Currently viewing the category: "Tarantulas and Trapdoor Spiders"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: unknown arachnid
Location: Parker Texas
August 4, 2014 9:40 pm
I see a lot of bugs, thanks to my occupation I’m relieved to find this website.
Try this one guys.
Found in Parker Texas, in a garage. Mid summer, plenty of tall trees around the area.
Signature: -thank you kindly -Deej

Wafer-Lid Trapdoor Spider

Wafer-Lid Trapdoor Spider

Hi Deej,
This is some species of Trapdoor Spider, and we believe it is a male.  It looks to us like it might be a Wafer-Lid Trapdoor Spider in the genus
Myrmekiaphila based on images posted to BugGuide

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: California Tarantula?
Location: Thousand Oaks CA
July 6, 2014 9:41 pm
Thank you for such an interesting and informative site!
I went for a walk with my husband and kids tonight- a hot July evening in Thousand Oaks CA, and my husband spotted this crawling up a curb.
I tried looking through your site for anything similar, but it didn’t seem to match anything I could find. It was almost as big as my hand, and the main part of the body appeared to be hairless, but the “butt” was hairy, and narrower than the main part of the body.
Signature: Kay

Tarantula

Tarantula

Hi Kay,
Tarantula sightings in much of Southern California are becoming rarer and rarer due to habitat loss, and now they are only seen in areas that abut natural open space.  Most North American Tarantulas are in the genus
Aphonopelma which is represented on BugGuide.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Red Legged Purse Web spider (male)
Location: Eno River State Park, NC
June 18, 2014 8:13 am
I was hiking with my son at the Eno River State Park in North Carolina. We discovered this spider crawling on the ground. It actually paused for the photo. It was bigger than a quarter.
I think I identified it as a male red legged purse web spider. It has rather large fangs.
Does it bite? Will it’s fangs pierce human skin?
I understand that they make silk funnels on a tree or rock face and then hide behind the silk wall waiting for prey. As the prey enters the funnel, the spider lunges and bites through the silk wall.
It’s quite a cool spider.
Signature: James Chamberlain

Red Legged Purseweb Spider

Red Legged Purseweb Spider

Dear James,
Thanks so much for sending in your image of a male Red Legged Purseweb Spider,
Sphodros rufipes.  The information you have is consistent with what we have read.  We have not read anything regarding the bite of a Red Legged Purseweb Spider, however, the fangs do look formidable and we are guessing they might be able to bite a human, though in general, Spiders in the Infraorder Mygalomorphae, which include Tarantulas and Trapdoor Spiders, are not aggressive toward humans.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Black Purse Web Spider (Sphodros niger ?)
Location: Cherokee CO, NC
May 25, 2014 7:02 am
I suppose that it’s the breeding season for these little spiders.; I managed to find a few scurrying through the woods about the same time last year, but didn’t have a camera on hand to photograph them. Speaking of photos, I’m afraid that my camera was inadequate. The spider was constantly on the move. About every 15 seconds it would pause for a brief moment before continuing on; my camera’s autofocus wasn’t fast enough, and the pictures were taken only milliseconds after the spider began moving again.
Signature: Jacob H.

Black Purseweb Spider

Black Purseweb Spider

Dear Jacob,
Please do not make any excuses for your images, which we think are wonderful.  Though we have images on our site of the Red Legged Purseweb Spider, your images are the first we have received from the related Black Purseweb Spider.  This individual is a male, and you have most likely documented his search for a mate.  Purseweb Spiders are fascinating creatures, and more images of the Black Purseweb Spider can be found on BugGuide.

Black Purseweb Spider

Black Purseweb Spider

Black Purseweb Spider

Black Purseweb Spider

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Spider Found In Nelson, BC, Canada . Never Seen It Before
Location: Nelson, BC, Canada
April 11, 2014 4:57 pm
today during a walk i stumbled apon a spider that made my skin crawl just looking at it!! i have lived in Canada my whole life and have never seen one like this. unfortunatly some of these pictures were taken as it posed “belly up” but its legs are tucked and short and has some yellow marking on the lower underside.. im very curious into discovering what type of spider it is! please help
Signature: Regan

Cork-Lid Trapdoor Spider

Cork-Lid Trapdoor Spider

Dear Regan,
This is a Cork-Lid Trapdoor Spider in the genus Ummidia, and despite it making your skin crawl, it is a harmless species.  The spots on the underside of the abdomen are quite distinctive.  You can see a matching image on BugGuide.
  Spring rains may have flushed it from its burrow.

Cork-Lid Trapdoor Spider

Cork-Lid Trapdoor Spider

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: running on a trail
Location: Santa Rosa, California
April 1, 2014 7:10 pm
Greetings,
I was running on a trail in Southern California and came across this…… bug spider guy/gal. I stopped and noticed it was actually being attacked by an army of ants. Never seeing a spider this big in California I decided to pick it up with a stick. I managed to get the ants off and relocate the creature to a safer location.
Signature: Jamie

Trapdoor Spider

Trapdoor Spider

Hi Jamie,
This beautiful spider is a Trapdoor Spider, but we are not certain of the genus or species.  It looks very similar to this
Aptostichus stanfordianus that is pictured on BugGuide.

Trapdoor Spider

Trapdoor Spider

Thank you! It was quite beautiful and intriguing.

WE forgot to tag your posting with the Bug Humanitarian Award for rescuing this Trapdoor Spider from the Ants.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination