Currently viewing the category: "True Bugs"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Stink Bug??
Location: Belize
April 19, 2014 7:02 am
I am thinking this may be a stink bug! What do you think?
The colors are striking!! Light blue, vivid orange and black abdomen. (About 1/2″x1/4″x1/4″). Thank You!
Signature: Reggie

Stink Bug

Stink Bug

Do you have larger files?

Yes! I’ve sent you the originals. I’ve just sharpened them without cropping or size change. ( FYI, The bugs may be a little larger than I quoted. Maybe 3/4″ long instead of 1/2″.) Thanks!

Thanks for resending the images Reggie.  Unfortunately, all you did was crop the originals and the Stink Bug is not any larger in the resent files.  We identified you Stink Bug as Edessa rufomarginata on Flickr, and we verified that on an Asian version of National Geographic.  We also located an image of Edessa rufomarginata in our own archives.

Hi Daniel,
Thank you for going to all that trouble!! It’s wonderful to know what the critter is finally! None of my friends here had any idea what it might be! Sincerely, thank you!
Reggie

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Black and Red with White Spots
Location: 92595 [Wildomar, California]
April 19, 2014 4:11 pm
I just found this in my backyard and want to know if he will be bad for my vegetables, grapes and fruit trees. I’ve narrowed it down to either a Milkweed Bug or a Box Elder Bug… but don’t know.
Signature: Joseph Morabito

Small Milkweed Bug

Small Milkweed Bug

Dear Joseph,
You did a very good job of narrowing this identification to two similar looking species.  This is actually a Small Milkweed Bug,
Lygaeus kalmii, and we do not believe it will cause any significant problems in your garden.  Citations on BugGuide include:  “Adults suck nectar from flowers of various herbaceous plants, and also feed on milkweed seeds(?). Also reported to be scavengers and predators, especially in spring when milkweed seeds are scarce. They have been reported feeding on honey bees, monarch caterpillars and pupae, and dogbane beetles, among others. The Life of a Californian Population of the Facultative Milkweed Bug Lygaeus kalmii.  Adults mainly feed on milkweed seeds, but they often consume nectar from various flowers. Harvard Entomology.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this bug?
Location: El Pueblito, Corregidora, Queretaro, Mexico.
April 17, 2014 1:56 pm
I found this little bug over my leg when I was sitting on a bench outside my house. Ive never seen this kind of insect befere so I decided to take it home to take a few shots of it. It almost look like somebody painted on it, its really beautiful. I hope its not poisonous because I threw it away very close from home.
Signature: Oscar Vazquez

Giant Mesquite Bug Nymph

Giant Mesquite Bug Nymph

Hi Oscar,
The bold colors and markings on this Giant Mesquite Bug nymph make it quite unforgettable. 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: red bug, white spots, black legs
Location: Houston, TX
April 14, 2014 8:57 pm
just sent a note – have to correct it. This was found on Jan 11, 2014 in Houston. And I didn’t upload all the shots
Signature: Tom Lawson

Immature Milkweed Assassin Bug

Immature Milkweed Assassin Bug

Hi Tom,
This is a beneficial, predatory Milkweed Assassin Bug nymph,
Zelus longipes, and it should be handled with caution as they are known to bite.  The bite is not considered dangerous, but it can be painful.

Milkweed Assassin Bug Nymph

Milkweed Assassin Bug Nymph

Thanks so much – I’ll be caredul!

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Can you ID these and their nest
Location: Northern Texas
April 11, 2014 8:02 pm
I found some of these nymph stage bugs on my Live Oak tree last year and then this year i found several of their nests on my trees and house. The 1st picture is from this year, one up close to the eaves of my house on the bricks as they were hatching out. The 2nd picture is of them on my tree last year. I could not find anyone to ID them so sadly, I did spray them. The 3rd one is the bugs I collected off the tree after I sprayed them. (Sorry for that but I thought it would be better to err than have destructive bugs around. ) I just need to know what they are and if harmful or helpful. It looks like there are about 100 or so per nest. Hopefully the pictures are useful. If you use a viewer that can zoom in they looked good on my PC. Thanks for your help.
Signature: Dan in Texas

Wheel Bug Hatchlings

Wheel Bug Hatchlings

Dear Dan,
We hope our response this year prevents a similar carnage to that from last year.  These are beneficial, predatory Wheel Bug hatchlings, and they will help keep your trees and garden free of unwanted insect pests, eliminating the need to use pesticides.  Wheel Bugs are Assassin Bugs, and most are beneficial, and exception being the Blood Sucking Conenose Bugs.  Some other Assassin Bugs are prone to biting humans, and though the bite is painful and may cause local swelling, it is not considered dangerous, again the exception being the Blood Sucking Conenose Bugs.  We very rarely get reports of Wheel Bugs biting.  Adult Wheel Bugs are large, somewhat prehistoric looking creatures with a coglike “wheel” on the thorax. 

Wheel Bug Nymph Carnage

Wheel Bug Nymph Carnage

Daniel,
Thank you so much for the information and education.  I have seen a lot of the adult versions of these “armored wonders” around the house but never saw them in their early stages.  I must have found about 8 or 10 of these nests around, some already empty and I assure you now that I know what they are will not do them harm in the future.  I had contacted my agriculture agent about the adults I saw around and he informed me that they were beneficial insects but he could not identify the nest and nymph stages.
Thank you again for all your time and help.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Found Bug
Location: Surrey, BC Canada
April 10, 2014 8:03 am
Found this bug outside @ my work in Surrey, BC Canada. Just wondering what it is.
Signature: Kelly

Toe-Biter

Toe-Biter

Hi Kelly,
Our response to you yesterday was just a quick identification that this is a Toe-Biter, and we would like to elaborate a bit now that we have a moment.  Toe-Biters or Giant Water Bugs are also called Electric Light Bugs since they are attracted to lights.  They are aquatic predators that are capable of flying from pond to pond if the habitat dries up.  The bite is reported to be quite painful, and many a wader has encountered a Giant Water Bug with painful results, hence the common name of Toe-Biter.  Because of their large size and unusual appearance, the Toe-Biter is one of our most frequent identification requests.  As a side note, Giant Water Bugs are edible and their larger Asian cousins are considered a delicacy in Thailand.

Toe-Biter

Toe-Biter

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination