Currently viewing the category: "Wall Spiders"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: I noticed you didn’t have any Oecobius sp. (wall spider) pictures
Location: Houston area, but they are pretty widespread
September 16, 2013 8:16 pm
These are pretty small spiders, so there is a chance nobody has noticed them to be identified.
Here are the pictures (I had to resize them, they were too big)
#1 is probably a female
#2 is a male
Signature: The giant cookie

Wall Spider

Wall Spider

Dear The giant cookie,
Thank you so much for bringing this gap in our coverage to our attention.  We have created a Wall Spiders subcategory just to house your posting.  According to BugGuide, they are found near:  “houses, stucco walls, under bark on trees and grape vines, rocks.”  Perhaps only negligent housekeepers who rarely dust, like our editorial staff, are the only folks who would notice Wall Spiders in the home.  We have been aware of them for years because it seems they are among the only creatures in Los Angeles that feed upon the invasive Argentine Ants, though the ant population far exceeds the spider population.  Wall Spiders often create lairs in crevices around windows, and in seldom disturbed corners of rooms.  We are thrilled with your excellent photos of this often overlooked Wall Spider.

Male Wall Spider

Male Wall Spider

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Strange spider
Location: Danilovgrad, Montenegro, Europe
December 10, 2012 9:39 am
I found this spider last summer, it’s about 2-2.5 cm long (with legs), and is often found of ceilings outside the houses. I never saw them inside the house. During the day, it’s dormant in some kind of web sac (as seen on image). Is it some species of ladybird spiders?
Signature: aalexaa

Wall Spider

Hi aalexaa,
The five yellow spots and the pronounced spinnerets at the tip of the abdomen are distinguishing features that should make this spider easy to identify. We do not believe it is a Ladybird Spider, but we do suspect it is some type of hunting spider, meaning it does not build a web to snare prey.  We will post your photo and we hope to have an identification soon.

Update:
Thanks to a comment by Cesar Crash, we believe this is
Uroctea durandi, one of the Wall Spiders in the family Oecobiidae according to the Encyclopedia of Life.

Thanks! Now when I know the latin name, it was not hard to find some more information about the spider. It’s common Mediterranean species, although, at least in Danilovgrad, that’s not the case. Maybe because of somewhat colder weather during winter than in coastal area.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination