Currently viewing the category: "Tarantulas and Trapdoor Spiders"
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Subject: Spider in Cape Town
Location: Cape Town, South Africa
November 9, 2014 1:55 pm
We found this next to our home in Cape Town near table mountain – can you identify it?
Signature: Regards

Probably Trapdoor Spider

Probably Trapdoor Spider

We believe this is a Trapdoor Spider, a primitive group classified along with Tarantulas in the infraorder Mygalomorphae.  We believe it might be a Common Baboon Spider, Harpactira atra, which we found on iSpot.

Common Baboon Spider, we believe

Common Baboon Spider, we believe

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Subject: Spider Scorpion!?
Location: Yakima, WA
November 5, 2014 4:54 pm
I found this spider that appears to have a scorpion tail! What is this bug!?
Signature: Michael D.

Trapdoor Spider

Trapdoor Spider

Dear Michael,
This is a Trapdoor Spider, most likely a Folding-Door Spider in the family Antrodiaetidae based on images posted to BugGuide.

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Ed. Note:  These two submissions came to our personal email accounts from friends.  Of  California Trapdoor Spiders, Charles Hogue wrote in his landmark book Insects of the Los Angeles Basin in 1974:  “”Their rarity now is another example of human expansion destroying the habitat of a local animal.”  Luckily in Glassell Park and Mount Washington, we have a specific plan to help preserve open space and to limit development scale in the hillsides.  We are also blessed with many open space parks that serve as habitat preservation.

Trapdoor Spiders
Location:  Glassell Park, Los Angeles, California
November 1, 2014
Hi Daniel,
My tenant just found this beauty wondering around in the studio.  He looks enormous!  I’m guessing a good 2” long.
Any ideas of what he might be?
Helene

Male California Trapdoor Spider

Male California Trapdoor Spider

Hi Helene,
Tell your tenant that this is a male California Trapdoor Spider, and the first rains of the season generally trigger mating activity in the males which leave their burrows in search of a mate.  Clare send us an image of a male California Trapdoor Spider that she found on her front stoop yesterday.

Trapdoor Spider
November 1, 2013
Location:  Mount Washington, Los Angeles, California
he was huddled on the doorstep this morning.
so, i brought him in.
he’s cold. perhaps washed out of his burrow?
i think i should keep him for a few days until it dries up?
the, he could make a burrow more successfully.
would he eat small crickets?
he was frightened and on a slippery surface.
i moved him into an aerated jam jar which has soil in it.
so he’s happier.
i’ll let him go in a few days.
c.

Male California Trapdoor Spider

Male California Trapdoor Spider

Input from Julian Donahue
‘d release him (most likely male) now. Yes, rain probably brought him out, although this is the time of year males wander about looking for receptive females. That way you don’t have to worry about feeding him either–I suspect they don’t eat much, if at all, this time of year.
jpd

i transferred him to a pot with soil and lid.
will let hm go tomorrow.
i wonder if evening or daylight best?
the termites are swarming over here…
c.

I’d release him tonight–they seem to be primarily nocturnal, since that’s when they usually end up in the pool.
jpd

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

October 18, 2018
Aloha Daniel –
Thought you’d enjoy this story, if you’ve not seen it before.
http://news.yahoo.com/goliath-encounter-puppy-sized-spider-surprises-scientist-rainforest-125720953.html

Ed. Note:  Piotr Naskrecki frequently helps us identify exotic Katydids.

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination
Trapdoor Spider, we believe

Trapdoor Spider, we believe

Subject: Unidentified Kentucky Spider
Location: Louisville, Kentucky.
October 12, 2014 6:25 pm
A friend and I found a spider that we can’t identify, we’ve lived in Louisville all our lives and are outdoorsman and we’ve never seen any spider like it before. It looks a lot bulkier than anything we’ve had around here, almost like a small tarantula but we can’t find anything similar to it anywhere online. We were thinking maybe someone let a bunch of infant tarantula’s loose from a pregnant pet after they hatched and we found one.
Signature: Regards, Stephen.

Hi Stephen,
We wish your image had more detail, because though we believe we have correctly identified your spider as a Trapdoor Spider in the genus
Antrodiaetus, we are not entirely certain.  Your individual looks very much like this individual posted to BugGuide that was found in Pennsylvania.  Along with Tarantulas, Trapdoor Spiders are classified in the Infraorder Mygalomorphae, the most primitive group of spiders.  Another, less likely possibility is a female Southern House Spider, also pictured on BugGuide,  which BugGuide describes as:  “Females are frequently mistaken for small tarantulas or trapdoor spiders. Males are often mistaken for recluse spiders (Loxosceles). This is a totally harmless species that builds “messy” webs emanating from crevices, often on the outside of homes.”

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Tarantula

Tarantula

Subject: Big spider in Arizona
Location: Central Arizona
October 11, 2014 5:38 pm
Dear What’s That Bug?,
While backpacking in the Mazatzal Wilderness near Payson, Arizona I saw this amazing spider! I thought it was my first tarantula, but after looking up pictures of tarantulas, I’m not sure. It was in early October in the morning and it was walking across the path. I managed to take two pictures, but it was moving pretty fast for a spider, so they aren’t great.
Signature: Jason

Tarantula

Tarantula

Hi Jason,
This is definitely a Tarantula, and our best guess is that it is a Desert Blond Tarantula based on images posted to bugGuide.

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