Currently viewing the category: "Orb Weavers"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Name That Nope!
Location: Chesapeake, Virginia
May 20, 2016 2:26 pm
I found this neat little guy running around my smoker 2 days ago (May 18, 2016). I live in Chesapeake, VA. I’ve reached out to the internet via Facebook and Imgur as well as searched through a spider database i found with no matches. Suggestions were a Juvenile Orb Weaver (which we’ve had a few of over the years) or theridion grallator.
Signature: -Anthony T.

"Blind Eyed" Orbweaver

“Blind Eyed” Orbweaver

Dear Anthony,
Orbweaver is a general name for a Spider from the family Araneidae and according to BugGuide:  “There are approximately 3,500 species worldwide, with 180 occurring north of Mexico.”  But for the eerie pair of blind eyespots on your individual, we thought it resembled, especially in the true eye arrangement,
Araneus alboventris pictured on BugGuide and described on BugGuide as “Carapace, sternum, legs greenish yellow. Bright yellow rings around posterior median eyes. Abdomen dorsum with black patch bordered by crimson red border on golden yellow background.”  Then on BugGuide we found a male, recognizable because of the enlarged pedipalps, the first pair of appendages that are used to transfer sperm to the female.  A comment compares this individual to Araneus alboventris.  We suspect this is a white spotted color variation of Araneus alboventris and we propose the common name Blind Eyed Orbweaver.  We love the many views you provided, including the lateral view that reveals the spinnerets.

"Blind Eyed" Orbweaver

“Blind Eyed” Orbweaver

"Blind Eyed" Orbweaver

“Blind Eyed” Orbweaver

"Blind Eyed" Orbweaver revealing spinnerets

“Blind Eyed” Orbweaver revealing spinnerets

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Chiminea Spider
Location: Ajijic, Jalisco, Mexico
May 13, 2016 9:12 pm
Saw this today with a web that covers the entire opening to the chiminea.
Was hoping you could tell me what’s that bug.
Signature: Dale

Writing Spider

Writing Spider

Dear Dale,
This is an Orbweaver in the genus
Argiope, possibly a Silver Argiope, Argiope argentata, which you can find on BugGuide.  Spiders in the genus Argiope are harmless, and they are frequently called Writing Spiders because of the elaborate patterns woven into the web.  We located images of Orbweavers will similar stabilimenta on Nature Photo and National Geographic that are identified as Argiope savignyi, a species found in Central and South America.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Cocoon identification
Location: Melbourne
May 10, 2016 10:17 pm
I found this on my Magnolia tree today. I am in Melbourne, Australia. I am interested to know what it is. I have removed it from the tree. It is currently Autumn.
Signature: Regards Sharon

Bird Dropping Spider Egg Sacs

Bird Dropping Spider Egg Sacs

Dear Sharon,
These look like the Egg Sacs of a Spider.  We found a matching image on Museum Victoria where it states:  “Another interesting feature of this spider is its egg sacs. Bird-dropping Spiders can produce up to 13 egg cases. They are dark brown with black markings and, when suspended in the web, look like a bunch of dark grapes. The female keeps watch over the egg cases until the young emerge, usually in late winter to early spring.”  The scientific name of the Bird Dropping Spider is
Celaemia excavata.  The adult Bird Dropping Spider is pictured on the Australian Museum site.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Someone recognize?
Location: Rio, Brazil
April 26, 2016 11:05 pm
Someone recognize this spider ?
Signature: Assaf

Silver Argiope

Silver Argiope

Dear Assaf,
This gorgeous spider looks to us like a North American species, the Silver Argiope, and there is a matching image of the ventral view on BugGuide.
  According to Corbis Images, the Silver Argiope, Argiope argentata, is also found in Brazil.  According to our sister site from Brazil, Insetologia, the Silver Argiope is known as Aranha de Prata.

This great, Daniel.
Thank you very much!
Assaf

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Golden SIlk Orb Weaver
Location: East Java, Indonesia
March 29, 2016 12:04 am
Hi, I’m an amateur photographer and I found this Golden Silk Orb Weaver on a mango tree, all I know is that it is of Nephila Genus but I can’t find out about the species. Here’s the story :
The female spider is roughly about 3,5 – 4 inches long (including leg span), I also spot a smaller yet looked very different most likely to be the male roughly about 1 – 1,5 inches long including leg span. It has about 0,75 m x 1 m wide shiny golden web on one side of the mango tree. I also managed to get a sample of her silk which looks very pretty and shiny.
I’m very curious about the species.
Thank you.
Signature: A17N Photography

Golden Silk Spider

Golden Silk Spider

Dear A17N Photography,
You image showing the underside of this Golden Silk Spider does not reveal the markings, but one species found in Java, according to Getty Images, is
Nephila pilipes.   It appears that there are two smaller spiders directly above the female at the top edge of your image, just above the tangle of golden silk that gives this distinctive genus its common name.    

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Sumatra Spider
Location: Sumatra, indonesia
March 22, 2016 6:53 am
Hi,
Saw this spider in Sumatra, any chance anybody can identify it.
Thanks
Steve
Signature: Steve

Golden Silk Spider

Golden Silk Spider

Dear Steve,
This Golden Silk Spider is absolutely gorgeous.  She is a member of the diverse genus
Nephila that is characterized by having very strong, golden silk that can be woven into a resilient garment.  We will attempt to identify her species at a later time.
Update:  Your spider might be Nephila pilipes.  According to iGoTerra, the species is also called a Giant Wood Spider.

Golden Silk Spider with Steve for scale.

Golden Silk Spider with Steve for scale.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination