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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Pink Assessin/long nosed bug
Location: Courtice , ontario
December 1, 2015 5:35 pm
Hello
It has been awhile since I asked for an ID . I am going over my summer pics of insects and I have a couple I would love identified . Location Courtice, Ontario. In a field near courtice arena.
One is a pink prickly looking bug the other a long nosed bug.
Signature: Terri Martin

Spined Assassin Bug

Spined Assassin Bug

Dear Terri,
Your Assassin Bug is a Spined Assassin Bug,
Sinea diadema, and you can compare your image to this image on BugGuide.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Lookin’ Right at me!
Location: Northwest New Jersey
December 6, 2015 10:31 pm
Nasty lookin sucker. I left it alone. Any idea what it is?
Signature: Flex

Spined Assassin Bug

Spined Assassin Bug

Dear Flex,
This looks like a predatory Spined Assassin Bug,
Sinea diadema, or another member of the genus, based on this BugGuide image.  Most Assassin Bugs do not aggressively bite humans, Kissing Bugs being the exceptions, but Assassin Bugs are capable of inflicting a painful bite if carelessly handled, threatened, or accidentally encountered.

Thanks
Somehow I knew not to try to convince it to climb up on my finger.
What a Mug!
Frank Lekstutis

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bug like QVC package..
Location: Willistown Twp, Chester County, PA
December 6, 2015 7:04 am
Hello bug man…
Is this a Western Conifer Seed bug??
Please advise.
Thx!!
Happy holidays!
Signature: Nancy

Western Conifer Seed Bug

Western Conifer Seed Bug

Hi Nancy,
This is a Western Conifer Seed Bug, and it seems it has settled into the packing material in an effort to find shelter from the oncoming winter weather.  This is exactly the type of behavior that we are speculating led to the range expansion of the Western Conifer Seed Bug beginning in the 1960s, when it spread from the Pacific Northwest to eventually include much of North America.  That was about the same time that air travel became more routine, and we believe the Western Conifer Seed Bug stowed away in luggage, eventually finding itself in a new time zone, and establishing itself in a new location.

Thx Daniel!
I ️hav  question …  A local news service make a stink about “deadly kissing bug”…that accord to my untraineyes look similar
To west. Conifer seed bug…
See their video Lin below— Are they mistaken?
PLESE let me know.
Thx SOMMUCh!!!
http://patch.com/pennsylvania/malvern/s/fgzde/watch-this-is-what-a-deadly-kissing-bug-looks-like
Kind regard,
Nancy. :)

Dear Nancy,
Your local news service is wrong.  The bug pictured in the video is a Western Conifer Seed Bug in the Leaf Footed Bug family Coreidae, NOT a Kissing Bug, a similar looking insect from the Assassin Bug Family Reduviidae.  There is currently much coverage on Kissing Bugs, that do spread Chagas Disease, but it is very irresponsible of your local news outlet to fuel paranoia by picturing the wrong insect in their coverage.  Sightings of Western Conifer Seed Bugs are much more common than sightings of Eastern Blood-Sucking Conenose Bugs or Kissing Bugs in your area.  You should write to your local news agency and inform them of their error and ask that they correct their posting.  They probably do not have an entomologist on the staff and the reporter did not do her due diligence by following up the submitted video with a local expert at a natural history museum.

That what I thought!!!! Thx for confirmation!  I WILL let THME know!  :)

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: please help me identify
Location: Southern Illinois
December 5, 2015 7:42 pm
I don’t know if these are all three the same bug. But all appeared within 24 hours. I live in southern Illinois
Signature: worriedmom

Bed Bugs

Bed Bugs

Dear worriedmom,
The largest and medium insect are definitely Bed Bugs that feed on the blood of humans while they are sleeping.  The smallest insect is most likely also a Bed Bug.  You probably have an infestation and you may want to consider contacting your landlord or a professional if you are the homeowner.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this
Location: London, Ontario, Canada
December 6, 2015 8:07 am
This bug can fly. Have no idea where it came from or what it is but we’ve had 4 of these in our home in the last month. 3 of which were in the last 2 weeks. They were first seen outside in the back yard then they started appearing in the house. We generally don’t keep flowers in the house, the ones in the picture are a birthday gift for my daughter so I’m positive I can rule that out as an attraction for this bug.
We are in London, Ontario, Canada.
The first time we’ve seen one of these guys would have been the back yard back in the summer so temperatures would have been in the 20C and upwards.
Current outdoor temperature is on average approx 2 – 10 C.
Signature: Rob

Western Conifer Seed Bug

Western Conifer Seed Bug

Hi Rob,
This Western Conifer Seed Bug is native to the Pacific Northwest, but beginning in the 1960s, it expanded its range, probably helped by increased human air travel, across North America.  Western Conifer Seed Bugs seek shelter indoors to hibernate when the weather cools.  It will not harm you or your home, but large number indoors may be a nuisance.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Pretty Turk’s and Caicos Insect
Location: Turks and Caicos
December 1, 2015 7:52 am
Good day!
Can you tell me what this insect is? We found them in Providenciales, Turks and Caicos. Is it a Turk’s Red Cap?
Cheers,
Signature: Levi

St. Andrews Cotton Stainers

St. Andrews Cotton Stainers

Dear Levi,
Though many islands have endemic species, we believe your Red Bugs in the family Pyrrhocoridae are St. Andrew’s Cotton Stainers,
Dysdercus andreae, a species reported from West Indies according to BugGuide.  Many insects in the family are known to form large aggregations of both adults and nymphs as pictured in your image.  Adults have wings and nymphs do not.  Turk’s Red Cap may be a local name, but when we researched that all we found were numerous references to a plant in the genus Malvaviscus as pictured on Almost Eden.

Wow, thank you so much for the help!

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination