Currently viewing the category: "Wolf Spiders"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Kukulcania Hibernalis question
Location: South central Virginia
May 24, 2015 9:49 am
I saw this on the side of the house. I believe it’s a Kukulcania Hibernalis, the southern house spider. Do you know if the female carries its young on its back? Or is this a wolf spider? Thanks!
Signature: Nina Eagle

Wolf Spider with Spiderlings

Wolf Spider with Spiderlings

Dear Nina,
This maternal behavior is characteristic of Wolf Spiders in the family Lycosidae.  Alas, we cannot tell you to which species she belongs.

wolf Spider with Spiderlings

wolf Spider with Spiderlings

Alisha Bragg, Carol Love, Boudreaux Rigm, Kevin Trejo, Jenny Caruso Nelms, Sabina Swift, Kathy Haines, Sue Dougherty, Em-Jill Holohan, Jessica M. Schemm, Debbie King, Catherine Chapman, Kristi E. Lambert, Ann Levitsky, Kitty Heidih liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Huntsman?
Location: Moccasin, AZ (Northern AZ Strip)
May 1, 2015 4:47 pm
Hey buggy person! In case the first picture didn’t go through, here’s a smaller resize. Found this big guy in Pipe Spring National Monument, near Moccasin, AZ on the Arizona Strip.
Signature: Kait

Wolf Spider:  Hogna coloradensis we believe

Wolf Spider: Hogna coloradensis we believe

Dear Kait,
This is one spectacular looking spider.  It is not a Huntsman Spider.  You can tell by the eye arrangement on your excellent image that it is a Wolf Spider.  We believe, based on this BugGuide image, that your spider is Hogna coloradensis.  According to BugGuide:  “Range Mostly CO & NM, and also just across the border into AZ & TX. There are old notes of it being found in KS & NE, but those specimens couldn’t be verified.  Habitat A dominant species found in sandy environments of New Mexico.  Remarks  This species creates a burrow (no turret) and may use small rocks/debris to close the burrow entrance.”

Probably Hogna coloradensis, a Wolf Spider

Probably Hogna coloradensis, a Wolf Spider

Ann Levitsky, Donald Austin, Juliet Green, Lauren Zappone Maples, Alisha Bragg, Jacob Helton, Kristine Lachapelle, Kristi E. Lambert liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Wolf Spider
Location: Ohio, United States
April 30, 2015 1:16 am
I came across this beauty today that I believe to be an H. lenta. She was carrying an egg sack with her. I’m very curious to see the spiderlings and the mother’s care, so I set up a large escape proof terrarium to watch her in for a bit. Confirmation on her species would be well appreciated.
Signature: SillyToadGirl (Lexi)

Wolf Spider with Egg Sac

Wolf Spider with Egg Sac

Hi Lexi,
The manner with which the female Wolf Spider transports her egg sac is quite characteristic, dragging it about from her spinnerets, so your family identification is definitely correct.  According to BugGuide,
Hogna lenta is found in Ohio, so the species is a possibility, but we cannot be certain.  Perhaps one of our readers can confirm the species identity for you.

Ann Levitsky, Tynisha Koenigsaecker, Château Bettina liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Spider ID
Location: Salisbury NC
March 20, 2015 11:20 am
Hi,
I have been trying to ID this spider without any luck.
This was taken in Salisbury NC. in Sept 2014.
This was the only picture I could get because it was a fast spider, and was gone in a few seconds.
Thanks for any help.
Signature: David

Wolf Spider

Wolf Spider

Dear David,
This looks like some species of Wolf Spider to us based on the eye arrangement.  You can see a nice image of the eye pattern of a Wolf Spider on Animals Time where it states:  “Wolf spiders do not spin webs. They are known to run very fast. Wolf spiders usually hunt at night.” 

Alisha Bragg, Carol Love, Kathy Haines, Alfonso Moreno, Sue Dougherty, Andrea Leonard Drummond liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Spider ID please
Location: Scottburgh, KZN, South Africa
January 30, 2015 10:25 pm
Hi there, could you please help identify this spider, found in Scottburgh, kzn, South Africa.
Many thanks
Signature: Angie

Wolf Spider

Wolf Spider

Dear Angie,
Based on the eye arrangement pictured on BugGuide, we are confident that this is a Wolf Spider in the family Lycosidae.
  There are some excellent Wolf Spider images on iSpot.  A large Wolf Spider might bite a human if it is carelessly handled, but Wolf Spiders are not considered dangerous.

Hi Daniel
Thanks so much for the ID of the little wolf spider.
Appreciate the speedy answer :-)
Best regards
Angie

Kristi E. Lambert liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: My friend is a Peace Corps volunteer in Senegal and found THIS fascinating spider…
Location: Kedougou Region of Senegal
November 2, 2014 8:46 pm
Hi Bugman!
My friend is volunteering in the Kedougou Region of Senegal. He found this spider while walking on a dirt path at night walking from Wouridje back to Thianguey.
I know the photo is from at night, but any ideas as to what it might be? I thought perhaps a Hunstman spider?
Thanks so much!
Signature: Trying to help going to Senegal more appealing…

Possible Wolf Spider

Possible Wolf Spider

We do not believe this is a Huntsman Spider.  The shape reminds us more of a Wolf Spider, but alas, the eye pattern is not visible in your image.  Perhaps one of our readers can offer additional information.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination