Currently viewing the category: "Tarantulas and Trapdoor Spiders"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Spider Found In Nelson, BC, Canada . Never Seen It Before
Location: Nelson, BC, Canada
April 11, 2014 4:57 pm
today during a walk i stumbled apon a spider that made my skin crawl just looking at it!! i have lived in Canada my whole life and have never seen one like this. unfortunatly some of these pictures were taken as it posed “belly up” but its legs are tucked and short and has some yellow marking on the lower underside.. im very curious into discovering what type of spider it is! please help
Signature: Regan

Cork-Lid Trapdoor Spider

Cork-Lid Trapdoor Spider

Dear Regan,
This is a Cork-Lid Trapdoor Spider in the genus Ummidia, and despite it making your skin crawl, it is a harmless species.  The spots on the underside of the abdomen are quite distinctive.  You can see a matching image on BugGuide.
  Spring rains may have flushed it from its burrow.

Cork-Lid Trapdoor Spider

Cork-Lid Trapdoor Spider

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: running on a trail
Location: Santa Rosa, California
April 1, 2014 7:10 pm
Greetings,
I was running on a trail in Southern California and came across this…… bug spider guy/gal. I stopped and noticed it was actually being attacked by an army of ants. Never seeing a spider this big in California I decided to pick it up with a stick. I managed to get the ants off and relocate the creature to a safer location.
Signature: Jamie

Trapdoor Spider

Trapdoor Spider

Hi Jamie,
This beautiful spider is a Trapdoor Spider, but we are not certain of the genus or species.  It looks very similar to this
Aptostichus stanfordianus that is pictured on BugGuide.

Trapdoor Spider

Trapdoor Spider

Thank you! It was quite beautiful and intriguing.

WE forgot to tag your posting with the Bug Humanitarian Award for rescuing this Trapdoor Spider from the Ants.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: what kind of spider is this?
Location: east bay area 94509
March 3, 2014 1:50 pm
Hi. We found this spider dead in our garage this am and we have never seen anything like it. I would imagine he was at least as big as a 50 cent piece when alive, if not bigger. I really just want to make sure he’s not poisonous because we have small children.
Signature: jaimie

Dead Tarantula

Dead Tarantula

Hi Jaimie,
This is a Tarantula, and they do have venom.  Teach your children to respect Tarantulas since they live in your area.  The bite of a North American Tarantula might be painful and result in local swelling and tenderness, but it is not considered especially dangerous to humans.  Tarantulas really need to be provoked to bite, and there is little chance of that happening with this dead Tarantula.  More of a threat is the irritation caused by the utricating hairs.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Spider
Location: Sonoma , Ca.
January 28, 2014 8:37 pm
Hi,
I live in Sonoma, Ca. in the Boyes Hot Springs area. I found this spider in my water meter volt. I would appreciate your help in identifying it. It’s @ 1- 3/4” long and dark brown in color, it had no web that I noticed. Thank you for your help.
Signature: Rigobert gutierrez

Tarantula

Tarantula

Hi Rigobert,
This sure looks like a Tarantula to us.  The eye arrangement, which is an important criterion for the classification of spiders, looks similar to the eye arrangement of the Tarantula on the PHotos of Utah Spiders site.

Tarantula closeup

Tarantula closeup

Hi Daniel,
Thank you so much for your help. Additionally, can you please tell me what I should feed it.
Thanks again,
Rigo

Hi again Rigo,
That is a cricket with the Tarantula in the photo, and crickets make splendid food for spiders.  You can buy crickets at a pet store.  About.com has some information that might be helpful to you.

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: California trapdoor?
Location: Olympia,WA
January 1, 2014 7:07 pm
Howdy! I was rollerblading along a trail by my house and I saw this big guy stomping his way across the path. I skidded to a hault and he did too. Being a spider lover, I took some pictures. Afterwards I scooped him up and set him on the other side of the trail. When I got home the only thing that I could find that looks anything like him was a California trapdoor spider. I think he is quite a jog from his home, but after doing some research it appears that there have been other sightings of this spider in Washington. I love your website, and I hope the pictures help you identify the dude.
Signature: ~Marly

Trapdoor Spider

Trapdoor Spider

Hi Marly,
While this is a Trapdoor Spider, it is a different species than the California Trapdoor Spider.  We found a very good match to a female Folding Door Trapdoor Spider,
Antrodiaetus pacificus, that is posted to BugGuide.  There is no additional information on this species on BugGuide.  We believe it is unusual to find a female Trapdoor Spider roaming.  The females which are more long lived are usually sedentary, and the shorter lived males are the ones that wander in search of a mate.

Trapdoor Spider

Trapdoor Spider

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Spider ID
Location: (North) Eagle Rock
December 17, 2013 3:41 pm
Dear Bugman,
First of all, I can’t tell you enough how pleased I was to come across your site, and even more so to learn that you’re a local Angeleno!!
Can you help me identify this spider?? My first thought was a juvenile tarantula, but I’m now leaning toward a Crevice Weaver upon further research. I have lived in this area (Pasadena/Eagle Rock) my whole life and have never seen a spider this impressive. See the attached photo.
Signature: Dr. Jones

Male California Trapdoor Spider

Male California Trapdoor Spider

Good Morning Dr. Jones,
Greetings from Northeast Los Angeles, the best part of our city.  Your first thought was actually a bit closer taxonomically, as this is a male California Trapdoor Spider,
Bothriocyrtum californicum.  Trapdoor Spiders are classified with Tarantulas and other primitive spiders as Mygalomorphs.  Due to habitat destruction, California Trapdoor Spiders are not as common as they once were in the Los Angeles basin.  They tend to live on sunny, south facing slopes, and much of the land in northeast Los Angeles that fits that description was built on over various construction booms in the past century.  You are lucky to have much open space in Eagle Rock along the 134 freeway, and we expect there is a healthy population of California Trapdoor Spiders in them there hills.  Sexually dimorphic Female California Trapdoor Spiders are long lived and rarely encountered as they do not leave their burrows unless forcibly evicted.  Males wander in search of mates, and they are frequently encountered after the winter rains begin.  Sadly, many male California Trapdoor Spiders fall into swimming pools and drown.  BugGuide does provide this interesting bit of trivia:  “According to Guinness World Records, as of 2009, this is the strongest spider. It has been able to resist a force 38 times its own weight when defending its trapdoor. This equates to a man trying to hold a door closed while it is being pulled on the other side by a small jet plane!(1) Unfortunately, the Guinness book doesn’t mention if it’s the strongest North American spider or if it’s the strongest in the world. Also, one thing to think about is whether or not every spider’s strength has been measured. I guess one can safely say that the information is flawed in that aspect, but it still asserts the fact that these spiders ARE very strong.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination