Currently viewing the category: "True Bugs"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Guanacaste costa rica
Location: Nosara, guanacaste, costa rica
April 26, 2016 4:10 pm
This bug was rolling what looked like a small ball of dirt or dung very efficiently- almost dribbling it like a soccer ball.
Many of them were huddled in clusters. It was the afternoon on a dirt road.
Signature: Cilan

Immature Red Bug

Immature Red Bug

Dear Cilan,
This is an immature Red Bug in the family Pyrrhocoridae, and it looks like this image posted to FlickR.  We suspect the ball is actually a seed and the Red Bug is feeding from the seed.  Like other insects in the order Hemiptera, the mouth is designed for piercing and sucking.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: what kind of bug is this
Location: philippines
March 31, 2016 3:58 pm
Hi,
Good day, I want to know what kind of insects or bug is this. I was 6 months pregnant and I lost my baby because I had a preterm labor and I gave birth too early , Im thinking one of the reason is the night after I gave birth. I had bitten by insect or bug then after an hour I had rashes and then I experience difficulty of breathing until I fall asleep. When I woke up I already had my contraction for several hours and gave birth too early and sadly my baby died because the doctor said his lungs are not yet fully developed. I really wanted to know what kind of bug is this and what are the effects when you get bit by this bug.
I will truely appreciate your response.
Thank you,
Signature: What kind of bug

Assassin Bug

Assassin Bug

We are sorry to learn about your tragedy, and we cannot say for certain that an insect bite was the cause.  This Assassin Bug may be a member of the blood-sucking subfamily Triatominae.  You can find out more information on the subfamily by referring to the online article The Kissing Bug in Quezon City, Philippines.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: White liquid being excreted
Location: Florida panhandle
March 31, 2016 7:31 am
I think this is a leaf footed bug, but I’m not sure. It was pushing out this white stuff on both sides just past his hind legs. Do you know what bug it is and what it’s excreting? We live in the Florida panhandle and he is on a maple tree just starting to bloom.
Signature: Amy Brown

Helmeted Squash Bug

Helmeted Squash Bug

Dear Amy,
We have correctly identified your Leaf Footed Bug as a Helmeted Squash Bug,
Euthochtha galeator, thanks to images on BugGuide.  According to BugGuide:  “Males have a white- or cream-colored spur or flap on the posterodorsal corner of the side of the thorax (metepimeron) next to the abdomen. No other insect in e. US has such a projection.”   There is no explanation regarding the use of that projection which you mistook for an excretion.  According to Featured Creatures:  “Males have a white- or cream-colored spur or flap on the posterodorsal corner of the side of the thorax (metepimeron) next to the abdomen. This easily is spotted in the field. No other known insect in eastern U.S. has such a projection. The females lack this flap but do have a whitish callus in the metapleural area.”

Helmeted Squash Bug

Helmeted Squash Bug

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Plague of red flying insects
Location: San Pedro de Macoris, Dominican Republic
March 14, 2016 7:15 pm
Help! I have a plague of these red beetley insects coming into my new apartment. There are about 30+ that have entered. They fly and they seem drawn to people. I live in the Dominican Republic in a new apartment building surrounded by sugarcane farms. It’s sugar cane harvest season right now and they’re burning a lot of the fields. Help! I need to know how to keep them out of my house!
Signature: Grace

St Andrews Cotton Stainer

St Andrews Cotton Stainer

Hi Grace,
This is a St Andrews Cotton Stainer,
Dysdercus andreae, and you can find out more information on American Insects where it states:  “In the West Indies this species develops on the seeds of the Portia tree (Thespesia populnea), a member of the mallow family that grows along the shoreline. The bugs can also develop on cotton, and in fact Dr. Harold Grau and his associates at Christopher Newport University have demonstrated that the species grows larger on cotton than on Thespesia populnea.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Identification
Location: Napier, Western Cape, South Africa
March 10, 2016 9:38 am
Daniel
I found the camouflaged insect this morning (Thursday 10 March) by accident (first JPG) – if it hadn’t moved to avoid my hosepipe I would not have seen it. About 1cm long, and keeping very still among the autumn leaf litter … we’ve had this property since end 2003, and this is the first time I’ve seen anything like it. …
Thanks
Signature: Johann van der Merwe

What's That Bug?

What’s That Bug?

Hi Again Johann,
We split your request into two postings.  We have no idea what this camouflaged insect is, but we are relatively certain it is a True Bug in the suborder Heteroptera.  We are going to throw this out as a challenge to our readership to assist in its identification.

Daniel
Thank you for all the trouble you take in identifying these insects – it is appreciated.
Regards
Johann

Karl Identifies the Spiny Bug.
Hi Daniel and Johann:
It looks like a Coreid bug in the genus Pephricus (Coreidae: Coreinae: Phyllomorphini). The common name may be Spiny Bug, which would certainly make sense. Regards.
Karl

Wow.  Thanks so much Karl.  We never would have guessed that this Spiny Bug was in the family Coreidae.

Karl
You are spot on … what I found is undoubtedly a Pephricus Coreidae.
As Len de Beer said, a leaf mimic with amazing spines.
Thank you very much.
Regards
Johann

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Boxelder Relative?
Location: Snohomish, WA
March 30, 2016 4:18 pm
We have numerous of these on our south facing exterior walls. The closest images I have found that look like these are the Boxelder, although ours do not have the reddish-orange coloring. I always attempt to let nature police itself the best I can. (Paper wasps in outdoor light fixture annually, which my wife hates.) We have many jumping spiders that patrol the same south facing walls, but I haven’t seen any of these little beetles fall prey to them yet. Hopefully, these are not an infestation that needs to be addressed. Thank you for your time!
Signature: CEROE

Mediterranean Seed Bug

Mediterranean Seed Bug

Dear CEROE,
We believe this is a Mediterranean Seed Bug,
Xanthochilus saturnius, a species that according to BugGuide is:  “native to Europe and the Mediterranean, adventive in NA (WA-CA) and now locally abundant.”  According to the Pacific Northwest Insect Management Handbook:  ” There is very little known about these bugs, possibly because they are not major economic pests. They do cause anxiety among homeowners, and costly eradication expenses.”  The PNIM Handbook also states:  “Even though they do no damage to house, humans, or pets, these seed bugs become a huge annoyance and costly to exterminate when they migrate into households.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination