Currently viewing the category: "Wolf Spiders"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Massive wolf spider?
Location: Bloomington, Indiana
March 30, 2014 1:45 pm
Hello! I found this massive spider back in October of 2007, in Bloomington, Indiana. I thought it was a plastic Halloween toy at first because it was so huge, but when my dog stepped on it (hence the missing leg) it ran, and I realized it was the biggest spider I’d ever seen in person. I tried to identify it, but couldn’t find a spider that had both an orange stripe and banded legs. My pictures are a little grainy since they were taken on an old cell phone camera, but the head-on one seems to show at least one huge eye. Also, for size reference, my shoes were a size 8! Thanks for reading and I hope you can identify this spider I’ve been wondering about for years.
Signature: Marina

Wolf Spider

Wolf Spider

Dear Marina,
We believe your Wolf Spider might be in the genus
Hogna, which include the largest North American Wolf Spiders.  See BugGuide for images from the genus Hogna.  We will try to get the opinion of Spider expert Mandy Howe.

Wolf Spider

Wolf Spider

Immediate Update
Continued searching led us to this image of
Tigrosa aspersa on Bugguide, and we believe it is a perfect match.  According to BugGuide:  “ Hogna(Tigrosa) aspersa females are 18 to 25 millimeters in length, and the males are 16 to 18 millimeters. They are similar to H. carolinensis in body color but have a distinct narrow line of yellow hairs on the carapace in the vicinity of the eyes. The legs are banded with a lighter brown color at the joints. The males are much lighter in color than the females, and only their third and fourth pairs of legs are banded with a lighter color.”

Wolf Spider

Wolf Spider

5:07 PM (2 hours ago)
Thank you!
Looking around on BugGuide, I think it might be in the Tigrosa family (maybe Tigrosa aspersa?) which used to be a part of Hogna, from what I can tell. This looks very much like it.
~Marina

Ah, looks like our emails crossed paths! Yes, I think that’s exactly it. Thank you so much! It’s great to know what it (she?) finally is.
~Marina

Based on what we have read on BugGuide, we believe this is a female spider as they are considerably larger than the males of the species.

Confirmation from Mandy Howe
Hi Daniel, sorry about the late reply again — but yep, I think Tigrosa aspersa is spot on for that female wolf spider. :-)

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Spider classification, please
Location: Columbia, SC
March 3, 2014 7:50 pm
Hi. Spotted a ground-dwelling spider in the yard today (see attached photo) and am curious as to what type.
Closest I can tell it could be a Funnel Weaver, Fishing Spider, or possibly in the Wolf Spider family.
Looking forward to your insightful findings.
Thanks!
Signature: C. Neil Scott

Wolf Spider

Wolf Spider

Dear C. Neil Scott,
We believe this is a Wolf Spider, but our second guess would be Nursery Web Spider which allows for the possibility of it being a Fishing Spider.  Your spider bears a resemblance to the
Gladicosa gulosa that is pictured on BugGuide.  We are going to contact Mandy Howe to see if she can assist in the identification.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What’s this bug
Location: Flint, MI
October 28, 2013 6:47 pm
Hello guys, I’m in Flint Michigan this photo was taken on 10-28-13. I work in a store with a warehouse that receives shipments from Colorado on a weekly bases. I see this spider a lot or places back In the warehouse. Everyone hear thinks they come from the shipments. Our whole staffed would love to know what this guy is.
Signature: JP

Wolf Spider with Spiderlings

Wolf Spider with Spiderlings

Hi JP,
Your request arrived just prior to us leaving the office for a spell, and that is something we are doing again soon.  We postdate letters to go live in our absence, and we do not answer mail while we are away.  We apologize for the tardy response, but we figured that since this Wolf Spider sighting was not an isolated event, you might still want to know the answer.  Wolf Spider are considered harmless.  They are hunting spiders that do not build webs to snare prey.  The common name comes because of the way they pounce on their prey.  This is not a guy, but a gal.  Female Wolf Spiders are very maternal.  They drag their egg sacs with them and when the eggs hatch, the young Spiderlings crawl onto the female’s back and ride around for a short period of time before dispersing.  If you look closely, you can see the Spiderlings in your image.  This may be a Rabid Wolf Spider,
Rabidosa rabida, which is picture on BugGuide.  Once again, despite the name, this is a harmless, local species for you.  Your request will post live to our site next week.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this bug!!!!
Location: Sydney
December 12, 2013 5:54 pm
Howdy,
My wife took a photo of this and after a bit of searching, could it be a Spider Wasp?
I have 2 kids under the age of 2 who love to play outside, are they a pest and should i try to exterminate them?
Signature: Michael

Spider Wasp stalks Spider

Spider Wasp stalks Spider

Dear Michael,
You are correct that this is a Spider Wasp, and it is stalking a Spider in one of your photos.  You do not need to fear this Spider Wasp attacking your children unless they look like spiders, which we highly doubt.  Female Spider Wasps are more concerned about providing food for their broods than they are about stinging innocent children, though we would not entirely discount the possibility of getting stung if the Spider Wasps are handled or stepped on.  Again, we want to stress that they are not aggressive toward humans and we don’t believe there is any need to take the steps to exterminate them, which would probably be nearly impossible anyways.  Social Wasps pose a much greater threat because they try to defend their nests, while solitary wasps like Spider Wasps do not have the same defense instincts.  We will try to identify both the wasp and the spider after we do some yardwork in our own neglected garden.  Alas, you photo does lack critical detail, but the spider appears to be a Wolf Spider.  We have nice photos in our archive of a Spider Wasp preying upon a Wolf Spider.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Swimming Pool Spider
Location: Palm Desert, CA, backyard pool
November 13, 2013 6:00 pm
Hi Daniel,
Yesterday, I was sitting on the edge of a swimming pool with 2 friends in Palm Desert, when one of the dogs jumped in the pool. A very large spider washed out from under the gray concrete ledge of the pool, right beneath my legs. We all jumped up immediately!
The spider was about 3” diameter across its legs. It was the exact color of the gray concrete. Its body was quite substantial. It seemed to be very comfortable floating around and walking on the water.
We watched for a while, as I took photos on my phone. This was the best (close up was cropped from the wide shot). When threatened, it would pull its legs in looking just like a seed pod floating on the water. I had to marvel at its clever adaptations to this pool. On a look around the pool there were good size crevices between the concrete deck & the mottled blue-gray tile where it could lie in wait for its prey. I suspect it’s an ambush predator. There was also a Ficus-like hedge that would produce beans nearby. It was a typical grass and trees So Cal Suburban backyard – not desert landscaping.
Since dogs and people were in the pool, the homeowner rescued the spider and placed it in the nearby hedge. I’m sure it would find its way back to the pool by nightfall.
Signature: Diane E

P.S.  Almost forgot – one more thing it was a saltwater swimming pool.

Possibly Fishing Spider

Wolf Spider

Nov 12
Hi Daniel,
Same color as the pool deck was lying in wait under the ledge of deck.    With legs it had a 3″ diameter & seemed perfectly happy swimming floating in friend”s pool in Palm Desert.
Attached
Diane Edwardson

or more generally a Nursery Web Spider

Wolf Spider [our crop]

Hi Diane,
Please resubmit using our standard form:  http://www.whatsthatbug.com/ask-whats-that-bug/
We want to post this photo but we would like any additional information you are able to provide.
Thanks
Daniel

Hi again Diane,
Thanks so much for resending your identification request with such a detailed account of this spider sighting in Palm Desert, California.  This sure looks to us like a Fishing Spider, but we can’t help but to wonder if it is
Trechalea gertschi, so we are copying Mandy Howe, an editor at BugGuide, to get her opinion.  We had already cropped the image you sent originally while we waited for you to resend your request.

Ed. Note:  Mandy Howe was kind enough to identify this Wolf Spider as Arctosa littoralis.

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Huntsman?
Location: Pretoria North
November 5, 2013 3:43 pm
Hi, I came home tonight to find a new addition to the family. From other photos I believe it is a Huntsman but would appreciate confirmation. This guy/lady quite liked posing for the camera and I was able to get a few nice photos with my phone.
Signature: Regards, Peter

Wolf Spider

Wolf Spider

Dear Peter,
In our opinion, this is a Wolf Spider.  They are considered harmless, though big individuals might bite if provoked.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination