Currently viewing the category: "Leaf Footed Bugs"
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Western Conifer Seed Bug

Western Conifer Seed Bug

Subject: Bug for identification
Location: Seattle, WA
October 10, 2014 7:09 pm
Hello!!
I live in Seattle, Washington and we have had a warm summer for us (80 degree days) and we are now entering our fall season and the temperature has dropped to the 70’s. I have had a few of these bugs at my house and many of my friends on Facebook have said they have them too and none of us know what they are and are hoping you can help us! We appreciate any information you can provide!!
Thank you!
Signature: Brenda

Dear Brenda,
The Western Conifer Seed Bug,
Leptoglossus occidentalis, is a native species to the Pacific Northwest, but beginning in the 1960s, perhaps due to increased mobility and travel, the range began to expand.  The Western Conifer Seed Bug is now well established in much of the northern part of North America, and in the early part of the 21st century, it became established in Europe as well.  Western Conifer Seed Bugs often go unnoticed until weather begins to cool and they enter homes to hibernate.

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Subject: Poisonous to Humans?
October 11, 2014 3:37 am
I just had to destroy all my Tomato plants because of a mass infestation of HUGE  Leaf Footed Plant
Bugs. There were 7-8 of these bugs on ONE Tomato–many Tomatoes.  I only had 7 Tomato Plants in containers, but they COVERED them all. I live in the desert of Las Vegas, Nevada, and everything I’ve read about them says they are not on this side of the country! The Nevada Extension says they are rare, but not unheard of.   They are now on my Bell Peppers, though not nearly as many.
However, I cannot find out if the toxic enzyme that they inject into the fruit , also allowing pathogens into the fruit safe for human consumption.  I can’t see any obvious damage, and I am very diligent about keeping them off the Bell Peppers.  I don’t want to get myself or family sick. Do you know if they’re poisonous?
Your quick response would be greatly appreciated.     Thank You,  Diane Huff
Signature: Diane Huff

though the damage to fruit is unsightly, and probably does not taste very good, to the best of our knowledge, the enzymes injected will not negatively affect the health of a human.

Dear Mr. Marlos,
Thank you so very much for your VERY quick reply!  You’re the first person to commit to any other reply than, ” I don’t know”.
I feel much better about preparing my family a Stuffed Pepper dinner, with a salad containing raw peppers.
What do you know about “Anthracnose” fungus on Bell Pepper leaves? I know that’s not a bug, and I see NO lesions on the peppers
like I see in all the photos that I’ve researched online.  The small damage is only on the leaves and maybe a tiny bit on a mark
on a very few of the peppers.
I probably have no right to ask you about fungi, but all I get everywhere else is “I don’t know”. If you do not, I figured it couldn’t
hurt to ask, could it?      Sorry if it is…
Again, I thank you so very much—you’re the best!!!
Diane Huff

Hi Diane,
We actually gave you a very quick response without any research, and now we feel we need to remedy that.  We hunted our archives to find appropriate images to illustrate your questions since you did not provide any images.  We can tell you that we personally have eaten pomegranates that fed Leaf Footed Bugs, and we did not suffer any ill effects, though we did not eat the parts of the fruit that looked bad, dried out and generally unappetizing.  We have been buying oranges that are eerily dry in some parts, and we suspect that Leaf Footed Bugs might be the cause, but since we just juice the oranges, and we don’t have to eat the dried parts, other than getting less juice from an orange, we haven’t noticed a difference in flavor.
  We don’t know anything about the fungus, but perhaps one of our readers will comment.

 

Amy Gosch, Kyla Gunter Gatlin, MaryBeth Kelly, Michelle Ramsey Pedersen liked this post
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Subject: Borer Beetle??
Location: central New Hampshire
October 5, 2014 11:40 am
These beetles come into our house as the weather starts to get colder here in New England. Not sure how they get in. They are approx. 1-2 inches in length. I catch and release them back outside. My wife worries they are harmful to some of the native trees. What is this and is it a destructive critter?
Signature: bugged in NH

Western Conifer Seed Bug

Western Conifer Seed Bug

Dear bugged in NH,
Your description of this Western Conifer Seed Bug is accurate.  When the weather begins to cool, Western Conifer Seed Bugs often enter homes to hibernate, and though they can be a nuisance, they will not damage the home, its furnishings or its inhabitants.  The Western Conifer Seed Bug is native to the Pacific Northwest, but in the 1960s, due to a variety of factors that might include climate change and human travel patterns, the Western Conifer Seed Bug increased its range to include all of North America except the southeast.  The Western Conifer Seed Bug feeds upon “sap from green cones, twigs, seed pulp, and sometimes needles of Pinaceae (pines, hemlock, spruce, Douglas-fir)” according to BugGuide, but they do not harm the trees themselves.

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Subject: Squash Bug family?
Location: Bucerias, MX
September 30, 2014 2:11 pm
I’ve spent several hours online doing my due diligence before asking for help. Help!
Signature: Freda

Flag Footed Bug from Mexico

Flag Footed Bug from Mexico

Dear Freda,
This magnificent insect is a Flag Footed Bug,
Anisocelis flavolineata, and it is in the same family as the Squash Bugs, Coreidae.  Here is an image of a Flag Footed Bug on iNaturalist.  Your image is quite lovely, which is why we have decided to feature it as the Bug of the Month for October, 2014.

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Subject: Colourful bugs from South Mexico
Location: South Mexico – jungle
September 23, 2014 5:09 am
Further to my previous email I wondered if you could identify this very colourful bug? I have tried but to no avail. Searching for Mexican insects almost always leads to sites about eating them. I imagine these are probably found in parts of the US as well but I have been unsuccessful none the less. This type of bug is completely beyond my normal range of knowledge… it kind of looks like a really fat leaf-footed/assassin hybrid!
Any ideas?
Signature: Long time avid WTB reader

Immature Giant Mesquite Bugs from Mexico

Immature Giant Mesquite Bugs from Mexico

Dear Long time avid WTB reader,
These colorful nymphs are immature Giant Mesquite Bugs in the genus
Thasus.  Interestingly, this is an edible species and we are surprised you didn’t find it on the edible sites you searched.  There is a North American species of Giant Mesquite Bug that is found primarily in Arizona.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Beetle on a bamboo plant
Location: Singapore
September 1, 2014 6:23 am
I’ve been visited by these beetles around August. Three years ago, I snapped a photo of them mating. Just the other day, I took a picture of one laying eggs.
Could you tell me more about them?
Signature: Lee Yew Moon

Mating Leaf Footed Bugs

Mating Leaf Footed Bugs

Dear Lee Yew Moon,
These are not beetles.  These look like Leaf Footed Bugs in the family Coreidae to us, but we cannot provide a species name for you.  We did find a very similar looking Leaf Footed Bug from Singapore on AllExperts.

Leaf Footed Bug laying Eggs

Leaf Footed Bug laying Eggs

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination