Currently viewing the category: "Wolf Spiders"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: My friend is a Peace Corps volunteer in Senegal and found THIS fascinating spider…
Location: Kedougou Region of Senegal
November 2, 2014 8:46 pm
Hi Bugman!
My friend is volunteering in the Kedougou Region of Senegal. He found this spider while walking on a dirt path at night walking from Wouridje back to Thianguey.
I know the photo is from at night, but any ideas as to what it might be? I thought perhaps a Hunstman spider?
Thanks so much!
Signature: Trying to help going to Senegal more appealing…

Possible Wolf Spider

Possible Wolf Spider

We do not believe this is a Huntsman Spider.  The shape reminds us more of a Wolf Spider, but alas, the eye pattern is not visible in your image.  Perhaps one of our readers can offer additional information.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Large spider
Location: On my cousins foot in Texas. October 17th
October 17, 2014 9:45 pm
What kind of spider is this?
Signature: Curious creeper

Carolina Wolf Spider

Carolina Wolf Spider

Dear Curious creeper,
Several time in recent month, we have tentatively identified large Wolf Spiders as Carolina Wolf Spiders,
Hogna carolinensis, but in your case we are nearly certain that the image you submitted is of a Carolina Wolf Spider, which according to BugGuide can be identified because of:  “Orange paturons (chelicera) and black around the the “knees” ventrally are characteristics of the species.(Jeff Hollenbeck)” and both of those characteristics are evident in your image.  Carolina Wolf Spiders range well beyond the Carolinas.  Though a large individual might bite if carelessly handled, Carolina Wolf Spiders are not considered dangerous.

Andrea Leonard Drummond liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Michigan Funnel Web Spider
Location: Millington Michigan
October 4, 2014 1:54 pm
Will you please help me identify this spider for my sister? She was pulling tall-ish (around 2′ tall) weeds when this spider jumped at her. She told me that a thick, funnel web was located close to where the spider came from. I would like to be able to give her more information than “It’s a funnel-web spider sis.” . Especially since spiders have the ability to scare the bejeebers out of her! No one should have to go through life without their bejeebers. Thanks for your help.
Signature: SuziQ

Possibly Funnel Web Wolf Spider

Possibly Carolina Wolf Spider

Dear SusiQ,
With all due respect, we find it somewhat odd that your sister had the bejeebers scared out of her, but the spider appears to have died because of the encounter.  We actually think this looks more like a Wolf Spider than a Funnel Web Spider, and in trying to research its identity on BugGuide, we are struck with the similarity of its appearance to members of the genus
Sosippus, the Funnel Web Wolf Spiders.  BugGuide only has reports of the genus Sosippus from Florida and California, so we don’t really believe this spider is a Funnel Web Wolf Spider.  Our money is on this being a Carolina Wolf Spider, Hogna carolinensis, based on this image posted to BugGuide.  According to BugGuide:  “Orange paturons (chelicera) and black around the the “knees” ventrally are characteristics of the species.(Jeff Hollenbeck)” and your individual does appear to have the orange chelicerae or fangs.  BugGuide also notes:  “Considered to be the largest wolf spider in North America.”  Large Wolf Spiders may bite, but they are considered harmless.  Somehow, no matter what we have to say about the harmless and beneficial attributes of spiders, we would not be able to convince your sister to attempt peaceful cohabitation.  If our suspicions about how this individual met its fate are correct, our Unnecessary Carnage tag is duly warranted.  If we are wrong and this spider met with a natural death, let us know and we will remove the tag.  

Possibly Funnel Web Wolf Spider

Carolina Wolf Spider we believe

This was definitely an “Unnecessary Carnage” incident.  My sister has been excessively frightened by spiders her whole life.  Thank-you for the I.D.  I have let her know what the result was and that she should not kill them in the future.  Hopefully she will just run away if she encounters any other creepy crawlies.

 

Gwen Skinner liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Invading ground spiders
Location: texas
September 7, 2014 8:15 pm
I live down in the Texas costal area. I keep finding these spiders everywhere when I go to take my dogs out at night. Ive seen them range from as little as a dime to about 4 inches big. I always see them on the ground hiding in little wholes kinda like sand crabs and never see any webbing. They are quick and so far haven’t been a issue but I would like to find out what they are and make sure they are not poisonous towards me or the dogs
Signature: Concerned dog owner

Wolf Spider

Wolf Spider

Dear Concerned dog owner,
We can’t help but to be amused that you have referred to this Wolf Spider and its kin as “Invading ground spiders” when they have in fact been present in that area far longer than you, your dog, your ancestors or your dog’s ancestors.  Wolf Spiders are native predators that help to control populations of insects and small arthropods.  Like most spiders they have venom, but that venom is not considered especially toxic to humans, nor do we believe it to be toxic to canines.  Wolf Spiders rarely bite people, and in the event a bite occurs, the effects are generally mild and include local swelling and redness as well as tenderness.  The effects are also short-lived.  Since you indicate these Wolf Spiders are found in holes, we suspect they are Burrowing Wolf Spiders in the genus
Geolycosa, and more information on the genus is available on BugGuide.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Spider wasp’s (rescued) victim
August 22, 2014 9:14 am
I saw a wolf spider being attacked by a blue spider wasp today, and I managed to chase away the wasp and rescue the spider. I know some species only temporarily paralyze the victim, and I’ve seen the spider twitch, so…does he have any chance of recovering? I feel bad for intervening, especially since it’s probably too late for the spider, but the poor guy was trying very hard to get away, and I wanted to help him out.
I don’t know what kind exactly the wasp was, but it’s a Michigan variety.
Signature: Kitt

Blue Black Spider Wasp preys upon Wolf Spider (from our archives)

Blue Black Spider Wasp preys upon Wolf Spider (from our archives)

Dear Kitt ,
We have heard of a Tarantula recovering from the sting of a wasp, but the whole purpose of the sting is to paralyze the spider so that it will provide food for the wasp larvae.  We are uncertain if it will recover.  We have illustrated your posting with an image from our archives.

Thanks for responding, and I’m glad you could answer my question. I’ll keep an eye on the spider. who knows? He might recover soon.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Spider Warrior
Location: Texas
August 21, 2014 12:58 pm
this is just a pic i took that i thought i would share the story behind it is my mom poured soapy water to get rid of some ants outside near our melons in the process this big spider got washed out i picked it up with a stick to get it out and brushed the suds off with a leaf i left it for 20 minutes alone under a pot plant hoping it would be okay. but it wasn’t moving and its legs started to curl. i saw my nephews toys and thought well its dead i could take a nice pic, 10 minutes after the pic it jumped to life and scurried away i was shocked but happy it did not die
Signature: Coyote

Wolf Spider saved from Drowning

Wolf Spider saved from Drowning

Dear Coyote,
We love your story and accompanying image of this Wolf Spider rescued from drowning.  We have heard other accounts of drowned Wolf Spiders rescued from swimming pools that also revived and survived.  We are also tagging this posting with the Bug Humanitarian Award.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination