Currently viewing the category: "True Bugs"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bug on all my plants
Location: La Porte, Texas
July 23, 2016 7:29 am
I have these bugs on my plants. In some areas there are a mass of dozens. But only on my tomatoes and peppers plants.
Signature: I do care.

Milkweed Assassin Bug Nymph

Milkweed Assassin Bug Nymph

This is a Milkweed Assassin Bug nymph and they will help keep your vegetables free of Aphids and other insect pest.  They are a beneficial species in the home garden.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Unknown Insect
Location: Lincolnshire, England
July 23, 2016 7:01 am
This landed on my arm. I have no idea what is neither do the people on Reddit. It’s roughly half an inch big, I’m in Lincolnshire, England. It’s fully intact and it has wings. Help me indenting this.
Signature: Elliot Cutts

Possibly Unknown True Bug

Olympic Bug

Dear Elliot,
We might even be more confused about this critter’s identity than you are.  At first glance, we thought perhaps we were seeing a headless mantid because of the raptorial front legs, until we realized those were the antennae and there were three complete sets of green legs.  The antennae seem to be the best clue in your image for identification purposes, and our best guess at this time is that this might be a member of the True Bug suborder Heteroptera because according to BugGuide, True Bugs can be identified by:  “Antennae, when not hidden, have 4-5 segments.”  Also, some True Bugs have modified antennae like this North American Giant Mesquite Bug.  We have not had any luck locating anything remotely similar looking on the British Bugs Heteroptera page, nor have we had any luck locating anything similar looking on UK Safari.  It is possible we missed something, but we can’t help but to wonder if perhaps this is a recently introduced species, or an exotic rogue that just happened to have found its way to your arm. We have sought some professional assistance, and perhaps our readership will write in with suggestions.

Eric Eaton identifies Olympic Bug
Hi, Daniel:
I think it *is* native.  It is the “Olympic Bug,” Heterotoma planicornis, a type of mirid plant bug.  Here’s more about it:
http://www.britishbugs.org.uk/heteroptera/Miridae/heterotoma_planicornis.html
Cool critter, thanks for sharing!
Eric

According to British Bugs:  “The broad and flattened 2nd antennal segment, dark ground colour and contrasting greenish legs make this species unmistakeable.   Abundant throughout most of Britain on various plants and trees, in particular nettles. Both adults and the reddish nymphs feed on small insects as well as plant buds and unripe fruits.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Household insect with strange thick parts of legs
Location: New Jersey
July 22, 2016 11:21 pm
Hello,
I have seen these insects twice in my apartment in suburbia lately. One much smaller than this, about a centimeter long, and then this one, which was about 3 centimeters in length.
Sorry the photo is slightly blurry, but I hope you can see the shape. I know it’s not a roach, the back isn’t the right shape. I don’t think it’s a beetle. I am perplexed outside of that though: it has these thickenings near its joints in its legs that remind me of bees, and a head that reminds me of that, too, but it doesn’t have the hemiptera waist. My best guess is a true bug, but that’s pretty vague!
I tried to grab it so I could look at its mouth parts, but it intelligently moved away.
Signature: Sylvia

Long Necked Seed Bug

Long Necked Seed Bug

Dear Sylvia,
This is a Long Necked Seed Bug,
Myodocha serripes, a species that according to BugGuide:  “overwinters in woodlands, migrating to fields in spring/summer; adults attracted to lights” and “Sometimes a pest of strawberries.”  We love your dedication to learning its identity, including trying to see its mouth parts. 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What this bug?
Location: Tennessee
July 16, 2016 4:53 pm
We found this bug on my husbands cruiser. We live in OakRidge TN. The season of course is summer. He became very aggressive when caught and changed colors.
Signature: Christen T.

Leaf Footed Bug Nymph

Leaf Footed Bug Nymph

Dear Christen,
This is an immature Leaf Footed Bug in the genus
Acanthocephala, and you may compare your image to this BugGuide image.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Corsair or masked assassin?
Location: Vermont
July 16, 2016 9:23 pm
In Vermont…on my pillow…next to my face…please help me identify!
Signature: Rachael

Probably Masked Hunter

Probably Masked Hunter

Dear Rachael,
In our opinion, this looks more like an adult Masked Hunter than a Black Corsair.  If you compare your individual to this image of a Black Corsair on BugGuide, you see that the latter is a heavier bodied insect with more substantial sucking mouthparts and fleshy pads on the front legs.  The Masked Hunters on BugGuide have more slender legs like your individual.  Additionally, immature lint covered Masked Hunters are frequently found indoors, while Black Corsairs tend to be outdoor insects, though BugGuide indicates they are attracted to lights.  Though neither species is dangerous to humans, they do bite relatively readily if carelessly handled. 

Thank you so much for such a speedy response!  Your site is amazing.
Although now I feel paranoid about bed bugs as it seems the Masked Hunters seek those out…!
My very best,
Rachael

Yes, but they feed on other insects as well, and they will kill any Bed Bugs they find.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Busy milkweeds
Location: Columbus, Ohio
July 12, 2016 1:04 pm
So the milkweeds seem to be the water cooler of the insect world. We have monarchs, Japanese beetles, tons of bees (honey and bumbles), and these red mating things! Their flowers are a pretty color and they really have a pleasant and strong scent. I’m rather surprised that these weren’t grown on purpose before the whole monarch decline. Any way, were enjoying the show and hope to get a caterpillar or two.
Signature: Amber

Mating Large Milkweed Bugs

Mating Large Milkweed Bugs

Dear Amber,
There is indeed quite a robust ecosystem surrounding milkweed, which is one of the reasons we created a Milkweed Meadow tag on our site recently.  Monarch Butterflies need milkweed as it is the only food consumed by the Monarch Caterpillars.  Milkweed Borers and Milkweed Tussock Moth Caterpillars are other visitors you might expect in the future.  Your mating Large Milkweed Bugs are another species that depends upon milkweed.  Many pollinators like your Bumble Bees, numerous species of butterflies and many wasps including Tarantula Hawks (mostly in western states), while not dependent upon milkweed as a sole food, are attracted to the fragrant blooms that are laden with nectar.  We will attempt to identify your Bumble Bee species.  

Bumble Bees

Bumble Bees

Bumble Bee

Bumble Bee

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination