Currently viewing the category: "Tarantulas and Trapdoor Spiders"
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Subject: Id spider please
Location: Table Rock Lake, Branson West, Missouri
July 8, 2015 9:14 am
Found in side yard at Table Rock Lake, Branson West , Missouri.
8 July 2015
WHAT IS IT?
Thanks
Signature: Les Johnson

Trapdoor Spider

Trapdoor Spider

Dear Les,
This is a Trapdoor Spider in the genus
Ummidia, and you can compare your image to this image on BugGuide.  Though Trapdoor Spiders are capable of biting, they are not aggressive and their bite is not considered dangerous.  According to BugGuide:  “Dig tunnel in ground and seal with a silk-hinged lid. They hide under this lid and make forays out when prey is sensed, presumably by vibration. Males are often found wandering in late spring, presumably looking for mates.”

THANK YOU VERY MUCH !!!
I thought so. He is probably a male as he was just walking along. He tried to run but after i persisted on stopping him for a pic, he just sat there.  About silver dollar sized. Posing for me. Used flash on iphone. Good pic. Thank you very much!
Les

Anna Fletcher liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: what species?
Location: Ramona, CA
June 23, 2015 7:15 pm
I found this little cutey crawling across my living room floor last night. I was wondering what species of tarantula it is. So that I can give it the best care possible.
Thanks!
Signature: Erica

Tarantula

Tarantula

Dear Erica,
Your Tarantula looks to us to be
Aphonopelma eutylenum based on the images and range provided on BugGuide.  Other than habitat, we don’t believe the care of Tarantulas differs much between species.  Obviously desert species have different habitat needs than jungle species.  We would suggest you consult a local pet store that specializes in arthropods and also that you consult some online forums.  We always believe wild creatures are best left in the wild.

Tarantula

Tarantula

Alisha Bragg, Jessica M. Schemm, Ann Levitsky, Heather Duggan-Christensen liked this post
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Subject: Brown spider photo at butt lake northern california
Location: Northern California Butt Lake
July 1, 2015 7:01 pm
Dear bug an a friend took the picture while we were camping just wondering what it is. Thank you.
Signature: Wondering about the bug

Folding Door Spider

Folding Door Spider

We believe this is a Folding Door Spider in the genus Antrodiaetus, and it really looks to us to resemble the female Antrodiaetus gertschi that is pictured on BugGuide by a single sighting in Northern California.  You can try browsing through the genus page on BugGuide to see if some other species more closely resembles your individual.

 

Heather Duggan-Christensen, Alisha Bragg, Jessica M. Schemm, Anna Fletcher liked this post
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Subject: Huge black funnel web spider need identification
Location: Tumbaco, Ecuador
May 9, 2015 11:23 am
This pretty spider lives outside my brother’s house (came with the house). She’s black and the size of his hand (+_ 8 in / 20 cm). He tried getting it identified with no luck. Any help identifying what type is highly appreciated and welcome! They call her “viper” and she’s the guardian dog 😉
PS: I was told it could be in the Dipluridae family, either a Diplura or Linothele. It looks a lot like the spanish funnel web spider except it’s 3 times larger…
Signature: buglady

Large Spider

Unknown Tarantula

Dear buglady,
The size you have stated seems to indicate a Tarantula.  Those spinnerets at the end of the abdomen are impressively long, and that is probably going to be a significant indication of the proper identification, though this image of an Ecuadorean Tarantula with long spinnerets from our archive has never been properly identified.  A close-up of the eye pattern would also be of tremendous assistance.
  Unless we hear otherwise, we are going to speculate that this is some species of Tarantula.  According to the American Museum of Natural History, the family Dipluridae is classified with the Mgyalomorphs, primitive spiders that include Tarantulas and Trapdoor Spiders.  Tarantulas can live for many years, so Viper may be with your brother for a long time.

Hi Daniel,
Thanks for the information I love your site :)
I’ll try to get my brother to get a close up of the eye pattern but I’m not sure he’ll be up to it as he is quite intimidated by it…
The image of the unidentified tarantula looks like a Linothele Megatheloides:
http://www.dipluridae.de/wiki/index.php/Linothele_megatheloides
Cheers!

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Subject: Large spider from Ecuador
Location: Vilcabamba, Ecuador
February 1, 2015 3:28 pm
Hey I recently found this spider hiding in my towel! Have tried looking at different possibilities but none seem to fit the bill. It was found in September, in Vilcabamba , Ecuador. Someone suggested it was called Jamaco by the natives here, a type of bird-prey spider, but im not convinced. Any help would be greatly appreciated to satisfy my curiosity of who this visitor was!
Signature: Etienne

Tarantula

Tarantula

Dear Etienne,
This is some species of Tarantula, but we are not certain of the species.  The Spinnerets on the tip of the abdomen are especially pronounced in your individual.  According to Tarántulas de México:  “Spinnerets are movable structures located in the rear of the opisthosoma, and are in charge of expelling and placing the silk web produced by four internal glands. As the silk passes through the ducts and reaches the spinnerets, its molecular structure changes and becomes very resistant. It comes out through small tubes located by the hundreds in the lower part of the spinnerets; then the silk dries, and reaches the consistency we all know.  Tarantulas have four spinnerets: The two lower ones are small, and the higher ones are larger and very mobile.”  We did locate a similar looking Ecuadorean Tarantula on Susan Swensen Witherup’s Ithaca College profile.  Maria Sibylla Merian’s 17th Century illustration of a Bird Eating Tarantula was a hotly debated issue in her time and that illustration caused her to fall out of favor among naturalists because of questions of its authenticity.  According to Tarantulas of Ecuador:  “
Theraphosa Blondi
The largest species of tarantula is also called the goliath bird-eating spider, and its leg span can reach up to 12 inches. They are burrowers and spend the majority of their lives inside their homes, never moving more than a few feet away even while hunting. They prefer swampy areas near water, where their brown bodies will blend into the surroundings. Considered extremely aggressive, these spiders do not make good pets, and are prone to biting — their 1-inch fangs can do a great deal of damage, although the venom is not fatal to humans. The typical diet of this spider includes amphibians, rodents, insects, snakes and the occasional small bird.”  It is pictured on Wonderful Insects by Frank Fieldler, and it does not resemble your Tarantula.  Perhaps one of our readers can provide information on the identity of your Tarantula.

Update from Buglady
The image of the unidentified tarantula looks like a Linothele Megatheloides:
http://www.dipluridae.de/wiki/index.php/Linothele_megatheloides
Cheers!

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Subject: Spider
Location: Santa Clarita, CA
December 18, 2014 8:51 am
found this spider climbing up my patio. Wondering what it is
Signature: Thank you

Male California Trapdoor Spider

Male California Trapdoor Spider

This gorgeous creature is a male California Trapdoor Spider, and we frequently receive sightings and submissions after the first heavy rains of the season when the males leave their burrows and seek mates.

Kathleen Travis Perin, Southern California Wildlife, Hema Shah liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination