Currently viewing the category: "Orb Weavers"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Yellowish Orange Spider with stripes on legs
Location: Garden in Portland, OR in September
September 20, 2016 10:16 am
I have a picture of a spider which I would like to identify in case it bites or is otherwise dangerous.
Signature: Thanks Ilze Choi

Orbweaver

Orbweaver

Dear Ilze,
This is a harmless Orbweaver in the family Araneidae.  Large Orbweavers might bite, but they are not aggressive, and the bite will cause nothing more than local swelling and tenderness.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Arrow spider and goldenrod
Location: Troy, VA
September 18, 2016 12:22 pm
Hi Daniel,
I’m trying hard not to inudate you with photos, but I thought you might like this image of an arrow spider by some goldenrod. While the spider is not using the goldenrod as direct source of food, it is nicely camouflaged by the goldenrod and seems to be using it as a way to hunt insects that do feed on the goldenrod. The yellow of the spider and the yellow of the goldenrod are remarkably similar. Also, it’s such a cool little spider.
Signature: Grace Pedalino

Arrowhead Micrathena

Arrowshaped Micrathena

Dear Grace,
One couldn’t help but to disagree more with your belief that this Arrowshaped Micrathena “is not using the goldenrod as a direct source of food” because though it is not eating the goldenrod, it is eating the insects that are attracted to the goldenrod.  While Arrowhead Micrathenas would survive without the goldenrod, we believe that they and other orbweavers as well as carnivorous insects including preying mantids thrive in a goldenrod meadow.  This is a marvelous addition to our Goldenrod Meadow tag and we agree heartily that the coloration of the Arrowshaped Micrathena is perfect with the goldenrod.  Here is a nice BugGuide image of an Arrowhead Micrathena.  We forgot that we had a 10 Most Beautiful Spiders tag, and we are adding your Arrowhead Micrathena to that tag.

Arrowhead Micrathena

Arrowshaped Micrathena

Arrowhead Micrathena

Arrowshaped Micrathena

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Looks like an egg sac
Location: South East NC
September 11, 2016 8:14 am
Hi, found this inside the rain deverter on my husbands truck this morning.
Do you know what it is?
Thank you!
Signature: Suzanne

Crablike Spiny Orbweaver Egg Sac

Crablike Spiny Orbweaver Egg Sac

Dear Suzanne,
The first thought that passed through our mind when we looked at your image is that this might be the egg sac of a spider, and we followed that supposition, which quickly led us to the Featured Creatures site and a nearly identical image of the Egg Sac of a Crablike Spiny Orbweaver or Spinybacked Orbweaver Spider,
Gasteracantha cancriformis.  The egg sacs are described on Featured Creatures as being:  “Ovate egg sacs, 20 to 25 mm long by 10 to 15 mm wide, are deposited on the undersides of leaves adjacent to the female’s web from October through January. The egg mass consists of 101 to 256 eggs, with a mean of 169 (based on 15 egg masses). After the eggs are laid on a white silken sheet, they are first covered with a loose, tangled mass of fine white or yellowish silk, then several strands of dark green silk are laid along the longitudinal axis of the egg mass, followed by a net-like canopy of coarse green and yellow threads. Eggs are frequently attacked by specialized predators, primarily Phalacrotophora epeirae (Brues) (Diptera: Phoridae), and occasionally Arachnophago ferruginea Gahan (Hymenoptera: Eupelmidae) (Muma and Stone 1971). Eggs take 11 to 13 days to hatch, then spend two to three days in a pink and white deutova stage before molting to the first instar.”  A similar image can be found on Nature Closeups and on BugGuide.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Banded Garden Spider?
Location: Hialeah, Florida
September 8, 2016 7:43 am
I *think* this is a female Banded Garden Spider. I first saw it on August 14 and at first thought it was a tree snail due to the appearance of the back. The body was more than an inch long, and it stayed in its web in the same place for weeks, catching bees. I was rather hoping there would be a lot of baby spiders later, but a few weeks later there were 2 days of torrential rain during which time I didn’t look for her & when I did look, she was gone, leaving an intact web and no clue as to her disappearance. The third photo was one of a lucky series- I was taking a picture of her holding a webbed up bee when another bee landed in the web. She was on that second bee so fast I had to scramble to get pics! (I’ll send 3 more of the series in another query.)Spider webbing up caught bee. I chose these out of the series because one shows the bee clearly, and the other two do a fair job of showing the spinnerets in action.
Signature: Curious in Florida

Banded Garden Spider

Banded Garden Spider

Dear Curious in Florida,
Thanks for sending in your wonderful images of a Banded Garden Spider or Banded Orbweaver,
Argiope trifasciata.  They are an excellent addition to our archives.

Banded Garden Spider

Banded Garden Spider

Banded Garden Spider Snares Honey Bee

Banded Garden Spider Snares Honey Bee

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Spider
Location: Tennessee
September 1, 2016 4:01 pm
Hello, I have found this pretty big spider outside of my window. Still got yellowish greenish dots on its bottom and long legs. I’m wondering if it’s poisonous or harmful at all. Thanks.
Signature: L.T

Golden Orbweaver

Golden Orbweaver

Dear L.T.,
This is a Golden Orbweaver,
Argiope aurantia, a common North American species.  Most spiders have venom that they use to subdue prey, but few spiders have venom that poses a threat to humans.  Large spiders might bite if carelessly handled, but the bite of most spiders is not considered dangerous to humans, producing nothing more than local swelling and tenderness.  Golden Orbweavers as well as all other Orbweavers in the family Araneidae are considered harmless to humans, but again, we would caution that a large individual might bite.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Unknown spider
Location: South central idaho
September 1, 2016 10:44 am
I found this spider and several people have been wondering what species it is. The size reference is the large canning lid underneath.
Signature: Electronic

Banded Orbweaver

Banded Orbweaver

Dear Electronic,
We just finished posting another image of a Banded Orbweaver, a harmless spider species from an entire family that is considered harmless.  Your image is much more detailed than the one we just posted.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination