Currently viewing the category: "True Bugs"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Leaf Beetle?
Location: Trinity County, Ca. 1,500′ elev.
May 1, 2016 5:30 pm
We have an infestation of hundreds of beetles that are on our ash tree and lilac bush underneath it. They are very active in the late afternoon in the high 80’s and the ash tree is being defoliated. They are also working out on the lilac bush and it is becoming sickly looking. Looking at pictures they seem to resemble a leaf beetle but I’m no bug person. Can you help?
Signature: Larry Winter

Plant Bug:  Possibly Orthops scutellatus

Plant Bug: Possibly Western Tarnished Plant Bug

Dear Larry,
These are definitely NOT Beetles.  We believe they are Plant Bugs in the family Miridae.  It resembles
Orthops scutellatus based on this and other BugGuide images, but that species feeds on carrots and other Umbelliferae according to BugGuide.  Perhaps an even better match is the Western Tarnished Plant Bug, Lygus hesperus, which is also pictured on BugGuide.  According to BugGuide, it is “Widespread in the western North America in agricultural and relatively low elevation regions extending from southern BC to northern Mexico.”

Plant Bugs we believe

Plant Bugs we believe

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Is this a kissing bug?
Location: North Central Alabama
May 1, 2016 12:56 pm
We found this bug in our home in Alabama and are concerned that it might be a kissing bug. We would appreciate any information on what bug this is and if it is a kissing bug, what do we do to insure we don’t have any more in our home?
Signature: Alabama Fan

Kissing Bug

Kissing Bug

Dear Alabama Fan,
We have gotten numerous identification requests over the past year since there has been increased news coverage on Kissing Bugs and most have proven to be other species.  In your case, though your image lacks critical clarity, it appears that this really is an Eastern Blood-Sucking Conenose Bug or Kissing Bug,
Triatoma sanguisuga.   Tropical members of the genus are most likely to spread Chagas Disease, but BugGuide does note:  “Sometimes bites humans, and the bite may be severe, causing an allergic reaction.”  Insects can enter homes through open windows and doors, gaps in the frames of windows and doors, and cracks in the foundation.  You should do a thorough inspection to determine the likeliest places an insect might gain entry and seal those points.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this bug?
Location: South-West Michigan, 20 miles from Grand Rapids, Mi
May 1, 2016 2:05 pm
Hello!
Thank you for opening my message. I hope you’re having a wonderful day.
I just found a bug of sorts crawling on my tennis shoes inside my house. I’m not sure if the insect was already inside my home or if it hitched a ride from my car in the garage to my house (five feet away).
I would love to know what the bug is so that I may research it and determine how to deal with the insects, particularly if they are in my home somewhere. If you can tell me what the bug type is, I would appreciate it tremendously.
The bug was walking in a fashion that, to me, more resembled a spider, but it had six legs and two long antennae. I’m not comfortable killing insects so I brought it outside.
Take you’re time to answer my question. I don’t have any observable infestation. I only want to be prepared if it turns out the bug is poisonous and I see more.
Thank you so much!
Signature: Danielle

Assassin Bug Nymph

Assassin Bug Nymph

Dear Danielle,
Your request is so tremendously polite, we could not possibly delay responding to you once we opened it.  This is an immature Assassin Bug in the genus
Zelus, and it is definitely an outdoor predatory species.  It will be much happier outdoors and you have nothing to fear regarding an infestation of this insect.  You should exercise caution, however, when handling Zelus Assassin Bugs.  For some reason, they are prone to biting folks, though we suspect it is because they feel threatened.  Though the bite is reported to be somewhat painful, it is not considered dangerous.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: pool invaders
Location: San Diego California 92117
April 27, 2016 4:03 pm
These abundant lil bugs showed up in our pool yesterday. What are they?
Signature: swarmed swimmer

Seed Bugs, we believe

Seed Bugs, we believe

Dear swarmed swimmer,
We are not able to provide a definitive species identification at this time, but in our opinion these are either Seed Bugs in the family Lygaeidae (see BugGuide) or Dirt Colored Seed Bugs in the family Rhyparochromidae (also see BugGuide).  There are species in both families that periodically have tremendous population explosions when conditions are right.  They look very much like the Seed Bugs that infested Burning Man that are profiled on Gizmodo.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this
Location: Hillsdale, Michigan
April 25, 2016 5:42 am
This bug was crawling in my sons college house in southern central Michigan – approximately 15 miles from the Ohio line. Can you identify it?
Signature: Mama Chase

Western Conifer Seed Bug

Western Conifer Seed Bug

Dear Mama Chase,
This Western Conifer Seed Bug probably sought shelter indoors when the weather cooled to hibernate, which is why they are frequently found in homes and other buildings.  This is a harmless species.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Big Black Flying Bug
Location: Mid-Missouri, USA
April 25, 2016 6:36 am
Hi,
Found this guy yesterday eyeing me from the roof.
It’s springtime in Rolla, Missouri and all the bugs are happy.
He’s about an inch and a half long, looks all black, and must have good eyesight because he was looking at me. I thought he was a stink bug at first, but his body is round. He has a hump on his back, so maybe a relative of the whirligig beetle?
Signature: Bob in Rolla

Big Legged Bug

Big Legged Bug

Dear Bob,
This is a Big Legged Bug in the genus
Acanthocephala.  They are Leaf Footed Bugs in the family Coreidae, and they are in the same suborder as Stink Bugs, hence the resemblance.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination