furnace temperatures and stink bugs. I noticed some some small black and orange bugs on my onion plants about a week ago. They’re oval, and about 1/8″ wide by about 1/4″ long. They appear to be stink bugs nymphs. However, unlike those I’ve seen before, these are capable of flight. Can anyone help me to identify these critters?
Signature: Pyrrhyuloxia

Plant Bug, we believe

Plant Bug, we believe

Dear Pyrrhyuloxia,
This is not a Stink Bug, but we believe it is a member of the same suborder, Heteroptera, the True Bugs.  We believe this is a Plant Bug in the family Miridae, and a strong contender for the proper identification is
Metriorrhynchomiris dislocatus, though your images are soft and lacking in critical detail, so exact identification might not be possible.  According to BugGuide, this species of Plant Bug:  “has at least 15 color varieties. (Eric Eaton).”

I think you nailed it. Thanks!

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