Currently viewing the category: "Stoneflies and Snowflies"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: They’re everywhere!
Location: Central PA
March 28, 2014 12:41 pm
There are at least a dozen of these bugs hanging out on my front porch.. and they love to hitch a ride indoors by falling/jumping onto my clothes as I walk through the door. What are they?
Signature: Randi

Stonefly

Winter Stonefly

Dear Randi,
This is a Stonefly in the order Plecoptera, and it looks very similar to the Winter Stonefly in the genus
Taeniopteryx that is pictured on BugGuide.  The nymphs are aquatic, and according to BugGuide:  “nymphs of most spp. develop in cool, well-oxygenated water and do not tolerate pollution; therefore, their presence is an indicator of good water quality, and their absence in areas where they previously occurred may indicate pollution,” so you must have clean, unpolluted water nearby.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Huh?
Location: Red Deer, Alberta, Canada
February 9, 2014 11:48 am
Hi there,
In April 2013, we were sitting under a bridge by the river, when we noticed these guys all over the wall. They were about 5 cm long and didn’t move much (we however found we moved very quickly).
Thanks!
Signature: with love, confusion and the heebie jeebies

Stonefly Exuvia

Stonefly Exuvia

This is the exuvia of a Stonefly, a flying insect that spends its immature development as an aquatic naiad.  When maturity approaches, the naiad leaves the water and molts for the last time, emerging as a winged adult Stonefly.  Here is an image of a similar looking Stonefly Exuvia from BugGuide.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: help what are these bugs???
Location: north haven, ct
July 3, 2013 8:57 pm
there are about 40 of these insects all over our slider door on the outside and all mating with each other.. what are they???
Signature: no preference

Stoneflies and Click Beetle

Stoneflies and Click Beetle

Most of these insects are Stoneflies, but there is a Click Beetle in the upper right hand corner.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: what insect is this?
Location: Baltimore County, MD
June 30, 2013 3:58 pm
We live near a pond in Maryland. We have been here for 4 years and have not seen this insect until now. They came out of nowhere and swarmed around the lights and the windows anywhere there was light. What is it? Thanks.
Signature: ravensfan

Stonefly

Stonefly

Dear ravensfan,
This is a female Stonefly in the order Plecoptera, and she is carrying about her egg mass.  Soneflies have aquatic larvae known as naiads, so the nearby pond is likely a factor in the sudden appearance.  Here is a similar photo from BugGuide.  The BugGuide page for the order indicates:  “females deposit several egg masses, which together may total more than 1,000 eggs, by flying over water or occasionally by crawling up to the water; some nymphs are known to molt 12-36 times, and require one to three years to mature; full-grown nymphs leave the water, cling to shoreline vegetation and debris, and molt into the adult stage” and “nymphs of most spp. develop in cool, well-oxygenated water and do not tolerate pollution; therefore, their presence is an indicator of good water quality, and their absence in areas where they previously occurred may indicate pollution.”

Stonefly

Stonefly with eggs

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Stonefly?
Location: Maple Ridge, BC, Canada
April 26, 2013 3:02 pm
hi bugman!
This colourful flying insect had a collision with my brother’s mower. I think it’s a Stonefly. The closest match I’ve been able to find is Utaperla gaspesiana.
The eggbundle was attached to the insects abdomen.
Signature: Storm

Giant Stonefly with Eggs

Giant Stonefly with Eggs

Dear Storm,
While we agree that this is a Stonefly, we disagree with your species identification.  While the markings on
Utaperla gaspesiana as pictured on BugGuide look similar to the markings on your individual, we believe you have a Giant Stonefly in the genus Pteronarcys.  We were most curious about the egg bundle, so we did some research.  We located a similar photo on FlickR with the comment:  “Found this on a screen door, perhaps 100 yards from a brook. Large (2″?) egg-laden female. I think it may be Pteronarcys dorsata. May 28, 2011.”  The photographers, Jerry Schoen took the image in White Oaks, Williamstown, Massachusetts.  That same photo can be found duplicated on numerous other websites including The River’s Calendar.  The Elk River Guiding Company website also has a photo of a Stonefly with Eggs.  You can read more about Giant Stoneflies on BugGuide.

Giant Stonefly

Giant Stonefly

Thank you for submitting your photos.

Giant Stonefly

Giant Stonefly

 

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: mystery insect in VA
Location: Southwest VA
April 18, 2013 8:07 am
Hello!
My dad found this fellow in Virginia. He was unable to identify it and I’m stumped as well. We thought you all might have better luck.
Signature: Kelsey

Stonefly

Giant Stonefly

Dear Kelsey,
This beauty is a Giant Stonefly in the genus
Pteronarcys.  You can see BugGuide for additional information.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination