Currently viewing the category: "Tarantulas and Trapdoor Spiders"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

October 18, 2018
Aloha Daniel –
Thought you’d enjoy this story, if you’ve not seen it before.
http://news.yahoo.com/goliath-encounter-puppy-sized-spider-surprises-scientist-rainforest-125720953.html

Ed. Note:  Piotr Naskrecki frequently helps us identify exotic Katydids.

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination
Trapdoor Spider, we believe

Trapdoor Spider, we believe

Subject: Unidentified Kentucky Spider
Location: Louisville, Kentucky.
October 12, 2014 6:25 pm
A friend and I found a spider that we can’t identify, we’ve lived in Louisville all our lives and are outdoorsman and we’ve never seen any spider like it before. It looks a lot bulkier than anything we’ve had around here, almost like a small tarantula but we can’t find anything similar to it anywhere online. We were thinking maybe someone let a bunch of infant tarantula’s loose from a pregnant pet after they hatched and we found one.
Signature: Regards, Stephen.

Hi Stephen,
We wish your image had more detail, because though we believe we have correctly identified your spider as a Trapdoor Spider in the genus
Antrodiaetus, we are not entirely certain.  Your individual looks very much like this individual posted to BugGuide that was found in Pennsylvania.  Along with Tarantulas, Trapdoor Spiders are classified in the Infraorder Mygalomorphae, the most primitive group of spiders.  Another, less likely possibility is a female Southern House Spider, also pictured on BugGuide,  which BugGuide describes as:  “Females are frequently mistaken for small tarantulas or trapdoor spiders. Males are often mistaken for recluse spiders (Loxosceles). This is a totally harmless species that builds “messy” webs emanating from crevices, often on the outside of homes.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination
Tarantula

Tarantula

Subject: Big spider in Arizona
Location: Central Arizona
October 11, 2014 5:38 pm
Dear What’s That Bug?,
While backpacking in the Mazatzal Wilderness near Payson, Arizona I saw this amazing spider! I thought it was my first tarantula, but after looking up pictures of tarantulas, I’m not sure. It was in early October in the morning and it was walking across the path. I managed to take two pictures, but it was moving pretty fast for a spider, so they aren’t great.
Signature: Jason

Tarantula

Tarantula

Hi Jason,
This is definitely a Tarantula, and our best guess is that it is a Desert Blond Tarantula based on images posted to bugGuide.

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Tarantula maybe
Location: San Antonio, TX
September 19, 2014 6:16 am
Can you help me identify this spider I found floating in my pool. When I got it out I was surprised it was alive. It is about 2 inches long and the body is 1/2 inch wide. I did not see it spread out its legs. Is it dangerous?
Signature: Lisa

Trapdoor Spider

Trapdoor Spider

Dear Lisa,
This is a Trapdoor Spider, and though it is theoretically not a Tarantula, it is classified with the Tarantulas in the infraorder Mygalomorphae, and according to BugGuide, the Mygalomorphs are:  “Easily distinguished from araneomorphs by two pairs of booklungs; fangs and chelicerae are parallel to the body axis.”
  BugGuide also notes:  “This is a more primitive group of spiders which includes the infamous tarantulas, primarily represented by members of Family Theraphosidae. Other familiar members include the trapdoor spiders and purseweb spiders.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Unusual Black Spider
Location: Vancouver Island, British Columbia
September 13, 2014 11:43 am
Hello Bugman! I was walking down the street and I saw this guy puttering along the sidewalk out of the corner of my eye. At first I thought it was a large black beetle but upon closer inspection it turned out to be a rather large and unusual spider. I’ve lived on Vancouver Island my whole life and have come across a lot of our native spiders which have all looked pretty similar, but this one looks nothing like anything I’ve ever seen in the wild! He/she was quite meaty looking and fairly large. Any ideas about what spider this is and where he/she could have come from?
Signature: Britt

Folding Door Spider

Folding Door Spider

Dear Britt,
We are confident that your Trapdoor Spider is a native male Folding Door Spider in the genus
Antrodiaetus thanks to this comparable image posted to Bugguide.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Big Spider Bear Lake Idaho
Location: Fish Haven, Idaho
September 13, 2014 9:47 pm
Saw this big spider on our walk today near Bear Lake on the Idaho side. It was sitting (standing?) in the road. It is mid-September, leaves are changing, and has been a wet fall. Is it venomous? Dangerous? Tried to talk my friend into putting her hand down beside it for a size reference but she refused…something about being afraid of spiders. It was bigger than a silver dollar but smaller than the toy poodle walking with us.
Signature: Thanks

Trapdoor Spider

Trapdoor Spider

We believe this is a Trapdoor Spider, but we have not had any luck identifying it on BugGuide.  We hope one of our readers will provide us with something more specific.  Large Trapdoor Spiders might bite if carelessly handled, but they are not considered dangerous to humans.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination