Currently viewing the category: "True Bugs"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: small insect with long front legs
Location: Greenville, SC
June 26, 2016 7:37 pm
Hello bugman! I saw this bug on my thai hot pepper plant today. It’s been quite hot outside lately. He was pretty still and he was the only one of his kind that I saw. I thought he was a pseudoscorpion at first, but I couldn’t find any that have the same markings, and I’m pretty sure he has antennae, as well.
Signature: ronnet sonnet

Spiny Assassin Bug Nymph

Spiny Assassin Bug Nymph

Dear ronnet sonnet,
This is a predatory, beneficial, Spiny Assassin Bug nymph in the genus
Sinea.  You can compare your image to this image on BugGuide.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bug invasion!
Location: Los Altos CA
June 27, 2016 5:42 pm
Hi bugman! I’m having a bit of a freak out here in Northern California (Los Altos), and hope you can help. There has been a sudden appearance of a large number of tiny black and tan bugs at my house. They seem to come from the foundation of the stucco house and swarm the walls and windows, and stream in through cracks in doors and windows! They show up in the late afternoon when it gets warm, and there are thousands and thousands of them, and then they disappear as it cools down in the evening. They don’t seem to fly, rather scurry along very quickly and seem to fall down from the wall if scared. They appear en masse on one wall one day and then will be greatly diminished in a day, but then appear along another wall a day or two later. We have had a drought here, so the ground is not damp, and they don’t look like the pictures of fungus-eating springtails I saw online. What could they be and what should I do to stop the invasion? Thank you so much for any guidance!
Signature: Disturbed by the force

Oh, I forgot to tell you about the size…they are tiny! Some are small like the size of a flea, and some are barely visible like the size of pepper. They also don’t fly, and don’t seem to bite, although I haven’t really given them a chance to try.
Thank you again!

Probably Dirt Colored Seed Bugs

Probably Dirt Colored Seed Bugs

Dear Disturbed by the force,
Your insects look identical to the ones in this two year old posting from Northern California that we identified as potentially Dirt Colored Seed Bugs in the family Rhyparochromidae. 

Probably Dirt Colored Seed Bugs

Probably Dirt Colored Seed Bugs

Hi Daniel,
Thank you very much for your help! Still quite disturbing to see those tiny dirt-colored seed bugs everywhere, but I am so glad to know what they are. I can now research them by name and see the best way to get rid of them.
Thank you again,
Elise

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Red and purple beetle
Location: SE Michigan
June 25, 2016 4:48 pm
Hi bugman!
I just noticed thousands of these guys hanging out in my backyard mostly around decorative grass and dry whirlybirds. They vary in size and amount of yellow and seem to like to clump together.
Signature: Lisa M

Boxelder Bug Nymphs

Boxelder Bug Nymphs

Dear Lisa M,
These are immature Eastern Boxelder Bugs,
Boisea trivittata.  Adults are winged.  Both adults and nymphs form large aggregations leading to popular names like Democrat Bugs or Populist Bugs.  According to BugGuide they feed on the seeds of the following trees:  “Acer grandidentatum (Bigtooth Maple), A. negundo (Boxelder), A. saccharinum (Silver Maple), A. buergerianum (Trident Maple), and Sapindus saponaria (Soapberry).”  You must have a nearby maple tree.  Boxelder Bugs do not harm the trees and they are not dangerous, but they can be a nuisance if they are too plentiful.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Red-Orange Bug Needs a Name
Location: Boca Raton, Florida
June 23, 2016 1:13 pm
Hello What’s That Bug!
Found a bunch of these little guys covering a tree at Yamato Scrub Natural Area in Boca Raton, Florida. The picture doesn’t do the bug justice – they are bright reddish-orange – really stand out in the woods! I’m not sure if this is a juvenile form or an adult form. I’m hoping you can give me a proper identification. As always, I enjoy your web site and appreciate the service you provide to us amateur naturalists!
Signature: Ann Mathews

Giant Milkweed Bug Nymph

Giant Milkweed Bug Nymph

Dear Ann,
This is an immature True Bug, and nymphs can often be very difficult to properly identify.  Most guide books only contain images of adult insects.  This Leaf Footed Bug in the family Coreidae is
Sephina gundlachii, also known as the Giant Milkweed Bug (not to be confused with the Large Milkweed Bug or the Small Milkweed Bug) and we identified it thanks to this image on BugGuide.  According to BugGuide, it feeds on climbing milkweed.  Only reported from Florida on BugGuide, this is only the second report we have received.  Perhaps you will be able to send us a nice image of a winged adult in the future.

Once again, What’s That Bug comes to the rescue and identifies an unknown creepy crawly for me. I’ll do my best to get a picture of an adult giant milkweed bug. If any of the photos look halfway decent I’ll be sure to send them your way. I always learn such interesting things every time I visit your web site. I can’t say that for too many web sites these days – so keep up the great work!
Ann Mathews
Palm Beach County
Department of Environmental Resources Management

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this bug
Location: LA-lower AL
June 24, 2016 7:07 am
What is this bug on my plants.
Signature: Helen

Milkweed Assassin Bug

Milkweed Assassin Bug

Dear Helen,
This is a beneficial, predatory Milkweed Assassin Bug, and it will help keep your plants free of phytophagous species.  We would urge you not to try to handle Milkweed Assassin Bugs as they are prone to biting if they feel threatened, though the bite is not dangerous and will produce little more than local swelling and irritation.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Swamp thing bug, some sort of weevil?
Location: Mississauga, Ontario
June 24, 2016 6:56 am
I was sweeping around my front door and I thought this was a ball of dirt or maybe a tiny crumpled ball of dead grass. Then it started moving! Slowly. I don’t know if I hurt it sweeping or that’s just how it moves to be camouflaged, but I pushed it onto a piece of cardboard and threw it back into the garden.
Signature: Beth

Masked Hunter

Masked Hunter

Dear Beth,
This stealth, camouflaged predator is an immature Masked Hunter.  They are sticky and they attract debris that helps to conceal them from both predators and prey.  Masked Hunters have adapted well to living indoors with humans, though we are quite confident your individual will be fine in your garden.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination