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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: please help me identify this bug
Location: near austin Texas
July 4, 2015 1:36 pm
I found this bug swimming in my pool before i was going to clean it. Whatever is on its back looks interesting and im not sure how to identify it. I saw it swimming for a while then it nestled on the bottom of the pool. When i nudged it with a small stick to see if it was still alive it was not. So i carefully took it out and captured a picture of it. Any help would be appreciated. Thank you.
Signature: From Troy Godwin

Male Giant Water Bug with Eggs

Male Giant Water Bug with Eggs

Dear Troy,
This is a male Giant Water Bug in the genus
Belostoma.  After mating, the female cements the eggs onto the back of the male who then guards them until they hatch.  This is one of the very few examples from the insect world where the male plays any part in the care of the young.  You can verify our identification by viewing this image from BugGuide.

Antonia Tarnaroutskaya, Marieke Bruss, Kingson Mendoza Maqui, Alisha Bragg, Heather Duggan-Christensen liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Orange and Yellow Bug
Location: Georgia
July 2, 2015 7:31 am
Can you help us figure out what kind of bug this is? Never seen one like it before.
Signature: Thesouphead

Newly Metamorphosed Wheel Bug

Newly Metamorphosed Wheel Bug

Dear Thesouphead,
This is a Wheel Bug, the largest North American Assassin Bug, but what makes your image so interesting is the coloration.  Wheel Bugs are a dark gray, but just after metamorphosis, before the exoskeleton has a chance to harden, the color is much lighter.  Your Wheel Bug has just undergone metamorphosis from a nymph to a winged adult.

Mike Coughlin, Ann Levitsky, Jessica M. Schemm, Heather Duggan-Christensen liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Mantis-like thing?
Location: East Tennessee
June 28, 2015 1:48 am
Found this crawling on my computer screen today. I had a window open, but still, not sure how It got in the house. I thought he might be a Praying Mantis, but the eyes have me baffled. Anyone know what this is?
Whatever it is, it’s in my garden now. He looked like a predator, so I wanted to give him a chance to do what he was made for. :)
Signature: Kyrus

Spiny Assassin Bug Nymph

Spiny Assassin Bug Nymph

Dear Kyrus,
This is an immature Assassin Bug, and though they are not related to Mantids, they share the physical feature of raptoreal front legs.  We believe your nymph is a Spiny Assassin Bug in the genus
Sinea, and you can compare your image to this image on BugGuide.

Kingson Mendoza Maqui, Mike Coughlin, Tamara Cosgrove Grant, Alfonso Moreno liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Ed. Note:  Because our previous posting of Elm Seed Bugs has received so many recent comments, we have decided to make the Elm Seed Bug our Bug of the Month for July 2015 and to post it live a few days early.

Subject: Invaders!
Location: Salt Lake City Utah
June 27, 2015 12:13 pm
We have these little buggers that we seem to keep finding on the back end of our home near the windows. I found a nest of them underneath one of the blinds in our bedroom window. They dont appear to fly. They are about 1/4 inch long. What are they? Do they bite? How can we get rid of them? Thanks in advance…
Signature: -Loyal WTB fan for 5+ years

Elm Seed Bug

Elm Seed Bug

Dear Loyal WTB fan for 5+ years,
It appears that you have an Elm Seed Bug,
Arocatus melanocephalus, infestation, a nonnative species first reported in North America in Idaho in 2012.  As you must know, we do not provide extermination information, though we are sometimes freer when the species is invasive like the Elm Seed Bug.  There are currently numerous comments from readers on the first Elm Seed Bug posting in our archives, and you may find some help there.  According to Gemtek:  “Identification: Elm seed bugs are typically ⅓ inch long and are dark brown in color, with an abdomen that is reddish colored. Like a boxelder bug, their wings fold to form a thin X shape. Aside from color differences, elm seed and boxelder bugs look nearly identical.  Diet, Habitat, Life Cycle, and Habits:  Once again, elm seed bugs are similar to boxelder bugs in all of these aspects. A key difference is that elm seed bugs are primarily found on elm trees. They feed on elm seeds, but will also feed on and live in other types of trees. They are most visible in warmer weather and will create an unpleasant odor if crushed.”  According to BugGuide:  “Invade homes during the summer to escape heat, and then stick around through the winter … One generation per year and adults overwinter. Doesn’t pose a threat to trees, but may show up indoors in huge swarms.”

Elm Seed Bugs invade home.

Elm Seed Bugs invade home.

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Yucatan bug
Location: Yucatan, mexico
June 3, 2015 4:00 pm
Hi found this strange looking bug on the balcony of our hotel in Akumal, mexico. I have no idea what it is which annoys me as I like to know what animals are :-) hope you identify it!
Signature: Matt

Flag Footed Bug

Flag Footed Bug

Hi Matt,
This spectacular insect is a Flag Footed Bug,
Anisocelis flavolineata, and the common name is because of the enlarged tibiae on the hind legs.  We will be out of the office for a spell in mid-June and we are postdating this posting to go live in our absence.

Hi Daniel, thanks for the prompt reply! Great to be able to put a name to it! So many weird and wonderful bugs to be found in Mexico, I knew I should have taken my Macro lens – so much harder using a manual lens reverse mounted!
Thanks again
Matt

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Id my bug please
Location: Kodak TN
June 1, 2015 11:33 am
I found this bug dead in my dogs water bowl
Signature: thanks

Big Legged Bug

Big Legged Bug

Because of the yellow tipped antennae, we believe your Big Legged Bug is Acanthocephala terminalis, and you may compare your individual to this image on BugGuide.  We continued to search BugGuide for an image that revealed the back that is normally hidden under the wings, and we finally located this BugGuide image to confirm that the color on the dorsal surface is consistent with Acanthocephala terminalis.  Your submission will not go live on our site for several weeks as we will be away during part of June and not responding to emails nor creating new postings at that time.

Sue Dougherty, Andrea Leonard Drummond liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination