Currently viewing the category: "True Bugs"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: flying bug id
Location: eugene, oregon.
October 4, 2014 2:33 pm
These things are everywhere here in Eugene Oregon. I thought it was a stink bug but they look bigger. I would like to know the name of the bug it is commonly known as.
Signature: jordan mccray

Brown Marmorated Stink Bug

Brown Marmorated Stink Bug

Dear Jordan,
The reason this insect looks like a Stink Bug to you is that it is a Stink Bug in the family Pentatomidae, however it is not a native species.  This is a Brown Marmorated Stink Bug,
Halyomorpha halys, a species from Asia first reported in Pennsylvania in 1998.  According to BugGuide:  “Severe Agricultural and Nuisance Problems: PA-VA (Leskey-USDA 2011)  Native to E. Asia, adventive in N. Amer., detected in 38 states (2) and spreading…” and “Highly polyphagous, reported on ~300 plant spp. in its native range (3);   feeds mostly on fruit, but also on leaves, stems, petioles, flowers, and seeds. Damage typically confined to the fruiting structures.”  Though we do not endorse extermination, we haven’t much tolerance for invasive species and we have no problem crushing invasive Brown Marmorated Stink Bugs that find their way into our garden and office.  In our opinion, the Brown Marmorated Stink Bug and the African Painted Bug, another Stink Bug, are two of the greatest threats to the agriculture industry that have been recently introduced to North America.  

Jennifer Smith, Tara Howard liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Squash Bug family?
Location: Bucerias, MX
September 30, 2014 2:11 pm
I’ve spent several hours online doing my due diligence before asking for help. Help!
Signature: Freda

Flag Footed Bug from Mexico

Flag Footed Bug from Mexico

Dear Freda,
This magnificent insect is a Flag Footed Bug,
Anisocelis flavolineata, and it is in the same family as the Squash Bugs, Coreidae.  Here is an image of a Flag Footed Bug on iNaturalist.  Your image is quite lovely, which is why we have decided to feature it as the Bug of the Month for October, 2014.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Nymph of Cadophila varia
Location: Crete/Greece/Iraklion
September 29, 2014 8:47 pm
I found this nymph on a fennel. I think it is a pentatomid possibly belongs to Cadophila varia
Signature: Nikos Roditakis

Stink Bug Nymph

Stink Bug Nymph

Dear Nikos,
Your nymph is a Pentatomid or Stink Bug, and upon researching images of
Cadophila varia on TrekNature, we did locate an image of an adult that looks very similar.  When we attempted to locate images of the nymph, your image popped up on both TrekNature and BugGuide.  We then located an image of a nymph on Biodiversidad Virtual, but it is black, not reddish orange, but that doesn’t mean there might be color variations within the species or that different instars might have different coloration.  We cannot say conclusively that your identification is correct, but it might be correct.

Rachel Carpenter liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Hong Kong Beauty bug
Location: Stanley, Hong Kong
September 25, 2014 3:58 pm
Hi
Recently moved to HK, and found this in my Hibiscus yesterday, 24 Sept. It is the tail end of summer, about 33C. About 1 inch long. We are quite close to the beach, although this bug appeared on a plant that I recently purchased and moved here from Kowloon. I have had the plant about 3 weeks.
Would love to know what it is, and if I should remove it to another plant to spare my garden. (There is a nearby undeveloped, jungley lot for the bug to emigrate to.)
Thanks
Signature: Margaret

Cotton Stainer

Cotton Stainer

Dear Margaret,
This is a Cotton Stainer or Red Bug in the family Pyrrhocoridae and we located a matching image on FlickR that is identified as 
Dysdercus cingulatus.  We then found a reference where it is called a Hong Kong Stink Bug and the information:  “Found mating and feeding on Ipomea on September 11, 2002 at Braemar Hill, North Point, and on Hibiscus.on August 10, 2003 at Pak Tam Chung, Sai Kung, Hong Kong SAR.”  The latter link is not very accurate as the family is listed incorrectly.  It is also pictured on iNaturalist.

Cotton Stainer

Cotton Stainer

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Moth Eating Bug ID
Location: Florida
September 24, 2014 6:28 am
I discovered this small insect that apparently was eating a moth tucked under a wildflower. Would love to know what it is!
Thank you!
Signature: Laura Hayes

Ambush Bug eats Skipper

Ambush Bug eats Skipper

Hi Laura,
The predator is a Jagged Ambush Bug in the genus
Phymata, and the prey is a butterfly known as a Skipper, not a moth.  Ambush Bugs frequently await prey while camouflaged on blossoms.  Your images are wonderful, both the action image and the excellent use of scale.

Ambush Bug

Ambush Bu

Thank you for the prompt reply and solving my mystery. I knew that was a Skipper! I still want to think of them as moths and forget.
Laura Hayes

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Colourful bugs from South Mexico
Location: South Mexico – jungle
September 23, 2014 5:09 am
Further to my previous email I wondered if you could identify this very colourful bug? I have tried but to no avail. Searching for Mexican insects almost always leads to sites about eating them. I imagine these are probably found in parts of the US as well but I have been unsuccessful none the less. This type of bug is completely beyond my normal range of knowledge… it kind of looks like a really fat leaf-footed/assassin hybrid!
Any ideas?
Signature: Long time avid WTB reader

Immature Giant Mesquite Bugs from Mexico

Immature Giant Mesquite Bugs from Mexico

Dear Long time avid WTB reader,
These colorful nymphs are immature Giant Mesquite Bugs in the genus
Thasus.  Interestingly, this is an edible species and we are surprised you didn’t find it on the edible sites you searched.  There is a North American species of Giant Mesquite Bug that is found primarily in Arizona.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination