Currently viewing the category: "Lace Bugs"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Corythucha species in so cal?
Location: Deukmejian Wilderness Park, La Crescenta, California 91214
March 28, 2014 10:49 pm
Hello,
I have been recently photographing a species of Lace Bug (Corythucha) for a biology project that I cannot identify. I have found these solely on the Thick-leaf Yerba Santa (Eriodictyon crassifolium) and observed clusters of the nymphs as well (which I have included in the photos). The adults seemed to be exhibiting some maternal care and am very curious to find out what species I have been observing as this is the only population I have been able to find in this area. I have collected these photos from Deukmejian Wilderness Park in La Crescenta, CA 91214 in the Alluvial community at an elevation of 2500 ft. I will greatly appreciate any information you can lend to me, thank you for your time.
Signature: Travis Farwell

Lace Bug

Lace Bug

Hi Travis,
You might want to try posting these images to BugGuide as well because we are a bit leery of providing an exact species identification on Lace Bugs which are quite similar in appearance.  For now, we are posting your excellent images in the hope that one of our readers can provide additional information.

Lace Bug Nymphs

Lace Bug Nymphs

Thank you for your help Daniel, I will be posting to BugGuide shortly.

Let us know if you get a definitive identification.

Lace Bug

Lace Bug

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bug
Location: Nashville, TN area
June 15, 2013 2:57 pm
Slightly larger than a fruit fly, found near a small lake in the summer
Signature: J. Jones

Lace Bug

Lace Bug

Dear J. Jones,
Though your photo is quite blurry, the outline of this Lace Bug in the family Tingidae is quite distinctive.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bug on sunflowers
Location: Southern Nevada
May 19, 2013 10:19 pm
I have a bunch of these bugs showing up on my sunflowers in my garden. I live in Boulder City Nevada, which sits right on the border of Arizona and Nevada, about 30 miles south of Las Vegas. They appeared about a week ago, so the middle of May. I just want to know if they are harmful, helpful or neutral to my garden.
Signature: Rich

Chrysanthemum Lace Bugs

Chrysanthemum Lace Bugs

Hi Rich,
Your sunflower has Lace Bugs in the family Tingidae.  Lace Bugs are True Bugs and they do not bite nor chew leaves, but rather they use their piercing and sucking mouthparts to draw nourishment from the plant fluids.  Normally we don’t attempt to identify Lace Bugs to the species level, and your photo is lacking in the type of essential detail for such an identification, however, since you provided a food plant, we gave it a shot and we believe you have Chrysanthemum Lace Bugs,
Corythucha marmorata, which according to BugGuide commenter L. T. Miller are:  “Common in many composite flowers.”  According to the University of Illinois College of Agricultural, Consumer and Environmental Sciences (ACES) website:  “Chrysanthemum lace bugs feed on asters, sunflowers, and goldenrods, injuring the plant by their piercing and sucking. The excrement is strategically placed along the vein and secures the eggs to the leaf.  They prefer the underside of the leaf but will also colonize the upper side when the population is high. Nymphs are small and shiny brown, and they suck sap. Young nymphs congregate on the underside of the leaves. In dry weather, high populations can cause particularly severe damage.  Hover-fly larvae, lady beetles, and lace-wing larvae will prey on these garden pests. Daily water sprays can be highly effective at reducing the population. U of I Extension suggests treating plants with horticulture oil, insecticidal soap, neem oil, or imidacloprid.” 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Whats this bug?
Location: Kennebunk, ME
August 10, 2012 10:26 am
Hello,
I am trying to help a friend identify this flying insect. Any ideas? Thanks
Signature: Waylon Holbrook

Azalea Lace Bug

Hi Waylon,
This is a Lace Bug, and we believe it matches this photo of an Azalea Lace Bug from Bugguide.  The species is native to east Asia.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Bugs in our bushes
Location: Chattanooga, TN
September 17, 2011 12:26 pm
My wife found these bugs when she was trimming our bushes. They bit her and were very painful. I have never seen these insects before. To me, they look like tiny formula 1 racecars. They were very small.
Signature: RalphyZ

Lace Bug

Dear RalphyZ,
You have Lace Bugs in the family Tingidae.  There are many similar looking species, but your individual looks close to the Hawthorn Lace Bug,
Corythucha cydoniae pictured on bugGuide.  The information page for the family on BugGuidesays nothing about them biting, but it does indicate they “Feed mainly on leaves of trees and shrubs, causing yellow spotting and sometimes browning and death of the leaves.”  Many plant feeding Hemipterans are capable of biting humans since they have mouths designed for piercing and sucking, however, most of these True Bugs and other Hemipterans do not feed off of humans.

Lace Bugs

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Bug
Location: Stanford, Ky (cntrl)
July 3, 2011 3:44 pm
These weird creatures are all around our porch. We cant even sit outside, because there are so many of them. Please tell us what we have here. They look intimidating for their size.The first and third pictures are of the underside. Thank you for your help.
Signature: Thank you, C.Willmon

Lace Bug

Dear C.,
This appears to be a Lace Bug in the family Tingidae.  There is not enough detail in your photo for us to determine the species.  According to BugGuide, Lace Bugs : “Feed mainly on leaves of trees and shrubs, causing yellow spotting and sometimes browning and death of the leaves.”  You should inspect the plants around your porch to determine which tree or shrub has been infested.  You can try spraying the leaves with a strong jet of water on a daily basis to rid the tree of immature insects that will not be able to fly back.  IN a short time, you should be able to control the infestation, but it takes diligence.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination