Currently viewing the category: "True Bugs"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Please help identify
Location: Kingsland, Tx
March 17, 2016 8:13 pm
My daughter scooped this out of our pond thinking she was rescuing a walking stick. Her sister came to get me to see it saying it had red wings under the black back covers (her words). When I got there, I took this picture and told them it was not a walking stick and before I could take another look it flew away!
Signature: Luckyclucks

Water Scorpion

Water Scorpion

Dear Luckyclucks,
Though we are aware that the common name Toe-Biter can be applied to your submission, we prefer the common name Water Scorpion for this aquatic predator so as not to confuse it with the Giant Water Bug.  Either should be handled with caution as they are capable of biting and the bite is reported to be painful, but not dangerous.

Thank you! Good thing my girls are gentle with wildlife.  A good reminder to use caution with unknown wildlife.
We found a giant water bug carcass a couple of weeks ago and were so excited to have the specimen!
Love your site and refer to it often!
Warmly,
~Lindsay

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this demon
Location: Newcastle, NSW Australia.
March 18, 2016 1:31 am
This huge bug was found and after taking a beating from a broom was still alive. It was greyish in colour on the back and a lot bigger but unfortunately after a degreaser bath seemed to shrink a little and change colour.
Signature: I need an exorcist!

Toe-Biter

Toe-Biter

Giant Water Bugs like the one you “degreased” are commonly called Toe-Biters in North America.  According to the Australian Museum, other common names include Electric Light Bug and Giant Fishkiller.  A Queensland Museum pdf fact-sheet-water-bugs-water-scorpions indicates it is the largest true bug in Australia and that Toe-Biter is also an acceptable name down under.   Wannabee Entomologist has a fun posting.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Please identify this
Location: Kentucky
March 9, 2016 10:22 pm
Small brownish color.
Signature: Dwillb

Bed Bug

Bed Bug

Dear Dwillb,
Despite your blurry image, this sure looks like a Bed Bug to us.  The Bed Bug is our featured Bug of the Month this month.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What’s this bug?!
Location: Massachusetts
March 10, 2016 5:56 am
This insect survives all winter and gathers by the hundreds in clusters on the south side of my home, in the sun. They find their way inside my home and I release them. Are they harmful and how can I get them to leave the area without killing them?!
Thank you! Kevin
Signature: Kph

Democrat Bug

Democrat Bug

Dear Kevin,
This is an Eastern Boxelder Bug,
Boisea trivittata, but we are really amused at its other common name, Democrat Bug, so we are postdating your submission to go live the day before the primary elections Tuesday to remind our readers to get out and vote.  Eastern Boxelder Bugs hibernate over the winter, and they will emerge on sunny days exactly as you describe.  Eastern Boxelder Bugs are benign, though they can become a nuisance when they appear in great numbers, especially if they decide to hibernate indoors.  If you are not troubled with their appearance, you can safely allow them to sun themselves as they pose no threat to you, your pets or your home, nor do they damage plants as they feed primarily on seeds.  The common name Democrat Bug, as well as names like Populist Bug and Politician Bug, refers to the communal habits of the Boxelder Bugs, and in light of the political circus of the 2016 primary season, we will be featuring your submission for the duration of the election season.

Very helpful, thank you for taking the time to respond.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Red & black bug
Location: Lake Jackson Tx
March 6, 2016 6:46 am
Dear Bugman
I was curious about this red & black bug I’ve seen several times here on the Texas Gulf Coast, will it hurt my plants & does it bite?
Thanks in advance!
Signature: Rae Nichols

Milkweed Assassin Bug nymph

Milkweed Assassin Bug nymph

Dear Rae,
This is an immature Milkweed Assassin Bug,
 Zelus longipes, a predatory species that will help to eliminate harmful pests from your garden.  Though they are not aggressive toward humans, you may encounter a bite if you carelessly handle an Assassin Bug.

Thank you so much! I will be sure to leave it alone & not touch it Thank you!!
Rae

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Fat orange juvenile(?) insect.
Location: Walnut Creek CA open space near pond.
February 29, 2016 7:06 pm
I found the group of orange insects with black spots near water last August, in the Walnut Creek Open Space, California. Later I found an earlier picture of a what must be a close relative of this bug in my files. I don’t know where I found it. That one does not have the spots.
I hope you can tell me what these critters are.
Signature: Dirk Muehlner

Large Milkweed Bug Nymphs

Large Milkweed Bug Nymphs

Dear Dirk,
We wish you had not cropped your image.  These sure look like Large Milkweed Bug nymphs,
Oncopeltus fasciatus, based on this BugGuide image, and they do appear to be feeding on milkweed pods, but we would love to see more of the plant to try to identify the species of milkweed.  The image you captured earlier is also a True Bug in the suborder Heteroptera, but from there the taxonomies diverge.  The Large Milkweed Bugs are Seed Bugs in the family Lygaeidae and the other is a solitary Western Boxelder Bug nymph, Boisea rubrolineata, in the Scentless Plant Bug family Rhopalidae which you can verify on BugGuide

Western Boxelder Bug Nymph

Western Boxelder Bug Nymph

Update:  March 7, 2016
Hi Daniel
Thank you for identifying these Large Milkweed Bug larvae!  You regretted that my image was cropped and I found a less cropped version, for what it’s worth.

Large Milkweed Bugs (juvenile)

Large Milkweed Bugs (juvenile)

Thanks again.   I really appreciate your response to my query.
Dirk

Wow Dirk,
We are so excited to get an image that includes the narrow leaf milkweed seed pods and the leaf is also visible.  Las Pilitas Nursery has more wonderful information on the California Narrow Leaf Milkweed, a critical plant in a vibrant ecosystem that we profile in Milkweed Meadow.

Narrow Leaf Milkweed with Large Milkweed Bug nymphs

Narrow Leaf Milkweed with Large Milkweed Bug nymphs

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination