Currently viewing the category: "Assassin Bugs"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bug id
Location: Sydney australia
January 26, 2016 10:29 pm
I was bitten/stung by this not long ago in Sydney and was wondering what it is and what issues that come with the bite if any hurt like hell at the time has settled not buy is still painful 20 mins later. As u can see in the photos 3 stings in a row across a short area
Signature: Thanks Mark

Assassin Bug

Assassin Bug

Dear Mark,
This is an Assassin Bug and its aposomatic or warning coloration is appropriate.  There is not enough detail in your image to make a definite species ID.  This might be a Ground Assassin Bug, but a quick glance at Brisbane Insects reveals that there are many red and black Assassin Bugs in Australia.  Your individual appears to be wingless, and it might be a wingless species or it might be an immature nymph.  Some species of Assassin Bugs are more inclined to bite than others, and Assassin Bugs in the genus
Triatoma, known as Kissing Bugs, feed on the blood of warm blooded creatures, including humans.

Assassin Bug

Assassin Bug

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bug on Japanese Blueberry tree
Location: LOUISIANA
January 24, 2016 5:23 pm
What is this bug on my Japanese Blueberry tree? The tree also has the sooty mold. What should I do about this?
Signature: Denise Arsenaux

Milkweed Assassin Bugs

Milkweed Assassin Bugs

Dear Denise,
These are Milkweed Assassin Bugs,
Zelus longipes, both winged adults and wingless nymphs, and they are a beneficial predatory species that will help keep your tree free of insect pests.  Your image, which we have cropped closer into several different views, documents an aggregation which is quite unusual.  Generally, especially when they are adults, Assassin Bugs are solitary hunters.  They must have found something to feed upon on your tree, perhaps Aphids or some other plant feeding pest.  That pest may be contributing to the sooty mold problem.  You can compare your Milkweed Assassin Bugs to those depicted in the images posted to BugGuide.

Milkweed Assassin Bugs

Milkweed Assassin Bugs

Milkweed Assassin Bug

Milkweed Assassin Bug

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Red eggs?
Location: Wahroonga, NSW, Australia
January 20, 2016 8:54 pm
Hey there,
I work in bush regeneration near the headwaters of the Lane Cove River in NSW. We’re in a fairly rainy sort of area.
One of my colleagues sent me this picture of what appear to be red insect eggs. I searched through your egg posts for several pages, but the closest thing to these seemed to be ladybeetle eggs, however those are only yellow.
Unfortunately I don’t know what plant these eggs have been laid on. It actually looks like a weed.
Cheers :)
Signature: Frances

Possibly Phasmid Eggs

Assassin Bug Eggs

Dear Frances,
Eggs can be very difficult to properly identify.  The color looks like an exact match and the general shape is very close to this egg cluster pictured on Getty Images that is identified as a clutch of Stick Insect or Phasmid eggs.  We have not been able to locate any other corroborating images.

Update:  Assassin Bug Eggs
Thanks to a comment from Cesar Crash, we researched Assassin Bug Eggs and we found this image that exactly matches on FlickR.  No particular species is identified, but the eggs were found in Australia.  BunyipCo supports that ID.  Assassin Bugs are beneficial predators.

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Caught a Bug in Home
Location: South Jakarta, DKI Jakarta, Indonesia (island of Java)
January 8, 2016 8:41 am
Not sure what this bug is. Came home after dinner to find it sticking on a wall. Caught it and placed it inside a plastic container. Plan to release it soon, just curious what it is.
Pretty small, I estimate no more than 4 centimeters.
Thanks a bunch! Really curious!
Signature: Guy in Java

Kissing Bug

Kissing Bug

Dear Guy in Java,
This sure looks like a Kissing Bug in the genus
Triatoma to us.  Kissing Bugs are in the news in the U.S. lately because they are known to spread a virus that causes Chagas Disease, especially in Latin America.  We didn’t know if there were reports of Kissing Bugs in Indonesia, so we did some research.  Though we cannot read what it says, the Blognya Mbak Widha (BMW) site does have an image of a Kissing Bug.  A scholarly article, The Rising Importance of Triatoma rubrofasciata indicates the species has spread to Viet Nam.  Thanhnien News states:  “Kissing bugs, so called because they tend to bite (and defecate) on the victims’ faces and lips, are moving from the jungle into residential areas in Vietnam in large numbers.”  The Vectors of Chagas Disease indicates at least two species, Triatoma leopoldi and Triatoma pugasi, are found in Indonesia, though it is uncertain if Old World species carry the virus.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Scary looking
Location: South Western PA
January 10, 2016 1:18 am
found this in my dining room today. Looked like it was covered in sand or something. Exterminated for lack of knowledge of it. What is it?
Signature: -PA Matt

Masked Hunter

Masked Hunter

Dear PA Matt,
Though it is highly likely that a Masked Hunter like the one you found might bite if it is carelessly handled, it is nonetheless considered to be a beneficial predator.  Masked Hunters are frequently found in the home, and the common name is due to the fact that the sticky exoskeleton causes debris to stick, effectively masking the insect and helping it to blend in among its surroundings.  Another common name is Masked Bed Bug Hunter, and this predator has no problem feeding on Bed Bugs and other unwanted household pests.  Hopefully that information will cause you to be more tolerant in the future.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Location: Panama, Central America
Daniel/Bill: December 17th, 2015 9am, Boquete, Chiriqui Highlands, Panama (4,250’)
Here’s another, not so unusual but the area is thick with good sightings right now!
???????????? 2”
Regards
Clare Taylor

Wheel Bug

Wheel Bug

Hi again Clare,
This is a Wheel Bug in the genus
Arilus.  Our only North American species, Arilus cristatus, which ranges into Central America, does not have red legs, so we researched if this might a different species.  We then located an image on FlickR of a red legged species from Chiriqui, Panama, Arilus carinatus, so that is a good candidate for your individual.  Naturalista lists it as also occurring in Brazil.  Please use our standard submission form for any future submissions.
P.S.  Bill only assists us with moth identifications.

Thanks Daniel! Will do the form if I come across any more amazing creatures. Thanks for the site links. Felice Navidad!
Clare Taylor

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination