Currently viewing the category: "Tarantulas and Trapdoor Spiders"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Spider from Sierra Nevadas
Location: Grass Valley CA
May 1, 2016 3:35 pm
Hi there, this guy came waltzing into our garage last night, I can’t figure out if it’s a wolf spider or ebony taranchula, love to know your thoughts.
Signature: Ryan

California Ebony Tarantula

California Ebony Tarantula

Dear Ryan,
This is most definitely NOT a Wolf Spider and after doing some research, we are concluding you are correct that it is a California Ebony Tarantula or at least another member of the genus
Aphonopelma.  Your individual is a male.  Male Tarantulas are frequently found wandering in search of a mate.  Female Tarantulas are more sedentary.  News from the Bernard Field Station has some marvelous images and you can also find similar looking individuals on this BugGuide posting and this BugGuide posting. 

California Ebony Tarantula

California Ebony Tarantula

Thank you so much for your reply, I am a teacher and I am really looking forward to sharing this with my class and encouraging kids to let them live in their gardens as they are awesome for the ecosystem.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Black spider
Location: Benoni East Rand Gauteng
March 26, 2016 1:00 am
Hi Bugman,
Before we moved into our new house one night, we spoted a strange looking black spider in the house. I’ve never seen one like this before, can you tell me what this is?
Signature: Boogie

Probably Trapdoor Spider

Probably Trapdoor Spider

Dear Boogie,
This looks like a primitive Mygalomorph Spider, a member of the Infraorder Mygalomorphae, the group that includes Tarantulas and Trapdoor Spiders.  We believe your individual is a Trapdoor Spider.  It does not look too dissimilar from the Horned Trapdoor Spider,
Stasimopus filmeri, and other members of the genus pictured on iSpot.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Possible Mygalomorph in Monmouth, OR
Location: Monmouth, Oregon
February 12, 2016 11:12 pm
Hello!
I’m a hobby arachnologist and I frequently get friends sending me pics of spiders they’ve taken and asking what they are. Usually I can pretty quickly ID them but this little beauty is a bit of a stumper.
It looks like he has palps, but it could be my imagination. Those spots are familiar to me but I can’t find a ready ID. I was thinking Mygalomorph, but they’re so uncommon in Oregon, I must be crazy!
Signature: Luke S

Trapdoor Spider

Trapdoor Spider

Dear Luke,
We agree with much of what you stated, but not everything.  We do agree that this is a Mygalomorph and that it does have palps, indicating it is a male.  Where we disagree is that Mygalomorphs are uncommon in Oregon.  BugGuide has several genera of Trapdoor Spiders found in the Pacific Northwest, including
Antrodiaetus pacificus, which looks like a pretty good match considering this BugGuide posting.  We also have our doubts that you are crazy, but we cannot be entirely certain.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: brown spider!
Location: malibu, california
February 6, 2016 12:30 am
hi! we found this cool spider on the street between dunes/beach in malibu, california. tried googling and couldn’t figure out what it was
Signature: Thanks so much! Erica

Trapdoor Spider

Southern Coastal Dune Trapdoor Spider

Dear Erica,
We immediately recognized your spider as a Trapdoor Spider, but we are very excited as we believe we have correctly identified it as a Southern Coastal Dune Trapdoor Spider,
Aptostichus simus, based on this BugGuide image.  All indications are that this species is endemic to coastal dunes in Southern California.  According to an online article we located:  “The tradpoor spider Aptostichus simus inhabits coastal dunes of southern California and the California Channel Islands (Ramirez 1995).  It lives in burrows concentrated in and about stands of native dune vegetation and extending into the dunes amid litter and the root systems of the plants.”

Thanks so much for the reply! So interesting to learn! :) I just moved out here from NJ and can’t wait to discover more things I didn’t find there!

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Is this spider dangerous?
Location: Zambia
January 28, 2016 4:23 am
Hi, we’ve been living in central Zambia in the bushy outskirts of a town for 8 months now and today was the first time I’ve seen one of these kind of spiders. It’s tarantula looking and about 2 to 3 inches at full span. We have children here too which causes me even more concern and worry if they would be tempted to approach one. Can you please tell me if they bite or are poisonous please?
Signature: Many thanks for your help

Tarantula: Ceratogyrus meridionalis

Tarantula: Ceratogyrus meridionalis

Your gorgeous Tarantula is Ceratogyrus meridionalis. which we identified on BirdSpiders.  Tarantulas are not aggressive, but they can give a painful, though not generally serious, bite if carelessly handled.  Teach your children while they are young to have respect for lower beasts.

Tarantula

Tarantula

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Southwestern Spider
Location: Phoenix Arizona Metro
January 17, 2016 7:56 pm
Somebody found this spider in a pool filter in Arizona and it doesn’t resemble anything we have seen here before.
Signature: GB

Trapdoor Spider

Trapdoor Spider

Dear GB,
We believe this Trapdoor Spider is most likely a male in the genus
Ummidia.  With winter rains, male Trapdoor Spiders wander in search of a mate a frequently fall into pools.  Compare your image, which is most likely swollen with water after drowning, to this BugGuide image.

Daniel,
Thank you for your response. I agree with your assessment that this critter had been submerged for a while, making it difficult to identify.
Seems ironic that a lot of humanoid males also wander into pools in search of a mate.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination