Currently viewing the category: "True Bugs"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Mystery activity?
Location: Fannie, Ark.
August 26, 2014 8:03 pm
Who are these actors and what activity are they engaged in? Is one a male and one a female? Is one giving birth to the other? What is that gray worm-like thing coming out of the face of the larger? Why are the antennae of the winged smaller curving back to the thorax of the larger? Etc. Is this a unique photo? Can’t find anything like it on line!
Signature: Bill Burton

Metamorphosis

Metamorphosis of a Stilt Bug

Dear Bill,
The activity depicted in your image is metamorphosis.  The green nymph is emerging from the exoskeleton of an earlier instar so that the insect can grow.  Because of the proboscis, this insect looks like it might be a Hemipteran, possibly an Assassin Bug, but we are not certain.  We have requested assistance from Eric Eaton in the identification and classification.  It is a lovely image.

Eric Eaton Provides Identification
Daniel:
Wow, what an amazing image!  That is a stilt bug, family Berytidae.
Eric

Many thanks! I can now put it up on Capture Arkansas.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Soapberry bugs
Location: Pretoria, South Africa
August 25, 2014 10:06 am
here’s the pictures of the bugs I found on the trunks of these trees. Some people have them in their gardens too, but I’ve never seen them anywhere else. This picture was taken at the start of the winter.
Signature: Cindy

Cotton Stainer Aggregation

Cotton Stainer Aggregation

Dear Cindy,
We disagree with your identification.  We do not believe these are Soapberry Bugs in the subfamily Serinethinae, but rather Cotton Stainers  or Red Bugs in the family Pyrrhocoridae.  There are some similar looking images of Cotton Stainers in the genus
Dysdercus on ISpot and there is an image on FlickR identified as Dysdercus nigrofasciatus.  This note is also posted on ISpot:  “D. nigrofasciatus and D. fasciatus are not synonyms. There are four species of Dysdercus occurring in South Africa: fasciatus, nigrofasciatus, intermedius and superstitiosus. the first three looks superficially similar, but there are clear differences, for example: the head of fasciatus is significantly longer than the head of nigrofasciatus, etc.”  We are confident that the genus Dysdercus is correct, but we are uncertain of the species.

Cotton Stainer Aggregation

Cotton Stainer Aggregation

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What’s this bug?
Location: Chico, CA USA
August 21, 2014 5:17 pm
I was sitting on the couch and look at my window and though to myself, “That can’t be a tick.” I’ve been wondering what it is this whole time. Please help me out, and also if it helps for some reason there’s aanother one of these things close by, but its dead and all that left of it is like its shell.
Signature: -Anthony

Brown Marmorated Stink Bug

Brown Marmorated Stink Bug

Hi Anthony,
This is an invasive Brown Marmorated Stink Bug, a nonnative species that is spreading in North America.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: bug
Location: Portland Tn.
August 18, 2014 6:50 pm
Would like to know what this bug is and any other info. on it.
Signature: Carol

Jagged Ambush Bug Nymph

Jagged Ambush Bug Nymph

Dear Carol,
This is an immature Jagged Ambush Bug, and like the winged adult Jagged Ambush Bugs, they are adept hunters that ambush prey, generally by waiting on flowers for pollinating insects.  Ambush Bugs ambush prey, grasping them with their raptorial front legs and then using their piercing mouthparts to suck fluids from the bodies of the insects they capture.   See BugGuide for a comparison image.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Identification please.
Location: Michigan, USA
August 18, 2014 6:43 pm
Hi Bugman,
Discovered two of these insects on my Butterfly Bush today, August 18th. One very black and spiny looking, the other displayed more detail and color. They are 8-10mm in length. I find the mantis-like front legs of special interest. They showed little concern for my inspection of them. Thanks for your help!
Signature: Sheree Cooke

Ambush Bug

Jagged Ambush Bug

Hi Sheree,
This is a predatory Jagged Ambush Bug in the genus Phymata, and they frequently await on blossoms for prey to arrive, which means many of their victims are beneficial, pollinating insects.  Do not be fooled by the small size of this stealth predator, as a tiny Ambush Bug is capable of subduing much larger prey, including Honey Bees.  See BugGuide for a comparable image.

Jagged Ambush Bug

Jagged Ambush Bug

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Stink bud
Location: Wirtz VA.
August 16, 2014 12:29 pm
Please help me control these bugs at my sisters house in Wirtz VA. What can I do to control and get rid of them…. They came back with me to L.I. Last year and yes they really Stink!!! stillhairymary
Signature: From you daniel

Invisible Stink Bug (or Bud)

Invisible Stink Bug (or Bud)

Dear stillhairymary,
We have carefully inspected the attached image from corner to corner, scrutinizing all points in between, and try as we might, we are unable to find any Stink Bud or Stink Bug for that matter.
  We suspect you may be inquiring about the Brown Marmorated Stink Bug, Halyomorpha halys, an invasive, introduced species that is becoming a major agricultural pest and general nuisance in much of North America.  We do not provide extermination advice.  You may find some helpful information on the Penn State Entomology site as well as numerous other resources on the internet.

Yes thank you for your answer. That looks like the bug  my sister has. Very stinky if you squish them. They will hide anywhere so they came back to Long Island last fall in my suitcase lining and clothing I had packed up the day before I left.  Love your site, made my day Saturday!!!

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination