Currently viewing the category: "True Bugs"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Found scuttling across the back patio.
September 20, 2014

We identified this Red Bug on BugGuide as Scantius aegyptius.  We will attempt to capture an image tomorrow.

Red Bug

Red Bug

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: what’s this bug?
Location: southern california
September 18, 2014 5:24 pm
Found this critter on my front screen door. It’s been in the low 100’s for the past week. This is in Southern California, about 30 miles east of Los Angeles . I put him in a tiny jar overnight and opened the jar when I got home to photograph him; got two shots and he flew away. Is it some kinda moth? At first I was kinda freaked, thought it was a huge tick but then I saw he had only six legs legs so I calmed down….what is this thing!!
Signature: john roush

Brown Marmorated Stink Bug

Brown Marmorated Stink Bug

Dear John,
This is a Brown Marmorated Stink Bug, an Asian species that was first reported in Allentown, Pennsylvania in the late 1990s, and which has spread across much of eastern North America.  In recent years, Southern California sightings have become more frequent.  The Brown Marmorated Stink Bug is both an agricultural pest and a nuisance to the average person as it frequently enters homes to hibernate as the weather cools.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Red beetle (?)
Location: Nashville, TN
September 15, 2014 1:13 pm
Saw this guy in Nashville recently. Never have seen anything like this in thus region, its body shape is similar to what we call ‘stink bugs’.
Any thoughts?
Signature: Cpuryear

Florida Predatory Stink Bug

Florida Predatory Stink Bug nymph

Dear Cpuryear,
The reason this striking nymph reminds you of a Stink Bug is that it is a Stink Bug in the family Pentatomidae,
Euthyrhynchus floridanus, AKA Florida Predatory Stink Bug.  The specificity of the names, both common and scientific, belies the fact that the Florida Predatory Stink Bug naturally ranges far beyond the border of our southernmost state, according to BugGuide.  The Florida Predatory Stink Bug, which is called a Halloween Bug in its seasonal adult attire replete with wings, is an effective predator.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Makers Mark Beetle?
Location: Virginia Beach, VA
September 13, 2014 6:41 am
Hello!
I noticed this fella (or lady) pulling a moth up the wall of our front porch. At first glance I thought it might actually be a spider, but on closer inspection, it’s obviously some type of weevil or beetle. Up close, it genuinely appears to have been dipped in hot red wax, like the top of a well known bourbon whiskey. It’s obviously a hunter, given the activity in the photos. I would say this fella is approx 10-13mm long. Just curious, and thanks so much for this amazing site!
Signature: M Coughlin

Florida Predatory Stink Bug Nymph eats Moth

Florida Predatory Stink Bug Nymph eats Moth

Dear M Coughlin,
Your Maker’s Mark bourbon analogy is amusing and quite timely considering the link we located.  This is actually an immature Florida Predatory Stink Bug and they are very effective predators.  

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: BUG ID
Location: Rochester, NY
September 7, 2014 6:14 pm
Can you ID this bug which was found in our garage. Runs fast. Possibly soldier bug ?
Thank you,
Veronica
Signature: Veronica

True Bug, but which one???

Distorted image of Toe-Biter

Dear Veronica,
We wish your image had more detail.  We are relatively confident that this is a True Bug in the suborder Heteroptera, but at this time, we cannot provide any additional information.  It most closely resembles the Narrow Stink Bugs in the genus Mecidea that are pictured on BugGuide, but we do not believe that is a correct identification, especially as there are no sightings in the northeast.  Can you please tell us how large this insect was and also send additional images if you have any.  Meanwhile, we are going to seek a second opinion from Eric Eaton.

Eric Eaton provides an obvious ID
Daniel:
Kinda funny that it *ran* fast considering this is actually an aquatic insect that *swims* fast.  LOL!  This is a giant water bug in the genus Belostoma, family Belostomatidae.  They fly well and are sometimes attracted to lights at night.  Well, you know that already, and know they are also called “toe-biters.”
Eric

Interesting Eric.  We are no strangers to Toe-Biter identifications, and at first we thought this might be a Water Scorpion.  The image appears to be distorted, and that threw us off, combined with the “runs fast” comment.

Comment
This reminds me quite a bit of a Belostomatid, but it looks like a somewhat stretched picture. If you vertically compress the picture a little bit, it’s easier to see. Then again, it could be something completely different! I look forward to hearing what Mr Eaton says. The true bugs are my favorite group to work with, there’s always surprises.
sccabrian

Dear sccabrian,
You are correct.  See Eric’s response and our reply.

Hemipteran Corrected Perspective

Hemipteran Corrected Perspective

Ed. Note:  We feel really stupid because our first thought was aquatic bug, but it just did not look right.  We never suspected altered perspective.  Of the Toe-Biters in the genus Belostoma, BugGuide states much of fascination, including “overwinters as an adult; mating and egg laying occurs in late spring or early summer” and “Females cement their eggs to the backs of males, who swim with the eggs attached, providing aeration and protection until the eggs hatch.”  This is one of the few examples in the Insect Class where the presence of the male improves the chances of survival of the young, AKA paternal behavior.  We believe the male Sexton Beetles contribute to the care of the larvae.

Thank you Daniel. Unfortunately we have no other images. We think he is about an inch long +/- a bit. I know we are horrid
describers !

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What’s this bug?
Location: Denver
September 6, 2014 9:11 pm
Spotted this one in our kitchen. He seemed to closely match the color and texture of our light grey wall. Any guesses?
Signature: Chris

Masked Hunter

Masked Hunter

Hi Chris,
Better than a guess, we can assure you with 100% certainty that this is an immature Masked Hunter,
Reduvius personatus, a species of predatory Assassin Bug that has the unique ability to camouflage itself due to the stickiness of its exoskeleton that causes dust and debris to stick to the surface of the insect.  Nearly all reports we have of Masked Hunters are from household interiors, which causes us to believe that they have adapted to a life of cohabitation with humans, and since they will prey upon Bed Bugs and other undesirable household intruders, they are considered beneficial insects, though they might bite if provoked.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination