Currently viewing the category: "True Bugs"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: whatttt thee ????
Location: Michigan
May 12, 2014 7:41 pm
I live in michigan I have never seen a bug like this was wondering what it is?
Signature: Cadey W

Masked Hunter

Masked Hunter

Dear Cadey,
Your first image is of a Masked Hunter, a predatory and beneficial Assassin Bug that might bite if carelessly handled, but it will also help to keep your house free of other problematic insects including blood sucking Bed Bugs.  Masked Hunters have earned their common name because immature individuals have a sticky surface that attracts debris to camouflage or mask it in its surroundings. WE are guessing that your other images are of the same Masked Hunter, unmasked after perhaps a spray from the canned insecticide.  We hope we have convinced you that the Masked Hunter is a beneficial insect that should not be killed unnecessarily, so we are tagging this posting as Unnecessary Carnage.

Masked Hunter, unmasked

Masked Hunter, unmasked

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Two inch long horned beetle?
Location: Found in water
May 8, 2014 7:12 pm
I live in West Virginia and I found this bug in my pool. It was 1 1/2 inches to two inches long it had long horn looking things and a very thick hard shell I would love to know what it is I’ve never seen anything like it!
Signature: Annie Faye

Toe-Biter

Toe-Biter

Dear Annie,
Though they are aquatic, we very rarely get reports of Giant Water Bugs or Toe-Biters that are found in the water.  They are also capable of flight and they are attracted to lights, so most encounters occur on the land.  As the common name implies, Toe-Biters should be handled with care as they are capable of delivering a painful bite.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Gross bugs
Location: Belen,NM,USA
May 4, 2014 2:50 pm
These bugs are everywhere and I have no idea what they are? Please help us.
Signature: Alyssa

Stink Bug Nymphs

Stink Bug Nymphs

Hi Alyssa,
Based on this image we found on BugGuide, your Stink Bug nymphs are in the genus
Cholorchroa.

Stink Bug Nymph

Stink Bug Nymph

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: I can’t find this one anywhere please help
Location: I think Australia
May 4, 2014 4:34 pm
Hey bugman buddy, I was wondering if you could help me identify this colorful bug. Thanks for all your help I will try to also make a donation soon. Thanks again
Signature: Brandon

Cotton Harlequin Bug

Cotton Harlequin Bug

Hi Brandon,
We didn’t notice until we were actually creating a posting that this photo was taken in “I think Australia” which leads us to think you did not take the image.  Please clarify where the image came from if you did not take it as our submission clearly states:  “Also, you swear that you either took the photo(s) yourself or have explicit permission from the photographer or copyright holder to use the image.”  This is a Cotton Harlequin Bug,
Tectocoris diophthalmus, and it is indeed from Australia.  You can read more about it on the Brisbane Insect website.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Neacoryphus lateralis?
Location: Santa Fe, NM
May 3, 2014 1:08 pm
I was walking around Santa Fe, NM yesterday and somehow ended up with this guy tangled in my hair! My sister extricated it and identified it as some sort of benign seed bug, so we released it nearby after taking some pictures. It looks to me like the Neacoryphus lateralis specimens in your site’s seed bug files. I don’t remember seeing any other individuals in the area, though–just this one!
Signature: Cat

Seed Bug:  Melacoryphus lateralis

Seed Bug: Melacoryphus lateralis

Dear Cat,
We are in total agreement with your identification, but in the interest of modern taxonomy, we need to make a correction.  The genus for this Seed Bug is now listed on BugGuide as being
Melacoryphus lateralis, and there is a note:  “Orig. Comb: Neacoryphus lateralis Dallas, 1852″ which implies genus lumping.

Seed Bug:  Melacoryphus lateralis

Seed Bug: Melacoryphus lateralis

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Thousands of these tiny bugs in my garden
Location: Tempe, AZ
April 30, 2014 7:30 pm
Hello,
I have a permaculture garden in the front yard. Mostly covered in wood chips and compost.
I live in Tempe, Arizona. This evening, I saw thousands of these critters crawling among the rocks, concrete patio and among my sweet alyssum plants.
I have a lot of kale in the yard, one watermelon patch, some cucumber, zucchini, and lots of nasturtium among other edible plants.
Not sure what they are. I don’t normally bother with garden pest because I do organic gardening to avoid killing bees and pollinators.
But the shear number of these bugs scared me a little bit.
Please help me identify.
They are tiny, the largest ones I could find is about 2mm. Attached is photo of the larger one and a group of the smaller ones, that were about 1mm.
These were taken with point and shoot camera and cropped really tight to show the insects.
Signature: Yes

Immature Dirt Colored Seed Bug

Immature False Chinch Bug

A few days ago, we posted an image, also from Arizona, of a very similar immature Heteropteran that we tentatively identified as a Dirt Colored Seed Bug in the family Rhyparochromidae.  It can be very difficult to ascertain a proper identification based on an immature specimen.  Perhaps we will soon learn a proper identification if there is a statewide outbreak of these numerous nymphs.

Immature Dirt Colored Seed Bugs

Immature False Chinch Bugs

Dear Daniel,
Thank you so much for writing back.
After hours of looking through Google. I came to what is the closet to all the different stages of the bug that is in my photo.
False Chinch Bugs
http://www.ext.colostate.edu/pubs/insect/05603.html
Looks like my photos match exactly the different stages of the photo they have on the site “Figure 2. False chinch bug adults and nymphs.”
I also posted a lot more photos I took here:
http://www.phoenixpermaculture.org/forum/topics/i-have-a-huge-amount-of-crawlers-in-the-yard
What do you think?
Thank you.
Sincerely,
Jacq Davis

Hi Jacq,
We believe your False Chinch Bug identification might be correct.  Nymphs can be very difficult to properly identify.  According to BugGuide:  “3 (or more) species are introduced N. caledoniae, huttoni, vinitor” which supports our believe that this might be an invasive exotic species.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination