Currently viewing the category: "True Bugs"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Stink bug
Location: Rietfontein, Pretoria, South Africa
January 9, 2014 12:54 am
I found two small almost totally white insects in my garden on 31 December 2013 and suspect that they are stink bugs. What fascinated me when I looked at the photographs was the form of their mouths; it looked like dolphins!
Your help in identifying this is highly appreciated.
Signature: Robert Erasmus

Stink Bug

Stink Bug

Hi Robert,
We agree that this is a Stink Bug or Stinkgogga as you call it, and that it is in the family Pentatomidae, but it really doesn’t have any distinguishing features that would help us (remember we are not entomologists) beyond the family level.  There are some similar looking images on ISpot, including this individual, but they are only identified to the family level as well.

Stink Bug

Stink Bug

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Leaf Footed Bug
Location: Rietfontein, Pretoria, South Africa
January 9, 2014 12:00 am
In response to an earlier post I am sending two photos of a bug that I suspect is a Leaf Footed or True bug. It was observed in my garden during summer (November) 2013. Your identification help is highly appreciated.
Signature: Robert Erasmus

Immature True Bug

Immature True Bug

Hi Robert,
We are currently experiencing a technical situation that we don’t quite understand and that has caused us to contact our webmaster.  The comment you supplied to our old posting of Possibly Leaf Footed Bug Nymph from South Africa has appeared in our email account, but not to the posting itself, so we cannot approve the comment to the site.  We are happy you submitted your own photographs and we would like to address your questions.  It is interesting that you labeled one file as a Stink Bug and one as a True Bug.  We still believe the posting you originally commented upon is likely a Leaf Footed Bug, and we agree that your nymph appears to be a Stink Bug or Shield Bug nymph.  Nymphs can be notoriously difficult to identify as they often differ considerably from adults and it is generally the adult or imago that appears in identification guide books.  With that said, we will attempt to research your request.  In the meantime, we will go live and enlist the assistance of our readership, and we will follow our gut instincts and classify this as a Stink Bug or Shield Bug.

True Bug Nymph

True Bug Nymph

Update:
Your nymph looks similar to, but not identical to, this Stink Bug nymph from Pretoria that is posted to Project Noah.  We found a pretty good match on ISpot, but it is not identified beyond the Stink Bug family Pentatomidae.

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Pirate Bug?
Location: Picton NSW Australia
January 4, 2014 6:41 am
Hi friends
We have an immense amount of these bugs recently inhabit our farm. I can’t pinpoint them down to any host (though they do seem attracted to light). They are everywhere (seemingly doing no harm), although I recently discovered that they also suck the blood of humans (photo 2). I have been researching and the closest photographic identifications I can find is resemble the minute pirate bug or the big eyed bug.
We have a infestation of the Cabbage Whitefly (Aleyrodes proletella), so perhaps they could be a predator of these…..?
Thanks for your help.
Scott Bazely
Peppercorn Creek Organic Farm
Picton NSW
Australia
Signature: Scott Bazely

Probably Minute Pirate Bug

Probably Minute Pirate Bug

Dear Scott,
We believe you have correctly identified these True Bugs as being Minute Pirate Bugs in the family Anthocoridae, but we will try to get a second opinion.  According to BugGuide, they eat “small arthropods” and “Some species are used as biocontrol agents. Some may be a nuisance: they are known for their irritating bites, mostly after landing on one’s naked arm or neck.”  That is very consistent with what you have experienced.  Since they are not concentrated on a single plant, we would eliminate the possibility that they are a phytophagous or plant eating pest.

Minute Pirate Bug bites human

Minute Pirate Bug bites human

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Tiny Bugs on sofa?
Location: Los Angeles
December 26, 2013 11:41 pm
Can you tell me what these are? Found them in the cushions around a fabric sofa in my living room.
We live in L.A., CA. Thought maybe immature bed bugs, but don’t look right.
Signature: Stownsend

Blood Sucking Conenose Bug Nymphs

Blood Sucking Conenose Bug Nymphs

Dear Stownsend,
We would love to get a second opinion on this matter, but we are pretty certain that these are the immature nymphs of a Bloodsucking Conenose Bug in the genus
Triatoma.  Also known as “Kissing Bugs, Big Bed Bugs, Mexican Bed Bugs, Bellows Bugs” according to BugGuide, Blood Sucking Conenose Bugs are a known vector for Chagas Disease.  Though this tends to occur more often in the tropics, there have been occurances of Chagas Disease in the U.S.   See this photo on BugGuide for comparison.  We would urge you to take immediate action to eliminate these Bloodsucking Conenose Bug nymphs.

Blood Sucking Conenose nymphs

Blood Sucking Conenose nymphs

Ed. Note
We get slightly annoyed when we respond to an identification request and then we receive a spam blocker reply like the one below.  We generally ignore them but in this case, we decided to take the time to decipher the cryptic code that ensures the email came from a person and not some internet bot.

I apologize for this automatic reply to your email.
To control spam, I now allow incoming messages only from senders I have approved beforehand.
If you would like to be added to my list of approved senders, please fill out the short request form (see link below). Once I approve you, I will receive your original message in my inbox. You do not need to resend your message. I apologize for this one-time inconvenience.

Thank you Daniel.  That certainly looks like the critters.  I still have the nymphs.  the Los Angeles County Agricultural comm. Entomologist wants to examine them for ID.  Can I send one to you or somewhere?
Thanks so much for your help.   Stanley Townsend, Los Angeles

Hi Stanley,
You are best to send them to the the county agency and you may want to contact the LA County Museum of Natural History.  We do not accept specimens, only photographs.  Please let us know what you learn.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Insect identification
Location: Rio de janeiro, brazil
December 31, 2013 6:48 am
HI,
WOULD YOU HELP ME TO KNOW WHAT KIND OF BUG IS THIS?
IT HAS HALF OF AN INCH,
IT IS VERY BEAUTIFUL, AND I DON T KNOW IF IT BITES.
THANKS
Signature: ANTONIO

Immature Giant Mesquite Bug

Immature Giant Mesquite Bug

Dear Antonio,
This is an immature Giant Mesquite Bug in the genus
Thasus, and they are much more colorful before they metamorphose into adults.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bug
Location: Columbus, OH
December 29, 2013 7:15 pm
What kind of bug is this? I’m in Columbus, OH and it’s winter. This is the third one I’ve seen in two days in my house. 2 in my upstairs bedroom & one in my downstairs living room.
Signature: Jess

Stink Bug

Stink Bug

Hi Jess,
This is a Stink Bug in the family Pentatomidae, and Stink Bugs often enter homes to hibernate when the weather cools.
  Your photo lacks critical clarity, but we believe this is a Brown Marmorated Stink Bug, Halyomorpha halys, an invasive, exotic species from Asia that is spreading in North America.  More information on the Brown Marmorated Stink Bug can be found on Field Crop News.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination