Currently viewing the category: "True Bugs"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: small brown bug like a lady bug
Location: Southeast region
October 27, 2013 11:30 am
I first noticed one of these bugs in my house on my couch. Then after taking my children outside to play, they were all over my kid’s plastic swingset. We live in Alabama surrounded by lots of undeveloped land. We have lived here for four years, and this is the first time I have noticed this bug. It is about the same size as a lady bug but not as round and it is a dark brown color. It also flies. What kind of bug is this and is it dangerous to my kids? Thanks!
Signature: Jennifer

Lablab Bug

Lablab Bug

Dear Jennifer,
The Lablab Bug is a recently introduced, exotic species that fees upon another exotic introduction, Kudzu.  We expect the Lablab Bugs will proliferate wherever Kudzu can be found.  Lablab Bugs are not dangerous to humans, but they are a nuisance when they are plentiful, which is nearly always.  We will be postdating your submission to go live in early November while we are away from the office.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: cockroach?
Location: seattle, wa
October 31, 2013 1:23 am
Hi, I found this bug on my wall at midnight. I live in sesttle washington. Is it a roach?
Signature: bugman

Western Conifer Seed Bug

Western Conifer Seed Bug

This is not a Cockroach.  It is a Western Conifer Seed Bug, and it has greatly increased its range in the last fifty years.  Seattle is within the natural range of the species.  Western Conifer Seed Bugs often attract attention when the weather begins to cool as they are prone to entering homes to hibernate.

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Identification of beetle
Location: Glendale, CA
October 29, 2013 8:34 pm
Hello,
I am a Biology professor at Glendale College in California, and one of my students sent me this nice photo of beetles mating. I’ve tried to identify them but can’t find anything that looks right. Thanks for your help. I believe the photograph was taken on our campus in Glendale, CA this week (October 2013).
Best,
Maria Kretzmann
Signature: Maria Kretzmann

Mating Red Shouldered Bugs

Mating Red Shouldered Bugs

Hi Maria,
These are not beetles.  They are mating Red Shouldered Bugs,
Jadera haematoloma, and they are in the Scentless Plant Bug family Rhopalidae.  See BugGuide for additional information.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this big bug?
Location: Dubrovnik, Croatia
October 29, 2013 10:22 pm
Hi. I saw this on the ground in Dubrovnik in Croatia in September. I would estimate it to be almost 6inches long. It was dead at the time but it looks like it might have wings. Many thanks
Signature: Mark Bates

Giant Water Bug

Giant Water Bug

Hi Mark,
This is a predatory, aquatic insect known as a Giant Water Bug.  In North America they are called Toe-Biters and they are eaten in Thailand.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Water Striders
Location: Tucquan Glen, Lancaster County PA
October 29, 2013 10:36 am
Hi Daniel!
I read your comment about wishing you had more photographs of water striders. I attached a few shots that I took several weeks ago at Tucquan Glen in Lancaster County PA.
There are two shots of an adult with prey and a group of young individuals. They were not easy to photograph due to their constant motion.
Melody McFarland
Lancaster PA
Signature: Melody McFarland

Water Strider

Water Strider

Hi Melody,
Thanks so much for supplying some additional photos of Water Striders in the family Gerridae for our site.  We see from the metadata on the digital image that your photos were taken on September 26, 2013.  It appears that the adults do not have wings, so we thought they might be nymphs as well, but your individuals resemble this photo from BugGuide of a member of the genus
Trepobates which BugGuide indicates:  “Superficially resembles nymphs of Gerris. First antennomere shorter than three others combined.”  Water Striders are perfectly adapted for skating across the surface of the water, and according to BugGuide:  “fine water-repellant hairs on the underside of the tarsi allow the bug to walk on water’s surface; only the mid- and the hind legs are used for locomotion; they are attached to large coxae connected to the sides of the thorax and are unfit for walking on land.”

Water Striders

Water Striders

Alas, we haven’t the necessary skills to distinguish one species from another or even to definitively determine the correct genus, so our identification might be incorrect.  Your photos which illustrate the feeding habits are a marvelous addition to our archive.

Water Strider

Water Strider

 

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Texas Pool Bugs
Location: Texas
October 28, 2013 8:07 am
please tell me what this thing is!!! have no clue
Signature: thank you TRay

Water Strider

Water Strider

Dear TRay,
We wish we had more photos of Water Striders on our site.  They are amazing true bugs that spend their immature phase skating across the water in search of prey, especially insects that fall onto the water’s surface.  When they attain adulthood, they are capable of flight.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination