Currently viewing the category: "Wolf Spiders"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Black wolf spider?
Location: Troy, VA
September 14, 2016 8:43 am
I saw this spider last night. It was up high at the junction between the exterior wall and a porch roof. I didn’t see any evidence of a web. I think I can just barely see a pale stripe running along its head. We have lots of wolf spiders in the area, but I have never seen one with this color variation before. It was a big spider, but I can’t really say for sure its size as it was quite far up the wall. Could this be a black wolf spider? I apologize for the indifferent quality of the photograph.
thanks for an invaluable website.
Signature: Grace Pedalino

Wolf Spider

Wolf Spider

Dear Grace,
We agree that your spider looks structurally like a Wolf Spider, and we agree with you that the black coloration is unusual.  While we cannot state for certain that the species is correct, your individual does resemble
Allocosa funerea which is pictured on BugGuide.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Orange body/Blue wing Wasp – dragging/burying spider
Location: Ocala, FL
September 8, 2016 5:45 pm
Saw this the other day and at first thought the spider had the bug, until the bug ran off in circles for a second and then went back and started dragging the spider to a small hole in the sand. He then started to bury the spider. I actually have video, so these are stills. Just wondering what it is and whether or not it is a danger to any pets (assuming you don’t have pet spiders).
Signature: Ginger

Spider Wasp with Wolf Spider

Spider Wasp with Wolf Spider

Hi Ginger,
We believe your Spider Wasp is
Tachypompilus ferrugineus based on images and range information on BugGuide.  Of the genus, BugGuide notes:  “Adults are often found taking nectar from flowers (Daucus, Pastinaca, and Eryngium). Females provision nests mainly with Lycosids.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Wolf spider with babies
Location:  Unknown
September 1, 2016 9:20 am
I just want to tell you how much I love you guys. I’m a biology student and though bugs aren’t on my love list the photos and stories I’ve read have really brought me around. I’ve included footage of a wolf spider with back babies being released by me in a field (my “website” link). I hope you can use it on your site, or at least find enjoyment in it. Keep up the great work!
Website: https://youtu.be/5ekYQ2O5Hlw
Signature: Jennifer

Wolf Spider with Spiderlings

Wolf Spider with Spiderlings

Dear Jennifer,
We are including a screen shot of your Wolf Spider with her spiderlings vidoe in our posting and we are linking to your video.  We are also tagging you with the Bug Humanitarian Award for releasing this Wolf Spider back into the wild.  Wolf Spiders are the only spiders that carry their young about, though this behavior is found in other arachnids including Scorpions.  Can you please provide us with a location for your sighting?

Awesome! I didn’t know that about the scorpions, it’s great to know.
This spider was found in Cape Coral, Florida. The wildlife down here is absolutely amazing, everywhere you look there’s something crawling about. I’m so honored that you liked my video.
Thanks!

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Looking for identification
Location: Denver, Colorado, in a basement, near a window sill
August 23, 2016 9:25 pm
Hello! I found a spider about 3/4 inch in diameter. It is all black, with a dorsal that is covered in tiny white polka dots. The dorsal is very lumpy. I’ve never seen anything like it and can’t seem to find anything that resembles it online. Unfortunately, I didn’t get a great look at its eyes as I was afraid to get too close since I don’t know what it is
Signature: Michaelanne Stuhr

Wolf Spider with Spiderlings

Wolf Spider with Spiderlings

Dear Michaelanne,
The only spiders that care for young in this manner, by carrying them about riding on the abdomen, are harmless Wolf Spiders.  A large Wolf Spider might bite if threatened, and approaching a female with a brood would constitute a threat to her young, but the bite is not considered serious to humans.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Un-identified flying bug
Location: Boise, Idaho
August 2, 2016 7:19 pm
My wife spotted this bug carrying a large wolf spider up the inside wall if the sprinkler valve box. The spider was still twitching which has lead me to believe this was the killer. I live in Boise Idaho. This was seen today August 1st. Sorry the photos are lousy, I didn’t dare get closer.
Signature: Nick

Spider Wasp preys upon Wolf Spider

Spider Wasp preys upon Wolf Spider

Dear Nick,
Despite the poor quality of your images, this Spider Wasp,
Tachypompilus ferrugineus, is quite recognizable.  The reason the Wolf Spider was still twitching is that it is still alive.  This Spider Wasp will not be eating this Wolf Spider.  Like most wasps, Spider Wasps feed upon nectar from flowers and other sweets like overly ripe fruit.  This living Wolf Spider has been paralyzed so that it can provide a living food source, meaning fresh meat, for the larva that hatches from the egg the Spider Wasp will lay on the Wolf Spider once she has dragged it to the underground nest she has excavated.  According to MOBugs:  “The females of this species are expert spider hunters. They seek large species of spiders such as wolf spiders to paralyze. They will sting the spider with a fast acting venom designed to subdue their prey, but not kill it. She will then drag the unfortunate victim to a safe spot and secret it away out of sight. She will then lay her eggs on the spider and leave to hunt for more victims. It takes a few days for the eggs to hatch and during that time the spider will remain very much alive, just in a constant state of paralytic motionlessness. When the eggs hatch they will feed on the spider so lovingly provided for it by its mother. ” 

Spider Wasp preys upon Wolf Spider

Spider Wasp preys upon Wolf Spider

Sounds horrible! Thanks for the quick reply.
Nick

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Hefty spider
Location: Kentucky
April 18, 2016 3:05 pm
I was turning dirt in the garden yesterday and this hefty spider ran out of the dirt, across my shoe and started up my pants leg. I shook her(?) out, caught her in a plastic container and moved her to a stump where she’d be out of the way and not get stepped on. Her body, counting legs, is wider than my thumb and as long. She’s a heavy bodied babe. She leapt off of the stump and actually made a thump when she landed. I’m guessing she’s some kind of a trap door spider, but I really don’t know, and I’d like to be able to put a name on her. Could you help, please?
Signature: Gin, who likes golden orb weavers better

Wolf Spider

Wolf Spider

Dear Gin,
This is not a Trapdoor Spider.  It is a Wolf Spider, possibly a Carolina Wolf Spider,
Hogna carolinensis, which is pictured on BugGuide.

Wolf Spider

Wolf Spider

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination