Currently viewing the category: "Leaf Footed Bugs"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Colorful Bug
Location: richmond heights ohio
January 24, 2016 10:17 pm
On the bed, January, in Ohio,
Should I be looking for exterminator?
Signature: letter?

Western Conifer Seed Bug

Western Conifer Seed Bug

In our opinion, in this case an exterminator is a waste of money.  Western Conifer Seed Bugs like the one in your image are native to the Pacific Northwest, but in the 1960s, perhaps due to a major increase in travel, the species greatly expanded its range, now being found in most of North America and most recently being reported from Europe as well.  Western Conifer Seed Bugs frequently enter homes to hibernate when the weather cools.  They will not damage your home or its furnishings and they pose no threat to you or your pets.  They can be an annoyance if they enter homes in great numbers, but they are not breeding indoors.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Swarming on beach morning glory
Location: Wellington, Florida
December 24, 2015 2:50 pm
Dear Bugman,
There is a crowd of these bugs swarming on our only beach morning glory plant (Ipomoea imperati) here in western Palm Beach County, Florida. The plant looks peaked and is starting to turn yellow. What are these bugs, and are the bugs to blame? Will they move on to other plants after they are done with the morning glory?
Thank you!
Signature: Helen

Giant Sweet Potato Bug Nymphs

Giant Sweet Potato Bug Nymphs

Dear Helen,
We are sorry about the delay, but you wrote during the time we were out of the office for two weeks and we are still catching up on old mail.  These appear to be Giant Sweet Potato Bug nymphs,
Spartocera batatas, based on this BugGuide image.  The individual in that image were also on morning glory in Florida.  Though BugGuide notes:  “native to the Neotropics (West Indies to so. Brazil), adventive in our area (FL)” and “first reported in the continental US: FL 1995,” there is no mention of food plants, so we cannot say if they will move to other plants.  Featured Creatures has much more information including:  “A large colony of Spartocera batatas (Fabricius) was found in late June 1995 on an Asian cultivar of sweet potatoes (Ipomoea batatas) in Homestead, Florida, by Lynn D. Howerton, environmental specialist, Division of Plant Industry (DPI). The plants were badly damaged by the insects. That collection represented the first report of S. batatas in the continental U.S. Subsequent surveys of commercial fields of sweet potatoes in the area failed to turn up any more S. batatas. However, an additional single specimen was found in Miami in early October 1995 by DPI Inspector Ramon A. Dones. Many bugs were found in suburban Miami by Julieta Brambila (University of Florida, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences) in late September 1996.”  The following food plants are also mentioned:  “The most important host of S. batatas appears to be sweet potato, after which it was named. Other hosts listed in the literature include Solanaceae [tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum), eggplant (Solanum melongena var. esculentum), potato (Solanum tuberosum), and Solanum nigrum], Lauraceae [avocado (Persea americana)] and Rutaceae (Citrus spp.) (Ravelo 1988, Martorell 1976, Alayo 1967, Barber 1939, Wolcott 1923). Observations in Florida indicate that S. batatas adults sometimes disperse in high numbers. Thus, transient adults could be collected on a wide variety of plants. It is not known which of the above host records represent breeding populations.”

Dear Daniel,
Thank you – this information is very helpful. I have been picking them off because the morning glory is at the edge of our vegetable garden and we found more of the nymphs on the other side of the garden. We also have an avocado tree nearby so we don’t want to take any chances that they might spread further.
I appreciate your response.
Helen

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Kissing Bug?
Location: North central Ohio
December 27, 2015 7:16 pm
Hello. I have seen several of these bugs in my house and to me from what I could find on the internet it is a “kissing” bug. I’m hoping that it’s not seeing what I have read about them. My brother-in-law looked at the photo too and he seems to think that it isn’t.
If you could help me identify it It would be greatly appreciated!
Signature: Thank you, Pat

Western Conifer Seed Bug

Western Conifer Seed Bug

Dear Pat,
This is a Western Conifer Seed Bug, NOT a Kissing Bug.  We have been getting regular requests from folks who are making the same mistake, due in large part to media coverage on Kissing Bugs with misidentifications that is leading to internet hysteria.  The Western Conifer Seed Bug is an annoyance when it enters homes to hibernate over the winter, but it poses no threat to people, pets or homes.

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What in the world is this?
Location: Ohio
December 12, 2015 9:47 am
Found this bug on my screen door- live in a rural area of Ohio. Has been in the 40’s for a few days but has recently warmed to the 60’s today. Along with all the flies coming out, I saw this. It is overcast and slightly rainy today. We near open farm fields, have a small pond, creek and small woods.
Signature: Jen

Western Conifer Seed Bug

Western Conifer Seed Bug

Dear Jen,
As winter sets in, our identification requests for Western Conifer Seed Bugs increase as they seek shelter from the cold weather by coming indoors.  This year much media coverage on Kissing Bugs has caused many folks to write us to clarify the identity of Western Conifer Seed Bugs that superficially resemble Kissing Bugs.

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: unknown ant/spider
Location: Sydney, Australia
December 14, 2015 2:09 am
Hi
These were found on my front verandah about to crawl into my daughters bedroom.
Never seen them before. Tiny in size so babies or just hatched – maybe quarter of an inch or half a centimetre long.
It’s summer here in Australia anf I live about 2km west of the harbour.
Would love to know what you think they are.
Kind regards
Signature: Michelle

Heteropteran Hatchlings

Heteropteran Hatchlings

Dear Michelle,
These are hatchling True Bugs in the suborder Heteroptera, and we have not been able to quickly locate any matching images online, but we suspect they are in the Leaf Footed Bug or Twig Wilter family Coreidae.  Perhaps one of our readers will be able to assist in the identification.  We will be postdating your submission to go live during our absence from the office during the holidays.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Kissing bug?
Location: San Diego, CA
December 13, 2015 3:49 pm
Found this wee beastie in my back yard in Southern California some time ago. With all the media attention on kissing bugs it made me wonder if that was what I caught….and if that means there could be more lurking outside. Should I be worried?!
Signature: BH

Western Conifer Seed Bug

Western Conifer Seed Bug

Dear BH,
In the past several weeks, we have received around 50 requests to identify suspected Kissing Bugs and not one of the submitted images was of a Kissing Bug.  The Western Conifer Seed Bug, like the one in your image, is the most frequent suspect, followed by the Wheel Bug.  Kissing Bugs are known to spread Chagas Disease, but none of their impostors pose any threat to humans.  We are postdating your submission to go live to our site during our holiday absence.

Thank you!  Didn’t think it was but figured it was worth asking. Appreciate it.
Cheers
Blair

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination