Currently viewing the category: "Tarantulas and Trapdoor Spiders"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Tarantula maybe
Location: San Antonio, TX
September 19, 2014 6:16 am
Can you help me identify this spider I found floating in my pool. When I got it out I was surprised it was alive. It is about 2 inches long and the body is 1/2 inch wide. I did not see it spread out its legs. Is it dangerous?
Signature: Lisa

Trapdoor Spider

Trapdoor Spider

Dear Lisa,
This is a Trapdoor Spider, and though it is theoretically not a Tarantula, it is classified with the Tarantulas in the infraorder Mygalomorphae, and according to BugGuide, the Mygalomorphs are:  “Easily distinguished from araneomorphs by two pairs of booklungs; fangs and chelicerae are parallel to the body axis.”
  BugGuide also notes:  “This is a more primitive group of spiders which includes the infamous tarantulas, primarily represented by members of Family Theraphosidae. Other familiar members include the trapdoor spiders and purseweb spiders.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Unusual Black Spider
Location: Vancouver Island, British Columbia
September 13, 2014 11:43 am
Hello Bugman! I was walking down the street and I saw this guy puttering along the sidewalk out of the corner of my eye. At first I thought it was a large black beetle but upon closer inspection it turned out to be a rather large and unusual spider. I’ve lived on Vancouver Island my whole life and have come across a lot of our native spiders which have all looked pretty similar, but this one looks nothing like anything I’ve ever seen in the wild! He/she was quite meaty looking and fairly large. Any ideas about what spider this is and where he/she could have come from?
Signature: Britt

Folding Door Spider

Folding Door Spider

Dear Britt,
We are confident that your Trapdoor Spider is a native male Folding Door Spider in the genus
Antrodiaetus thanks to this comparable image posted to Bugguide.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Big Spider Bear Lake Idaho
Location: Fish Haven, Idaho
September 13, 2014 9:47 pm
Saw this big spider on our walk today near Bear Lake on the Idaho side. It was sitting (standing?) in the road. It is mid-September, leaves are changing, and has been a wet fall. Is it venomous? Dangerous? Tried to talk my friend into putting her hand down beside it for a size reference but she refused…something about being afraid of spiders. It was bigger than a silver dollar but smaller than the toy poodle walking with us.
Signature: Thanks

Trapdoor Spider

Trapdoor Spider

We believe this is a Trapdoor Spider, but we have not had any luck identifying it on BugGuide.  We hope one of our readers will provide us with something more specific.  Large Trapdoor Spiders might bite if carelessly handled, but they are not considered dangerous to humans.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: unknown arachnid
Location: Parker Texas
August 4, 2014 9:40 pm
I see a lot of bugs, thanks to my occupation I’m relieved to find this website.
Try this one guys.
Found in Parker Texas, in a garage. Mid summer, plenty of tall trees around the area.
Signature: -thank you kindly -Deej

Wafer-Lid Trapdoor Spider

Wafer-Lid Trapdoor Spider

Hi Deej,
This is some species of Trapdoor Spider, and we believe it is a male.  It looks to us like it might be a Wafer-Lid Trapdoor Spider in the genus
Myrmekiaphila based on images posted to BugGuide

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: California Tarantula?
Location: Thousand Oaks CA
July 6, 2014 9:41 pm
Thank you for such an interesting and informative site!
I went for a walk with my husband and kids tonight- a hot July evening in Thousand Oaks CA, and my husband spotted this crawling up a curb.
I tried looking through your site for anything similar, but it didn’t seem to match anything I could find. It was almost as big as my hand, and the main part of the body appeared to be hairless, but the “butt” was hairy, and narrower than the main part of the body.
Signature: Kay

Tarantula

Tarantula

Hi Kay,
Tarantula sightings in much of Southern California are becoming rarer and rarer due to habitat loss, and now they are only seen in areas that abut natural open space.  Most North American Tarantulas are in the genus
Aphonopelma which is represented on BugGuide.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Red Legged Purse Web spider (male)
Location: Eno River State Park, NC
June 18, 2014 8:13 am
I was hiking with my son at the Eno River State Park in North Carolina. We discovered this spider crawling on the ground. It actually paused for the photo. It was bigger than a quarter.
I think I identified it as a male red legged purse web spider. It has rather large fangs.
Does it bite? Will it’s fangs pierce human skin?
I understand that they make silk funnels on a tree or rock face and then hide behind the silk wall waiting for prey. As the prey enters the funnel, the spider lunges and bites through the silk wall.
It’s quite a cool spider.
Signature: James Chamberlain

Red Legged Purseweb Spider

Red Legged Purseweb Spider

Dear James,
Thanks so much for sending in your image of a male Red Legged Purseweb Spider,
Sphodros rufipes.  The information you have is consistent with what we have read.  We have not read anything regarding the bite of a Red Legged Purseweb Spider, however, the fangs do look formidable and we are guessing they might be able to bite a human, though in general, Spiders in the Infraorder Mygalomorphae, which include Tarantulas and Trapdoor Spiders, are not aggressive toward humans.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination