Currently viewing the category: "Ticks"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: BUGS
Location: On my head
September 30, 2016 2:42 am
today i was bush walking and when I got home after a couple hours one part of my head really started to ache and I felt something scab like and I tried pulling it off, it just would not come off so I went into the bathroom and ripped it off to find it was something that looked like a spider, very small. Now there is a large lump where it was and my head still hurts. What was it?
Signature: I don’t know what this means

Tick

Tick

You picked up a Tick in the bush, and it sounds like it bit you.  You might want to seek medical attention as Ticks spread Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever, Lyme Disease and other potentially dangerous pathogens.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Need to identify bug(s)
Location: New Jersey
May 24, 2016 6:26 am
Thanks in advance for your time and service you provide.
My daughter went to zoo yesterday and her mom found two bugs on her scalp (partially penitrating scalp). I am worried as I have a 9th month old as well at home and wanted to isolate this incident as one time thing. You help will identifying and any recommendation would be of great help.
Signature: As per the procedure

Ticks

Ticks

Your daughter has Ticks.  They will not breed on her, so removing the offensive creatures should eliminate the problem.

Thank you Daniel. They are off her and we monitor her for any fever or rash. I am proactively calling on the pest terminator to examine her room to see if we have more of them.
Anyways thanks again for your prompt response. You are a great resource/help for people like me.
Thanks
Tejas

You are welcome.  Most people pick up Ticks while walking in woods and fields.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Thought it was corn
Location: Los Angeles
January 17, 2016 11:15 am
Hi,
Found this morning. May have been on the dog or not. Thought it was an unpopped corn until legs came out of it and started walking.
Signature: Dok

Tick

Tick

Dear Dok,
This is a blood-engorged Tick, and chances are good it fell off the dog.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Thus was in my back
Location: Rhode Island
May 9, 2015 8:08 pm
Thank god my wife was bothering me. She found this in my back. What is it?
I was recently in Scottsdale AZ.
Signature: Hopefully ok,

Tick

Tick

Dear Hopefully ok,
You were bitten by a Tick.  Ticks are known vectors for several diseases that can be spread to humans.  We would suggest a visit to a physician.

Tick

Tick

A tick, eh?  It looks different than I remember.  Thank you for helping clear that up.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Mystery bug
Location: Boise, Idaho
April 19, 2015 5:51 pm
Just today I found this little guy on my bed, and after some exhaustive research, I still can’t quite figure out what it is!! Any help would be greatly appreciated!!
Signature: Kelsey

Blood Engorged Tick

Blood Engorged Tick

Dear Kelsey,
This is a blood engorged Tick, indicating that it either fed from you or a bedmate, possibly a dog.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bed Bug or Not?
Location: California
April 19, 2015 11:17 am
found this on the back of my son and it was hard to pull it off. This was a single occcurance as well, I have moved the furniture and removed mattresses but no sign of eggs or more insects. I’m wondering if it’s a bed bug or something else which I don’t have to worry about eggs and infestation. I did already get bed bug spray as precaution and sprayed my kids bedrooms edges and corners as well.
Thanks in advance.
Signature: Ali

Tick

Tick

Dear Ali,
This is a Tick, not a Bed Bug, and it was most likely picked up outdoors.  Based on this image posted to BugGuide, it looks like an American Dog Tick,
Dermacentor variabilis.  According to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention:  “American dog tick (Dermacentor variabilis) is the most commonly identified species responsible for transmitting Rickettsia rickettsii, which causes Rocky Mountain spotted fever in humans. The American dog tick can also transmit tularemia. This tick is widely distributed east of the Rocky Mountains and also occurs in limited areas on the Pacific Coast. D. variabilis larvae and nymphs feed on small rodents. Dogs and medium-sized mammals are the preferred hosts of adult D. variabilis, although it feeds readily on other large mammals, including humans.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination