Currently viewing the category: "True Bugs"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bedbug
Location: California Sacramento
March 1, 2014 2:25 pm
Is this a bedbug?
Signature: Diana

Bed Bug

Bed Bug

Dear Diana,
Your image is quite blurry, however, this does appear to be a Bed Bug.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Gem on legs
Location: Teresopolis, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
March 2, 2014 9:19 am
We spent about half an hour chasing this beauty with our camera, randomly shooting and battling the autofocus sabotage system.
It was parading on the main paved road of the Serra dos Orgaos National Park, Teresopolis.
The colours remind me of a pest beetle from my youth, an American import which was harmfull to our European crops during the 80’s.
But the form and texture of its shield are more complex.
Signature: LickaFoot

Stink Bug Nymph

Stink Bug Nymph

Dear LickaFoot,
This is an immature Stink Bug nymph in the family Pentatomidae, or possibly a nymph of a Shield Bug in a closely related family Scutelleridae.  We are posting the image and we hope to be able to provide you with a species identification soon.  Shield Bugs are sometimes called Jewel Bugs because of their bright metallic coloration.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: UK Unknown Bug
Location: London
February 26, 2014 8:23 am
Hi i just killed a bug that i saw and i have never seen anything like it in the UK i asked my family n friends and they have never seen anything like it too and i can’t find anything on it on the internet. hope you can identify it please?
Signature: Craig Tanner

Western Conifer Seed Bug

Western Conifer Seed Bug

Hi Craig,
The Western Conifer Seed Bug, is a North American species native to the Pacific Northwest.  As early as the 1960s, its North American range was greatly expanded, probably influenced by being able to stow away with the belongings of humans who are getting increasingly more mobile.  We learned that they were first documented in Northern Europe in the early years of the 21st millenium, and it appears that this Invasive Exotic species is now firmly established in the Old World.  British Bugs has additional information.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Do I have bedbugs?
Location: Elko, NV
February 26, 2014 12:31 am
Bugman
For the past week I have found these little bugs in my daughters room on her wall surrounding her night light. I get rid of them daily and each morning there are 5-10 more bugs around her night light. I have searched everywhere in her room for more of them, or to see if I can find a nest or more signs of them but nothing. I haven’t found them anywhere else in the house. She has no bite marks or rashes. I’m not sure how to get rid of them or find out where they are coming from. I have no pets but just moved into my home 5 months ago it is a older home and was vacant for 3 years prior to us moving in.
Please help me??
Signature: Freaked out by bugs.

Bed Bugs

Bed Bugs

Dear Freaked out by bugs,
You have a serious problem with either Bed Bugs, or another closely related, blood sucking relative in the family Cimicidae.  According to BugGuide, they are:  “ectoparasites of birds and mammals; most are associated with birds & bats, only 2 spp. (
Cimex lectularius and C. hemipterus) are permanently associated with humans.”  We urge you to take immediate action as you have an infestation, judging by the numbers you cite and the size of the individuals in the images you provided.  They are definitely reproducing nearby.

Bed Bugs

Bed Bugs

Even species not normally associated with humans will bite sleeping people if no other prey is available.  Most of the identification requests we receive of potential Bed Bugs are Carpet Beetle larvae or something too blurry to identify, but you have the real deal.

Bed Bugs

Bed Bugs

Thank you much for quick response.  Now I’m totally freaked out.  What is the best course of action to take to insure that I get rid of all of them? That they don’t come back?  Is this something I can do on my own or do I need to find professional help?
Thanks

We just approved a comment to your site from a pest control agency that states:  “These are definitely bed bugs. Freaked out by bugs should definitely check the crevices of the daughter’s mattress, along with the sheets, pillows and night stand. There is definitely an infestation and it should be treated immediately.”  It would require incredible diligence on your part to eradicate the infestation.  This would be a situation where we believe the best course of action would be to have a professional assess the situation.  Eradication is compounded by the fact that Bed Bugs can survive a long time without feeding.

 

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Need to identifyH
Location: Hyderbad, Andhra pradesh, India.
February 25, 2014 1:51 am
Hello bugman,
I just discovered this blog, I would like to know this bugs name. I found it near a lake covered with hyacinth in Hyderbad, Andhra pradesh, India.
I have my gallery on http://www.flickr.com/photos/morbidillusion
Please let me know. Thanks a bunch. I’m your fan already
Signature: Saloni

Lychee Shield Bug

Lychee Shield Bug

Hi Saloni,
There are several very similar looking Jewel Bugs in the family Scutellaridae from India, but we believe your individual is a Lychee Shield Bug,
Chrysocoris stolli, which is well documented on the internet, including on Dave’s Garden

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this?
Location: Eastern Canada
February 23, 2014 5:26 pm
I have found these in my basement over the last 6 months both in early fall and winter. I am in Southern Ontario, Canada. It is small white and looks like a crab. When I have see them, I only see one.
Signature: KG

Masked Hunter

Masked Hunter

Dear KG,
This is an immature Assassin Bug, and it is commonly called a Masked Hunter,
Reduvius personatus , because the sticky surface of the immature insect causes dust and debris to stick to it, masking it in its surroundings.  Masked Hunters might bite if carelessly handled, but they are important predators.  If allowed to remain in the home, they will naturally help to control populations of undesirable creatures like Cockroaches and Bed Bugs.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination