Currently viewing the category: "True Bugs"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: hemipteran nymph
Location: Valley View, South Australia
February 27, 2015 9:58 pm
I found thousands of tiny bugs climbing my back fence from the ground upwards this morning and wondered what they were. I took the attached micrograph using a USB microscope. The background grid is 5mm squares
Signature: Geoff Smith

Possibly Seed Bug Nymphs

Possibly Seed Bug Nymphs

Hi Geoff,
Since these Hemipterans are immature nymphs, they may be difficult to identify to the species or genus level.  We believe they are Dirt Colored Seed Bugs in the family Rhyparochromidae, and they do not look too dissimilar than these unidentified nymphs from Australia, and they also resemble these nymphs from California.
  Whenever a species appears in a heretofore new location, we suspect it may be an invasive, exotic, introduced species without natural predators.  The climate in California and Australia are similar enough that species from either location can easily adapt, so they may be native, or introduced, and since they look so similar to the California sighting, it is possible they are the same species, and that one or the other, or both, are introduced.

Many thanks Daniel
I agree with what you’ve said – interestingly the block behind my house has recently been cleared and the bugs are swarming all over the fences around this newly bare ground. They are all still there today and the ants don’t appear to like them, although I noted that a small spider had eaten just a few of them overnight. I accidentally squashed a few against my hand when I first noticed them and they smell unpleasant.
Regards
Geoff

Sue Dougherty, Amy Gosch, Jacob Helton, Alfonso Moreno, Andrea Leonard Drummond liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Cool Costa Rican Beetle
Location: Santa Elena, Costa Rica
February 25, 2015 7:59 am
We found this beetle at high elevations in Costa Rica (Santa Elena/Monteverde in February) I’ve looked around and can’t seem to find a picture to identify it. Can you help? It was found on a fence between cleared farmland and forest near an ant trail.
Signature: C Avilez

Spotted Shield Bug

Spotted Shield Bug

Dear C Avilez,
This is not a Beetle.  We quickly identified this Shield Bug in the family Scutelleridae as a Spotted Shield Bug,
Pachycoris torridus, thanks an image on FlickR.  Some of the variations in markings and coloration are pictured on Neotropical Entomology.

Fiona Cunningham Pausch, Sue Dougherty, Jacob Helton, Rick Smith, Amy Gosch, Kathleen O'Dwyer, Tom Wuest, William Boyd, Alfonso Moreno, Kathy Haines, Maria Horis, Andrea Leonard Drummond, Mary Fitzsimons, Terry Genesen Becker liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Grasshopper (?)
Location: South West WA
February 16, 2015 5:40 am
I have not seen this type of grasshopper (?) on my farm in 15 years – is it something ‘exotic’ or have I just been missing them?
I found two of them earlier today (Mon 16 Fed 2015) in a wisteria that is creeping over the fencing in my driveway entrance.
They seem to be able to fly quite well – and make quite a bit of noise doing it! The noise is what alerted me to their presence.
Thanks
Signature: John

Our Robo-Response
Thank you for submitting your identification request.
Please understand that we have a very small staff that does this as a labor of love. We cannot answer all submissions (not by a long shot). But we’ll do the best we can.

I have managed to identify the insect in the query I submitted earlier – it is a CRUSADER BUG

Crusader Bug

Crusader Bug

Dear John,
We are happy you identified your Crusader Bug prior to our response, and we are thrilled to be able to add a new Big Legged Bug or Leaf Footed Bug in the family Coreidae from Australia to our archives as our existing images of the species are all of immature nymphs.  More about the Crusader Bug,
Mictis profana, can be found on the Brisbane Insect website.

Jacob Helton, Alfonso Moreno liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: species of the bug
Location: West Malaysia
February 13, 2015 12:26 pm
Hello, I would be very thankful if anyone could tell me what is this bug, I found this red bug with a small red head and colorful yellow and black dots on the back next to my door (West Malaysia).
Signature: thank you

Red Bug

Red Bug

It is appropriate to refer to this insect as a Red Bug because it is a True Bug in the suborder Heteroptera and because it is red, and we believe it is also a member of the family Pyrrhocoridae, commonly called the Red Bugs.  This matching image on FlickR is in agreement with our supposition.  At this time, we cannot provide a more specific identification.

Red Bug

Red Bug

Alfonso Moreno, Kathy Haines liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Query of insect
Location: South West Rocks NSW
February 13, 2015 8:16 pm
Found this visitor in the garden at South West Rocks NSW and cant identify it. Can you help
Signature: Phil Young

Assassin Bug

Assassin Bug

Dear Phil,
This is a beneficial predatory Assassin Bug in the family Reduviidae, but we cannot find an exact visual match on the Brisbane Insect website.  Assassin Bugs should be handled with caution as they can deliver a painful bite. We found a close match on FlickR that is identified as the Common Assassin Bug,
Pristhesancus plagipennis.  The Common Assassin Bug is well represented on the Brisbane Insect Website, but the coloration looks different, so there may be regional variations, of something may be misidentified.

Assassin Bug

Assassin Bug

Thanks so much for the help with this. Not what I’d thought of. An always careful with insects and let them come and go. Glad to know it’s a beneficial predator. Again thank you. Phil

Alfonso Moreno, Sally Hodges liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Strange Bug
Location: Bogotá, 2.600 mts above sea level
February 8, 2015 10:24 pm
Dear Mr. Bugman,
I found these strange bugs in my garden, lots of them in a tree (Alcaparro in spanish). Nobody can tell me what kind of bugs they are, if harmful or poisonous. I live in Bogotá, Colombia. S.A. Will
you please tell me about it?
Thank you,
Signature: Silvia Riaño

Immature Giant Mesquite Bugs

Immature Giant Mesquite Bugs

Dear Silvia,
Though your image is blurry, we are pretty confident these are Giant Mesquite Bugs in the genus
Thasus.  They are not poisonous and we even received a report that they are edible.

Alisha Bragg liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination