Currently viewing the category: "True Bugs"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this bug
Location: Southern California
July 27, 2014 3:10 pm
We see this but a lot in our garden here in San Marino California., which is right next to Pasadena, CA. We would love to know what it is. Thank you!
Signature: Mirta

Large Milkweed Bug

Large Milkweed Bug

Dear Mirta,
We suspect you must have milkweed in your garden.  This is a Large Milkweed Bug,
Oncopeltus fasciatus, and it will feed on the seeds of milkweed, but otherwise does not harm the plant.  See BugGuide for more information on the Large Milkweed Bug.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Is this an assassin bug?
Location: Big Bend of Texas, Chihuahuan Desert
July 27, 2014 6:08 am
Thanks for all you folks do! I’m hoping you can help me identify what bug has been invading my house for the past couple weeks. We live in the Chihuahuan Desert, on the southwest edge of Texas. We have lots of interesting bugs, including the kissing bug called the conenose which can carry the parasite T. cruzi (causes Chagas disease).
The small bug that has been “blooming” lately resembles the conenose, but the body shape isn’t quite right and the sides are solid red, instead of striped. I’m hoping you will be able to identify this bug — and I’m also hoping it isn’t an assassin bug! We have been sweeping them up and tossing them outside daily, but it feels like bailing out the ocean!
Signature: Sara

Red Shouldered Bug

Red Shouldered Bug

Hi Sara,
The Red Shouldered Bug,
Jadera haematoloma, is a Scentless Plant Bug in the family Rhopalidae, not an Assassin Bug, so you do not have to worry about bites.  Though they are benign, they do have the habit of entering homes, sometimes in great numbers.  According to BugGuide, they are also called Goldenrain Tree Bugs, and perhaps you have a tree in your garden that is attracting them.  BugGuide states:  “Adults and larvae tend to feed in groups, and favor developing seeds and fruits of their favored hosts, but will also suck sap from foliage, flowers, buds, or oozing stems. They feed on a variety of plants primarily in and related to the family Sapindaceae. Favorites include Balloonvine (Cardiospermum species) and Goldenrain Tree (Koelreuteria sp.), both in Sapindaceae, and they regularly use Soapberry (Sapindus sp.; Sapindaceae) and Maple/Boxelder (Acer sp.; Aceraceae). Additionally, reported on a variety of other plants, especially feeding on fruit, including Chinaberry (Melia azedarach; Meliaceae), Fig (Ficus spp.; Moraceae), Althaea (Malvaceae), Plum, Cherry, & Peach (Prunus sp.; Rosaceae), Apple (Malus sp.; Rosaceae), Grape (Vitis sp.; Vitaceae), Ash (Fraxinus sp.; Oleaceae), etc. Adults sometimes gather around human food leftovers and other smashed insects to feed as well.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: underside of zucchini leaves
Location: northeast ohio
July 22, 2014 4:18 pm
A friend who runs a small busy found these on the underside of a leaf. This was today, so high summer. We want to know what this is and whether they will damage the pants
Signature: golly

Squash Bug Hatchlings

Squash Bug Hatchlings

Dear golly,
These are eggs and newly hatched Squash Bugs,
Anasa tristis, and there is on older, but still immature individual near the center of the group.  You can compare your image to this excellent series of images on BugGuide.  Squash Bugs will not damage your pants, but according to BugGuide:  “the most injurious coreid in FL causes wilting and blackening of leaves; can transmit cucurbit yellow vine disease.”  While they will not damage your pants, the are quite injurious to squash plants.  As you can see from the BugGuide Data page, they are not limited in range to Florida. 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this thing?
Location: Little Rock, AR
July 22, 2014 7:19 am
I found this in my back yard on a hollyhock while taking macro shots of bugs, and no one I know seems to know what it is. Legs of a cricket, body of a fly, wings of a wasp, head (and even mouth part) of any number of true bugs…we’re stumped.
Thanks so much! :)
Sincerely,
L.J.
Signature: L.J.

Scentless Plant Bug:  Niesthrea louisianica

Scentless Plant Bug: Niesthrea louisianica

Dear L.J.,
This is probably the finest image we have ever received of the Scentless Plant Bug,
Niesthrea louisianica, which does not have a common name.  According to BugGuide, it:  “Feeds on flower buds and seeds of plants in the Mallow family (Malvaceae), such as Hibiscus and Rose of Sharon.”

Daniel,
Thanks again!  We’re glad to have the mystery solved. :)
I have other bugs from all over my back yard I can’t identify, either, and some that I just can’t figure out the variety, if it’s okay to share them. Not because I want to show off the pictures, of course (though I certainly appreciate the compliment on the last one), but to see if y’all can tell me what they are.  I understand if you’re short on time, though. :)
Sincerely,
L.J.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What kind of beetle is this ?
Location: Victoria, BC Canada.
July 21, 2014 2:45 am
I took a picture and I would like to know what kind of beetle is in the picture?
Signature: Thank you, in advance.

Conchuela Stink Bug Nymphs

Conchuela Stink Bug Nymphs

These are not beetles.  They are immature Conchuela Stink Bugs.

Conchuela Stink Bug Nymphs

Conchuela Stink Bug Nymphs

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: assassin bug eating japanese beetle
Location: Hermann, Missouri
July 19, 2014 4:09 pm
stopped to close a gate and saw this. took about 30 pics in order to get one that was decent. sending in high rez. makes me really really happy that there are natural predators to the dang japanese beetles. not nearly enough of them, but still….
Signature: c. millard

Wheel Bug eats Japanese Beetle

Wheel Bug eats Japanese Beetle

Dear c. millard,
Thank you so much for sending in your excellent image of a Wheel Bug feeding on a Japanese Beetle, and we are certain it will warm the collective hearts of gardeners in the eastern portions of North America where the invasive, exotic Japanese Beetle feeds on hundreds of different ornamental garden plants and food crops.  According to our sources, Japanese Beetles were not a big problem in Ohio in 2014.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination