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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Diminutive Colorful Beetle from the Pacific Northwest
Location: Portland, Oregon
September 22, 2016 1:56 pm
It was a partly cloudy and 67° day when I noticed this colorful beetle moving around nervously on a hibiscus shrub. Its dimensions were about those of a mid to large sized ladybug and an unusually colorful insect for the Portland, Oregon area Thanks for any help you can provide in identifying it and for your wonderful website!
Signature: David

Green Stink Bug Nymph

Green Stink Bug Nymph

Dear David,
This is not a beetle.  It is a another Stink Bug nymph, and based on this BugGuide image, we have determined it is a Green Stink Bug nymph,
Chinavia hilaris.  Here is another image on the Journey to the Center blog.

Dear Daniel,
Thanks for your identification. No wonder I couldn’t find a photo of it — I was looking in the wrong order entirely. I need to start thinking “could it be a nymph?” when I see an unknown insect. The nymph is so snazzy and jewellike, but the adult rather ordinary looking. I’ll try not to “bug” you for a while.
Thanks again,
David

No problem David.  Whenever you get an image of something that you don’t recognize, feel free to send it our way and we will do our best.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: neon orange bug in Costa Rica with cool patterns
Location: Costa Rica
September 23, 2016 3:06 pm
Hola, My husband and I moved to Costa Rica a year and a half ago. We spend a lot of time photographing animals, wildlife and insects. Here is an interesting neon orange bug we came across with an interesting pattern. Any idea what kind of bug this is? We took this photo near the Osa Peninsula of Costa Rica on the Pacific side. Gracias!
Kari P Silcox
www.happycoconutstravelblog.com
Signature: Kari Pinkerton Silcox

Flag Footed Bug

Flag Footed Bug

Dear Kari,
This spectacular insect goes by the very descriptive name Flag Footed Bug,
Anisocelis flavolineata.

Thank you so much for the quick reply!
Kari

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: A True Bug I’ve Never Seen Before
Location: Portland, Oregon
September 20, 2016 6:18 pm
It’s been too many years since I took my college entomology class; are you able to identify unusual-looking bug? It was at rest on a hibiscus shrub and fairly relaxed about having its photo taken. The temperature was 64° and the skies partly cloudy. The location was the outskirts of Portland, Oregon.
Thanks!
Signature: David Hopkins

Brown Marmorated Stink Bug Nymph

Brown Marmorated Stink Bug Nymph

Dear David,
This is a Brown Marmorated Stink Bug Nymph,
Halyomorpha halys, a non-native species that was reported in North America “First collected in 1998 in Allentown, PA, but probably arrived several years earlier” according to BugGuide.  In less than 20 years, it has spread across North America and BugGuide reports:  “Native to E. Asia, adventive elsewhere” and “Highly polyphagous, reported on ~300 plant spp. in its native range; feeds mostly on fruit, but also on leaves, stems, petioles, flowers, and seeds. Damage typically confined to fruiting structures.”  According to the Minnesota Department of Agriculture:  “Across North America, brown marmorated stink bug has been found in 42 states and two Canadian provinces (Ontario and Quebec). It is causing severe agriculture problems in nine states and nuisance problems in 16 others.”  One of the reasons the Brown Marmorated Stink Bug is considered a nuisance is that they frequently enter homes to hibernate when the weather begins to cool.  Needless to say, we have no problem tagging the Brown Marmorated Stink Bug as an Invasive Exotic species.  You can compare your individual to this BugGuide image.

Thanks for your very prompt identification! I was familiar with the adult form, but this was the first time I saw the nymph form. You probably get questions about this all the time. In just the last few years it’s become so ubiquitous, that I see it more than any other hemipteran. Last winter, many tens of them congregated at the bathroom skylight for several weeks and removing them with the vacuum cleaner resulted in a vile stench — they lived up to their name!
Thanks again, Daniel.
David

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Is this a water scorpion?
Location: St Clair, N.S.W 2759
September 19, 2016 10:28 pm
Hi, my son and I are very big on insect spotting, this one popped up on our back porch and we have never seen anything like it. I have been researching for days to try figure out what he is and water scorpion is the closest I have come but we live out in the suburbs with no lakes,rivers or ponds anywhere.
Signature: Mummy and Noah

Water Scorpion

Water Scorpion

Dear Mummy and Noah,
This is indeed a Water Scorpion, and they are able to fly great distances in search of water.  According to Sportsman Creek Conservation Area:  “They can ambush fast swimming prey such as small fish catching them between their front legs and stabbing them with their pointed probiscus.  Known as Toe-biters able to inflict a nasty nip although this specimen played dead when disturbed. Water Scorpions are also capable fliers and inhabit waterholes over much of Australia.”  According to the Queensland Museum, Australian Water Scorpions are in the genus
Laccotrephes.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bug costa rica
Location: Guanacaste, Costa Rica
September 20, 2016 12:46 am
A friend of mine found a bug outside her house in Costa Rica (Santa Rosa, Guanacaste) on Sept 18 and was wondering whether it is dangerous. I did a google search with the picture she sent me and found other pictures of the same bug none of which however indicated the name and whether it could be dangerous.
Thank you for your help!
Signature: J.

Unknown True Bug

Bark Bug

Dear J,
At this time, we are unable to provide you with an identification beyond a very general suborder Heteroptera, the True Bugs.  We did find a matching image on Insectopedia, but it is only identified as:  “Strange weirdly shaped bug.”

Dear Daniel,
Thank you so much for your quick reply – I really appreciate it!
And thank you even more for the hint. It helped me to identify the bug. It’s called “Dysodius lunatus“.
Have a wonderful day,
Julia

Hi Again Julia,
According to Alamy, it is called a Bark Bug in the family Aradidae.  FlickR has a nice image.  This represents a new family for our site.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What’s that bug?
Location: San Diego
September 18, 2016 5:49 pm
We found this insect in our house on the coast in San Diego California during the month of September. Based on the pictures on your site, it looks like the red shouldered pine borer or a blister beetle? We cannot tell. Please help!
Thanks!
Signature: sandy vissman

Red Shouldered Bug

Red Shouldered Bug

Hi Sandy,
This is a Red Shouldered Bug,
Jadera haematoloma, a species that frequently forms large aggregations around homes and gardens.  Though it can be a nuisance when it appears in large numbers, it is considered a benign species.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination