Currently viewing the category: "True Bugs"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Some type of bug
Location: San Francisco
May 27, 2015 1:53 pm
There’s a large amount of these bugs grouped together on a wild plant on the side of a construction site. I thought maybe a stink or squash bug but can’t find a picture of one that looks exactly like these.
Signature: Vonny

Squash Bug Nymphs

Squash Bug Nymphs

Dear Vonny,
We don’t know where you located images of Squash Bugs, but these look like immature Squash Bugs in the genus
Anasa based on this image posted to BugGuide.  Though BugGuide does not report any California sightings of Anasa tristis, the genus is represented in California.  The plant that they are feeding upon looks like a member of the squash family Cucurbitaceae to us.

Squash Bug Nymphs

Squash Bug Nymphs

Sue Dougherty liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Webspinner?
Location: Austin
May 20, 2015 12:05 pm
They’re everywhere
Signature: Danyel

Long Necked Seed Bug

Long Necked Seed Bug

Dear Danyel,
This is a Long Necked Seed Bug,
Myodocha serripes, and according to BugGuide, they feed on:  “Seeds of strawberry and St. John’s wort. Sometimes a pest of strawberries.”  There is contradictory information in the El Dorado Springs Sun Online in an article LONG-NECK SEED BUGS BENEFICIAL IN STRAWBERRIES where it states:  “Jill Scheidt, agronomy specialist with University of Missouri Extension, has seen several long-neck seed bugs in many strawberry patches during the late spring.  ‘Long-necked seed bugs are a beneficial insect in strawberries,’ said Scheidt.”  The article contains information from another expert:  “They can be found under leaf litter in early spring and in fields and under artificial lights in the summer. Long-necked seed bugs overwinter in woodland and migrate to fields in the spring and summer; they are attracted to lights.  According to Richard Houseman, University of Missouri plant sciences professor, long-neck seed bugs will sometimes feed on strawberry seeds but are rarely a threat needing treatment. They do feed on pests like St. John’s wort and other small insects.”  Do you live near where strawberries are cultivated?

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: orange and black
Location: Mandeville, Louisiana
May 20, 2015 3:21 pm
My daughter and I brought a bug home from Mandeville, LA to live in our terrarium. It has molted and grown larger.
Signature: Laura

Florida Predatory Stink Bug

Florida Predatory Stink Bug

Dear Laura,
This is an adult Florida Predatory Stink Bug,
Euthyrhunchus floridanus, a beneficial species that is sometimes called a Halloween Bug because of the colors and markings.  We just posted an image of immature Florida Predatory Stink Bug nymphs.

Oh wow that’s so cool! I really appreciate the swift reply. Now I can research how to take care of our little Halloween friend. I hope I can find some more. I wouldn’t mind a little colony in my terrarium. Thank you so much!!

Sue Dougherty, Amy Gosch liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Tell me this isn’t a beg bug
Location: philadelphia
May 20, 2015 5:00 am
Hello,
I am hoping you can help me figure out what this is. This is the third one of this bugs I have seen in my apartment, the first was on the wall by our linen closet, the second on the couch, and this was on the wall above my bed. I flushed the first and squished the second two and both had a blood like color left behind when I squished it. I live with roommates so any of us could have tracked something like this in. We also live around a few large trees so it is not uncommon for us to see various bugs/spiders. I have also checked my mattress and have not seen anything suspicious.
Signature: nervous renter

Bed Bug

Bed Bug

Dear nervous renter,
This is a Bed Bug.

John Giangrosso, Aaron Paustian liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: vey pretty bug
Location: mississippi
May 19, 2015 2:45 pm
Will you please tell me what kind of big this is? I have never seen any before.
Signature: amy

Florida Predatory Stink Bug Nymphs

Florida Predatory Stink Bug Nymphs

Dear Amy,
These are the beneficial nymphs of the Florida Predatory Stink Bug.
  Adults generally mature in the autumn and they are sometimes called Halloween Bugs.

Alisha Bragg, Amy Gosch, Andrea Leonard Drummond, Kevin Trejo, Sue Dougherty liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: HELP whole ground is moving
Location: West Texas
May 17, 2015 11:17 am
I need to see if someone could identify this bug so that I can get this under control. Had an exterminator tell me it was a chich bug and then a stink bug. My well groomed yard has none. My outside yard has weeds they were green now dead. I’ve seen some in my winow seals. they give me the chill bumps. Going out of my mind.
Signature: chilledtothebone

Possibly Immature Dirt Colored Seed Bugs

Possibly Immature California False Chinch Bugs

Dear chilledtothebone,
These are immature True Bugs, and nymphs can be very difficult to identify.  Your individuals look very similar to these still unidentified nymphs from Montana we posted several years back, and we suspect you may also have Dirt Colored Seed Bugs in the family Rhyparochromidae.

Do yall happen to know anything about them? I did notice so.ething this morning I had not seen and that was several black bugs around but no nymphs. I will take pictures in the moring or evening to see if it helps any I’ve attached a video to help as well. And will send a couple more pictures on next email.  And what they are living in.  Do you know if they are harmful to anything?

Possibly Dirt Colored Seed Bugs

Possibly California False Chinch Bugs

Dear chilledtothebone,
Thanks for sending additional images that contain winged adults.  That should make identification easier.  We believe the transparent wings on the adults and the markings on the nymphs are a good match for these California False Chinch Bugs,
Xyonysius californicus, that are pictured on BugGuide.  According to BugGuide, they are:  “common on trees in Mar-Apr in Central TX.”  The Arthropods of Orange County site has some excellent images.

Possibly Dirt Colored Seed Bugs

Possibly California False Chinch Bugs

Sue Dougherty, Andrea Leonard Drummond liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination