Currently viewing the category: "True Bugs"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: 4 legged aquatic “Walking Stick”bug?
Location: Concord, MA
August 21, 2016 7:29 pm
While kayaking along the Concord River (Concord, MA) on August 21, 2016 I encountered this 4 legged insect atop a clump of decaying, floating weeds. At first the thought of a “Walking Stick” came to mind. But upon closer examination noticed the 4 legs (4 legs?). It was also about 4 inches long (body). Definitely not a Walking Stick! So what is this bug? I apologize for the picture qualities as I was moving (wind/current) and trying to capture this insect with a telephoto lens in a macro attempt.
Signature: dpsrams

Water Scorpion

Water Scorpion

Dear dpsrams,
This unusual aquatic insect is a Water Scorpion in the genus
Ranatra.  Though only four of the legs are used for walking, the front pair of legs are raptorial, and they are used to capture and hold small aquatic creatures while the Water Scorpion sucks the life sustaining fluids from the body of the prey.  Water Scorpions are also capable of flying from pond to pond which comes in handy if conditions cause one pond to dry out.

Water Scorpion

Water Scorpion

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this
Location: Florida orlando
August 19, 2016 3:32 pm
Found it in Orlando
Signature: K webb

Exuvia of a Masked Hunter

Cicada Exuvia, NOT Exuvia of a Masked Hunter

Dear K Webb,
This is the exuvia or cast off exoskeleton of a Masked Hunter.  All insects molt or shed their skins, and the remains are called the exuvia.  The Masked Hunter is a predatory Assassin Bug often found in homes.  The immature Masked Hunter has a sticky exoskeleton that attracts dust and debris, very effectively masking it in its surrounding.  When it molts, the Masked Hunter leaves behind its exuvia, and it is naked until more dust and debris sticks to it.  Though they may bite if carelessly handled, Masked Hunters are harmless.

 

Update:  Cicada Exuvia
Thanks to the readers who wrote in.  We retract our original identification.  We should look more closely in the future.  Our eyes were playing tricks on us.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this bug?
Location: San Fernando Valley, CA
August 19, 2016 9:23 am
Dear Mr. Bugman,
I found a lot of this bugs in on the wall coming up from the ground in my backyard. I normally do not see them. What is it?
Signature: Ken

Mediterranean Red Bug

Mediterranean Red Bug

Dear Ken,
The Mediterranean Red Bug,
Scantius aegyptius, is an invasive species that was accidentally introduced into Southern California recently.  We first found an individual in our Mount Washington, Los Angeles office grounds two years ago, but luckily we have not found another.  According to BugGuide:  “native to the Mediterranean, adventive in NA (first found 2009); established in so. CA.”  According to the Center for Invasive Species Research:  “Recently, another brightly colored, mostly seed feeding bug belonging to the family Pyrrhocoridae or ‘Red Bugs’ has become established in southern California and is drawing attention due to large aggregations of the bright red and black nymphs and adults feeding on annual broadleaf weeds in open space areas.  Scantius aegyptius, an old world pyrrhocorid bug, native to the eastern Mediterranean region, was documented for the first time in North America in Orange County during June of 2009.  Reports of this insect from other southern California locations (i.e., Riverside County) suggest that this insect has been established for a year or more prior to these Orange County collections.”  The site also states:  “Damage: The literature contains very little information regarding the biology of S. aegyptius and Scantius species in general are not considered to be economically important species.  In California, Scantius has been observed feeding on the developing seeds and stems of Knotweed (Polygonum spp.) and Malva (Malva parviflora).  It is likely that S. aegyptius will feed on the seeds of several species of annual herbaceous plants.  The most noticeable impact of S. aegyptius in California will likely be the presence of large numbers of nymphs and adults migrating from drying annual weeds into adjacent developed areas.  These migrations consisting of thousands of individuals can be very conspicuous and lead to large aggregations on small patches of host plants causing concern to local residents who notice these obvious aggregations.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: bug
Location: United States
August 17, 2016 11:34 pm
Sir I am 8 months pregnant and would love to know what kind of bug has been on my mattress since I’ve been gone. I’m scared it’s bed bugs and I know I can’t afford to get rid of them. The small ones look like fleas, the big ones look like ticks. I had bug bites on my arms for awhile I just didn’t know it was from my mattress.
Signature: shayla price

Bed Bug

Bed Bug

Dear Shayla,
We are sorry to have to tell you that this is a Bed Bug.  The good news is that Bed Bugs do not spread diseases.  We would urge you to consult with a physician, but to the best of our knowledge, bites from a Bed Bug should not affect your unborn child.  Again, we are not medical experts, so you should check with a physician.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Weird Bug
Location: Schaefferstown, Lebanon County, Pennsylvania
August 17, 2016 7:53 pm
This bug was located in south central PA on a fruit farm. I have never seen a bug like this before. Any idea what it is?
Signature: Jeremy

Ambush Bug

Ambush Bug

Dear Jeremy,
This is a Jagged Ambush Bug in the genus
Phymata.  Ambush Bugs are predators that often sit camouflaged on blossoms where they await prey that they ambush and feed upon.  Unfortunately, they do not discriminate when feeding, eating both beneficial pollinating species as well as insects that are injurious to the plants.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bug ID required
Location: Tiny Marsh, Elmvale Ontario Canada
August 15, 2016 10:43 am
Not sure what I’ve got here. Is this mating behaviour or lunch?
Signature: Ken MacDonald

Mating Jagged Ambush Bugs

Mating Jagged Ambush Bugs

Dear Ken,
These are mating Jagged Ambush Bugs in the genus
Phymata, but what is interesting about the mating activity of Ambush Bugs is that it is occurring at the restaurant.  Ambush Bugs frequently sit on blossoms, where they are often quite well camouflaged, and they wait for insects to be attracted to the blossoms upon which time they are ambushed.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination