Currently viewing the category: "Wolf Spiders"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Looking for identification
Location: Denver, Colorado, in a basement, near a window sill
August 23, 2016 9:25 pm
Hello! I found a spider about 3/4 inch in diameter. It is all black, with a dorsal that is covered in tiny white polka dots. The dorsal is very lumpy. I’ve never seen anything like it and can’t seem to find anything that resembles it online. Unfortunately, I didn’t get a great look at its eyes as I was afraid to get too close since I don’t know what it is
Signature: Michaelanne Stuhr

Wolf Spider with Spiderlings

Wolf Spider with Spiderlings

Dear Michaelanne,
The only spiders that care for young in this manner, by carrying them about riding on the abdomen, are harmless Wolf Spiders.  A large Wolf Spider might bite if threatened, and approaching a female with a brood would constitute a threat to her young, but the bite is not considered serious to humans.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Un-identified flying bug
Location: Boise, Idaho
August 2, 2016 7:19 pm
My wife spotted this bug carrying a large wolf spider up the inside wall if the sprinkler valve box. The spider was still twitching which has lead me to believe this was the killer. I live in Boise Idaho. This was seen today August 1st. Sorry the photos are lousy, I didn’t dare get closer.
Signature: Nick

Spider Wasp preys upon Wolf Spider

Spider Wasp preys upon Wolf Spider

Dear Nick,
Despite the poor quality of your images, this Spider Wasp,
Tachypompilus ferrugineus, is quite recognizable.  The reason the Wolf Spider was still twitching is that it is still alive.  This Spider Wasp will not be eating this Wolf Spider.  Like most wasps, Spider Wasps feed upon nectar from flowers and other sweets like overly ripe fruit.  This living Wolf Spider has been paralyzed so that it can provide a living food source, meaning fresh meat, for the larva that hatches from the egg the Spider Wasp will lay on the Wolf Spider once she has dragged it to the underground nest she has excavated.  According to MOBugs:  “The females of this species are expert spider hunters. They seek large species of spiders such as wolf spiders to paralyze. They will sting the spider with a fast acting venom designed to subdue their prey, but not kill it. She will then drag the unfortunate victim to a safe spot and secret it away out of sight. She will then lay her eggs on the spider and leave to hunt for more victims. It takes a few days for the eggs to hatch and during that time the spider will remain very much alive, just in a constant state of paralytic motionlessness. When the eggs hatch they will feed on the spider so lovingly provided for it by its mother. ” 

Spider Wasp preys upon Wolf Spider

Spider Wasp preys upon Wolf Spider

Sounds horrible! Thanks for the quick reply.
Nick

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Hefty spider
Location: Kentucky
April 18, 2016 3:05 pm
I was turning dirt in the garden yesterday and this hefty spider ran out of the dirt, across my shoe and started up my pants leg. I shook her(?) out, caught her in a plastic container and moved her to a stump where she’d be out of the way and not get stepped on. Her body, counting legs, is wider than my thumb and as long. She’s a heavy bodied babe. She leapt off of the stump and actually made a thump when she landed. I’m guessing she’s some kind of a trap door spider, but I really don’t know, and I’d like to be able to put a name on her. Could you help, please?
Signature: Gin, who likes golden orb weavers better

Wolf Spider

Wolf Spider

Dear Gin,
This is not a Trapdoor Spider.  It is a Wolf Spider, possibly a Carolina Wolf Spider,
Hogna carolinensis, which is pictured on BugGuide.

Wolf Spider

Wolf Spider

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this spider?
Location: Mwandi, South Zambia
January 27, 2016 3:56 am
Hello bug people,
On a trip to Zambia in July last year, we encountered a phat spidr in the small town of Mwandi in Southern Zambia. We were wondering if you could identify it for us, we think it may be a wolf spider. Thanks very much.
Signature: Phat Spyda

Probably Wolf Spider

Probably Wolf Spider

Dear Phat Spyda,
We believe you are correct that this is a Wolf Spider in the family Lycosidae, but a dorsal view or a close-up of the eyes would aid in identification.  Your individual looks similar to this Wolf Spider from iSpot.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Cockroach killer!!!
Location: Memphis, TN, USA
November 7, 2015 3:49 pm
Hi – can anyone identify this cockroach killing spider from Memphis, TN?
We think it’s probably a wolf spider from our google search.
Signature: Josh

Wolf Spider eats Cockroach

Wolf Spider eats Cockroach

Dear Josh,
We agree that this is a Wolf Spider.  Wolf Spiders do not build a web to snare prey.  They hunt without a web and they are often nocturnal, which makes them effective in controlling Cockroach populations.  We hope your image will cause more of our readers to have a tolerance and appreciation of harmless Wolf Spiders.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this bug
Location: Northern Illinois, USA
September 21, 2015
Saw what appears to be a mother spider with tons of babies all over it, pretty big once I got close, can you tell me what kind it is?
Signature: Jbmanz

Wolf Spider with Spiderlings

Wolf Spider with Spiderlings

Dear Jbmanz,
This is a female Wolf Spider from the family Lycosidae with some spiderlings.  With future submissions, please use our standard form which can be found by clicking the Ask What’s That Bug? link on our site.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination