Currently viewing the category: "Assassin Bugs"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Wheel bug, shortly before relocation
Location: Dayton, OH
August 25, 2015 8:11 pm
I moved this guy to an area not frequented by kids, right after a short “look but don’t touch” speech. :) We seem to see a lot of these in late August, usually after a storm.
Signature: Amorette

Wheel Bug

Wheel Bug

Dear Amorette,
The presence of significant numbers of Wheel Bugs in your area is indicative of a plentiful food supply.  Wheel Bugs are stealth hunters that move slowly along plants searching for prey, and because of their hunting style, they tend to encounter foliage and blossom eating insects, including the invasive, exotic Japanese Beetle. Because of your thoughtfulness in relocating this magnificent predator, we are tagging this posting with the Bug Humanitarian Award.

Thank you so much!   I think that it’s better for everyone involved that I relocated it :)   I’ve heard horrifying things about the bites of wheel/assassin bugs.
Amorette

Marcie Reynolds, Dorinda Hogue Troutman, Mike Coughlin, Brooklynn Claire, Aundrea Murillo-Faynik, Kimberly Wochele, Megan Rivera-Franceschi, Ellyn Del Corso Campbell, Marieke Bruss, Sue Dougherty, Jessica M. Schemm liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Found near small backyard pond
Location: Pennsylvania
August 23, 2015 8:17 am
We found this creature crawling out of the rocks surrounding our small backyard pond. It moved in a very strange way. We live in PA. Thank you!!
From,
Owen (age 4) and Warren (age 3), nature enthusiasts
Signature: Owen and Warren

Wheel Bug

Wheel Bug

Dear Owen and Warren,
We are happy to learn that you are developing a love of nature at an early age.  This is a predatory Wheel Bug, the largest North American Assassin Bug.  Though backyard ponds serve as habitat for a wide variety of creatures, Wheel Bugs have no particular connection to a watery environment.  Wheel Bugs are often found on trees and plants where they search for prey.

Wheel Bug

Wheel Bug

Angela Ellis, Dan Welser Jr, Hayley Nasman, Jessica M. Schemm liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Strange beetle
Location: Just south of Spokane between Spokane-Cheney road and the 195
August 19, 2015 8:16 pm
I’ve never seen a beetle like this before. I found it on the wall in my house. It’s coloring very closely matched the wall, and before I saw it move, I thought it might just be a left over exoskeleton because it looked so porous and the abdomen was very thin. It almost looked as though it had a sprayed on coating.
Signature: Thomas

Masked Hunter

Masked Hunter

Dear Thomas,
This is a Masked Hunter and it is not a beetle.  This immature Assassin Bug has a sticky exoskeleton that attracts dust and debris, effectively camouflaging the Masked Hunter in its surroundings.  Masked Hunters have adapted to life with humans.  They might bite if carelessly handled, but they are effective predators.

Sue Dougherty, Andrea Leonard Drummond, Melissa Covey liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Help please.
Location: Miami, Florida
August 11, 2015 9:27 am
I have a lot of these bugs on my Lemon tree, and I was wondering what they were? I took these pictures myself. I appreciate a response from you. Thank you for the hard work you do.
Signature: No signature required

Milkweed Assassin Bug

Milkweed Assassin Bug

You have no cause for concern as your lemon tree is in good hands.  This is a predatory Milkweed Assassin Bug, Zelus longipes, and it will help keep your lemon tree free of agricultural pests.  Though your individual does not have the typical black markings associated with the Milkweed Assassin Bug, we found a matching image on BugGuide, also from Florida, that may indicate individuals from Florida are more orange than black.

Sue Dougherty, Kimberly Stephenson liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What the heck is this
Location: Hamilton, Ontario
August 9, 2015 3:54 pm
My friend was out for a walk and felt something on her neck. When she brushed it away, it bit her.
What the heck is it?
Signature: Ken

Ambush Bug

Ambush Bug

Dear Ken,
This is a predatory Jagged Ambush Bug, and like most other Assassin Bugs, it might bite if carelessly handled, but the bite is not considered dangerous.  The best way to remove an insect that might bite or sting if it is found crawling on a person is to gently blow it off with a strong exhalation.

Sue Dougherty, Jenny Roberts, Tonya Engel, Ann Levitsky, Erin Sullivan liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Colorado bee eater
Location: Front range colorado
August 7, 2015 6:17 pm
Hi. We were loving this flowering bush and so were the honeybees. Unfortunately tonight we noticed lots of dead bees and lots of these insects- can’t find them online anywhere! They blend right in- look like dried up flowers.
Signature: Bonnie

Ambush Bug eats Honeybee

Ambush Bug eats Honeybee

Dear Bonnie,
When we first saw your subject line, we thought you were submitting images of one of the large, predatory Robber Flies in the genus
Mallophora, possibly the Belzebul Bee Eater.  Your Food Chain image is just as exciting.  This is an Ambush Bug in the genus Phymata, probably a Jagged Ambush Bug.

Thank you, Daniel.  Very cool!  Feel bad for the bees though 😉

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination