Currently viewing the category: "True Bugs"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Beetles on Loofah flowers
Location: Kedah, Malaysia
February 5, 2014 2:49 am
I found these two insects on yellow loofah flowers. I am not sure if the two are related (e.g. male/female). Both are small, body is about 1 cm long.
The brown and orange one have leaf-footed like feature.
Weather : Hot and humid
Climate : Tropical
Signature: Cohlinn

Weevil and Immature Citron Bug

Gold Dust Weevil and Immature Citron Bug

Hi again Cohlinn,
The yellow insect with what we believe is an immature Citron Bug is a Weevil, one of a group of beetles in the superfamily Curculionoidea.  At first we did have not had any luck identifying the species despite locating two matching images online.  There is an unidentified Weevil posted to The Flying Kiwi’s Cambodian Bugs page (scroll down to see it), and another image of an individual taken in Malaysia posted to FlickR.  Another unidentified individual is pictured on Interesting PHotos.  We then located some images on Project Noah that are identified as Gold Dust Weevils,
Hypomeces squamosus.  An individual from China is pictured on SinoBug.  Finally, a mating pair is pictured on PBase.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Beetles on Loofah flowers
Location: Kedah, Malaysia
February 5, 2014 2:49 am
I found these two insects on yellow loofah flowers. I am not sure if the two are related (e.g. male/female). Both are small, body is about 1 cm long.
The brown and orange one have leaf-footed like feature.
Weather : Hot and humid
Climate : Tropical
Signature: Cohlinn

Citron Bug

Immature Citron Bug

Dear Cohlinn,
We are going to handle your identification requests independently.  The insect that is pictured in three of your photos which you have described as “the brown and orange one have leaf-footed like feature” is actually a Leaf Footed Bug in the family Coreidae, and we believe we have identified it as a Citron Bug,
Leptoglossus gonagra, thanks to a photo posted on The Flying Kiwi.  According to Citrus Pests ID Tools, its worldwide distribution is “Cape Verde Islands, the Caribbean, Central America, Indonesia, Malaysia, Mexico, Pacific Islands, Papau New Guinea, and South America” but the native range is “not reported.”  The undeveloped wings indicate that this is an immature specimen.  Though the Citron Bug is reported from North America, BugGuide does not have any images of an immature individual.  Discover Life, which does not provide a photo, indicates the common name is Passionvine Bug.  The red nymphs pictured on Nature Love You are much younger than your nymph.  We cannot locate an image of an immature Citron Bug that resembles your individual, and we are basing our identification on the orange markings on the ventral view which resemble the markings on the adult, including the individual posted on Forestry Images.

Immature Citron Bug

Immature Citron Bug

Hi Daniel,
Thank you so much for your hard work! I did not expect an immature version of the Citron bug. That’s probably why I couldn’t find any pictures of a bug with a single large orange dot on the back. I think you are right. IDTools mentioned that it is pest to passion fruit and there are passion fruit vines right next to the loofah plant I caught these in. Now I know what’s been marring the passion fruit skins.
Thank you again.
Cohlinn

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Please identify
Location: NW Arkansas, USA
January 31, 2014 9:59 pm
This bug has wings and a proboscis thingy that it “bit” me with. The bite didn’t itch, it stung and hurt. I’ve lived in several states and never seen it before.
Signature: Thanks for your help, Amy

Assassin Bug

Assassin Bug

Hi Amy,
You were bitten by an Assassin Bug in the genus
ZelusWhile the bite is reported to be painful and the effects last several days, there will be no lasting harm to you.  Assassin Bugs are important predators that occasionally find their way indoors.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bug in Car
Location: Redlands, Ca
January 29, 2014 10:25 pm
Found this bug in the car in Redlands, California
Terrified the wife. The only power I have over her is not being terrified by bugs myself.
Would love to know what you think it is.
Thank you for your expertise.
Signature: Dana Law

Western Leaf Footed Bug

Western Leaf Footed Bug

leaf footed bug genus Leptoglossus

Daniel,
You’re awesome!
I’ll make a well deserved donation later today when I’m at my desktop.
Thank you,
Dana Law
San Diego

Thanks Dana,
I dashed that answer off before rushing out to go to work.  I should have told you they are harmless.

Daniel,
I had a feeling it wasn’t dangerous.
It was excited to learn what it was. The penultimate example of the “Hive” mind.
The best minds brought together by technology, experience and knowledge.
These are the best of times.
Thanks again.
Dana Law
P.S. Here’s a slug from southern Washington on the Pacific Crest Trail. Not a bug but……

Hi again Dana,
Now that you have sufficiently fluffed our ego, we decided to dig through the trash, prepare your photo for the web, and provide a bit more information for a true posting.  We believe this is a Western Leaf Footed Bug,
Leptoglossus clypealis, based on the BugGuide description “A spine extending forwards from the tip of the head (the tylus) is distinctive.”  See this image on BugGuide for a closeup of the tylus.  A more dorsal view of this Leaf Footed Bug from above would make our suspicion more definite as the tylus is partially obscured by the antennae.  Though we have already indicated this Western Leaf Footed Bug is not harmful to humans, BugGuide notes:  “Can be a pest in pistacio, almond, plums” and we have also observed them feeding on pomegranates.  They feed by piercing the skin of the fruit with their proboscis and sucking fluids from the plant.  The release of an enzyme at the site of the feeding results in blemishes on the fruit that make parts of it inedible to humans.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Pyrrhocoridae
Location: South San Francisco, CA
January 29, 2014 9:34 pm
I like to send flowers to my girlfriend (email photos), as I come across many nice landscapes while I’m in the field. Today these yellow daisies caught my eye, and the colorful insect made it all the more interesting. Thanks to your site, and the rest of the web, I believe this to be a type of cotton stainer in the Pyrrhocoridae Family.
The last few weeks have been unseasonably warm with almost no rain. We had a dry cold snap in December. Today was cloudy, cool and misty. Is this insect usually found in Northern California?
Signature: Teltec

Cotton Stainer

Whitecrossed Seed Bug

Dear Teltec,
We agree that this appears to be a Cotton Stainer in the genus
Dysdercus, and we have not been able to locate any information confirming them occurring in California.  According to BugGuide’s data, there are some species found in Arizona, including the Two Spotted Cotton Stainer, Dysdercus bimaculatus, but this is most definitely not that species.  The Texas Entomology page Checklist of North American Cotton Stainers does contain sightings in California.  With so much global travel, it is possible this was a recent introduction.

Correction  May 3, 2014:  Whitecrossed Seed Bug
Thanks to a comment from Scott Carroll, we have updated the posting to include the correction on this Whitecrossed Seed Bug, Neacoryphus bicrucis, which is pictured on BugGuide.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Red Bugs in my new Garden
Location: South Africa
January 29, 2014 5:52 am
Hi! I’ve just moved into a new house and these mysterious red bugs are all over the garden. They don’t seem to be “dangerous” since they’ve crawled over me many times without biting me. They nest in crevices in the wall and the pavement and in shrubs. I can be wrong, but Im sure I’ve seen that they eat some of the plants. I have also seen them eat old figs that have fallen from the tree. It’s summer now, and I’ve only lived here since the beginning of summer – so I don’t know how prevalent they are during winter months. Thanks so much!
Signature: Philip

Aggregation of Red Bugs

Aggregation of Soapberry Bugs

Hi Philip,
Interestingly, these really are Red Bugs or Cotton Stainers in the family Pyrrhocoridae, and we believe they are both winged adults and wingless nymphs of 
Cenaeus carnifex.  You may verify that on South African Photographs.

Close up of Red Bugs

Close up of Soapberry Bugs

Correction:  Soapberry Bugs, not Red Bugs
May 3, 2014
We just received a comment from Scott Carroll correcting this identification.  It seems Soapberry Bug is a subfamily Serinethinae that includes our North American Boxelder Bugs and Red Shouldered Bugs.  We even located the Soapberry Bugs of the World website.

Cenaeus carnifex

Leptocoris mutilatus

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination