Currently viewing the category: "Springtails!"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bug ID
Location: Central New Jersey
July 7, 2016 4:11 am
I have a number of bugs that seem localized to my kitchen, almost all I’ve seen on the floor, only a couple on the walls. They are very small, do not apear winged but seem to be able to jump. They are not on my 2 dogs. I cannot find a concentration of them in any one spot. They are not in my cabinets, I don’t see any in the crawlspace beneath the kitchen or I’m the adjacent garage or dining room. Please help?
Signature: Chris

Springtail

Springtail

Dear Chris,
This is a benign Elongate Bodied Springtail, and though they are not considered harmful, and are in fact considered beneficial, they can be a nuisance if too plentiful.

Thank you Daniel after a little research I discovered the same thing after I emailed you but definitely good to get a confirmation from an expert, I really appreciate it. Now I just have to figure out how to get them out of my house.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Big on my Chicken Coop
Location: Ohio
May 3, 2016 6:47 pm
Hello,
I live in southern Ohio and have been seeing these small bugs all over my chicken coop. They do not seem to bother the chickens. Just wondering what this bug is.
Signature: Thank you!

Springtails

Elongate Bodied Springtails

Though they have six legs, primitive Springtails are classified independently from Insects into the class Collembola.  As you observed, they are benign creatures that can become a nuisance if they get plentiful when conditions are favorable.  According to BugGuide:  “Springtails are ‘decomposers’ that thrive mostly on decaying organic matter, especially vegetable matter. They may also graze on spores of molds and mildews, especially indoors where there is a lack of other food sources.”  Springtails are cosmopolitan, and they can be found worldwide.

Springtails

Elongate Bodied Springtails

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Help identify!
Location: Van Nuys, Ca
April 26, 2016 6:41 pm
Dear bugman,
I have suddenly found a ton of these in my house. I live in the San Fernando Valley in Los Angeles county. I see them both during the day and the night. They are tiny and I have no idea what they are. Help!
Signature: Orli

Springtail

Springtail

Dear Orli,
You have Springtails, primitive insects that can get quite plentiful when conditions are right.  They are benign creatures, but they can become a nuisance if their populations rise.

Springtail

Springtail

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Tiny orange bugs
Location: Everett, WA
April 20, 2016 7:31 am
These are all over our garden boxes! What on earth are they?!(you have to zoom in on the picture……tons and tons of tiny orange bugs)
Signature: Erin

Springtails

Springtails

Dear Erin,
These are most surely Springtails in the order Collembola, and we did a search for orange Springtails in Washington, which led us to the BugGuide image of a single tiny individual in the genus
Tomocerus.  Springtails are benign creatures that can be a nuisance if they are too plentiful.  According to BugGuide:  “Springtails are ‘decomposers’ that thrive mostly on decaying organic matter, especially vegetable matter. They may also graze on spores of molds and mildews, especially indoors where there is a lack of other food sources.”

Springtails

Springtails

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Tiny forest bug
Location: Yakushima, Japan
March 24, 2016 2:02 pm
Hello bugman folks!
I spotted this little guy last July in the rain forest at an altitude of around 1,000m.
(S)He was less than an 1/8th inch. At first, I mistook it for a spider or a mite and I didn’t realize how cute he was until –with my curiosity spiked by the spikes on his back–I took a closeup photo. Now all I can say is, what’s this bug with the funny proboscis?
Many thanks and love for all you do to promote little critters!
Signature: Jenny

Globular Springtail

Globular Springtail

Dear Jenny,
This is a Globular Springtail in the Order Symphypleona from the Class Collembola, arguably the most plentiful Hexapods on the planet.  You can see some similar images of Globular Springtails on Matt Cole Macro Photography.

Sweet! Thank you so much bugman!!!! I’m going to keep a lookout for more Globular Springtails!

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: A tiny bug that bites and moves onthe body
Location: Arequipa, Peru (South America)
March 8, 2016 9:27 pm
Good Evening,
I am fighting with a tiny bugs that bites and moves on all ove my body but moves more on the lower part and that is irritating, they more active at night I cleaned everything many times in detail even put my home stuff like furniturer, clothes, bed sheets, blankets, carpets etc. in sunlight almost for a week and washed they properly but nothing.
I live with my wife son and sister but most interesting thing is they dont feel anything e even i have shown them many times alive and moving and have a clear video where we can see them moving in wash bason wash bason because its white and I wanted them to see them clearly with a better plain background.
Here I am attaching a photo for the reference and I really want to know what is that bug.
Thanks and Kind Regards
Shaiman
Signature: Micro Bug biting

Elongate Bodied Springtail, we believe

Elongate Bodied Springtail, we believe

Dear Shaiman,
Though the quality of your image is not ideal, we believe this is an Elongate Bodied Springtail.  Based on information we have read, they are considered benign and they do not bite, however, we do have a robust network of commenters on our site regarding a posting Unknown Parasites, and at least one commenter claims that Springtails in the order Collembola are the source of the problem.  Finally, according to Headlice.org: “A 1955 report to the medical literature, apparently overlooked or ignored, sheds new light on the problem and the National Pediculosis Association’s (NPA) efforts to alert the medical community and public health officials to the ability of Collembola to infest or colonize humans.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination