Currently viewing the category: "Nursery Web Spiders"
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Subject: White Banded Fishing Spider and a Pink Green Lynx
Location: Carthage NC
March 11, 2014 10:04 am
while looking around for ways to identified this tow , I found your side ! I take photos of insect for my own intellectual enrichment . base on other search I have done I believe I identified this tow (White Banded Fishing Spider and a Pink Green Lynx) correctly but Is always great to ask to the experts :) I really appreciate your help ! Kary Clark
PS: Loving the side and all the information and interaction with others.
Signature: Kary Clark

Whitebanded Fishing Spider

White Banded Fishing Spider

Dear Kary,
You have sent us photos of two of our five favorite North American Spiders.  We think the White Banded Fishing Spiders are the most beautiful North American Spiders, and the maternal care given to the young earns them the family name Nursery Web Spiders.  The Green Lynx is one of the most amazing hunters.  They lie in wait, camouflaged on rose bushes and other green shrubbery, and then they leap upon their prey.  Green Lynx Spiders also fiercely guard their young.

Green Lynx Spider

Green Lynx Spider

Thank you for the info! it made me smile that you guys even saw this photos that quickly!

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Fishing Spider OR Nursery Web Spider?
Location: Newport, New Hampshire
September 23, 2013 9:43 pm
While out ”river walking” in the Sugar River, in Newport, New Hampshire, i saw this beauty.
I am NOT a big fan of spiders…in fact they terrify me. This one caught my eyes with its markings.
It seemed to be able to walk on water, and had very little fear as i walked around it. When i bent down to take a photo, i must have startled it, because it ran very fast over the rocks, and left behind a few little droplets of a milky liquid.
*On Google Maps, it was seen in Newport, Sullivan County, New Hampshire. Along the East side of the Sugar River, 400 feet West of 109 South Main Street.
Signature: Tiffanie

Fishing Spider:  Dolomedes vittatus

Fishing Spider: Dolomedes vittatus

Ed. Note:  We will write more in the morning.

Hi Tiffanie,
As a point of clarification, all Fishing Spiders are Nursery Web Spiders, but not all Nursery Web Spiders are Fishing Spiders.  The Fishing Spiders are in the genus
Dolomedes, and the genus is contained in the Nursery Web Spider family Pisauridae.  Nursery Web Spiders are among the most protective spider mothers with the female carrying around the egg sac in her chelicerae or fangs until she finds a suitable place to construct her nursery web.  She remains to guard the youngsters until she dies or they disperse.  Nursery Web Spiders including Fishing Spiders generally only survive a single season.  We believe your Fishing Spider is Dolomedes vittatus based on photos posted to BugGuide.  Fishing Spiders in the genus Dolomedes are often found near water and and you observed, they are capable of walking on water.  They can also dive beneath the surface and remain there for an extended period of time to escape predators and some even develop the skills to catch small fish and other aquatic life

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Wolf Spider???
Location: Snow Hill, MD 21863
September 22, 2013 2:05 pm
Hi! I believe this is a wolf spider of some kind. I live on the Eastern Shore of MD, near Ocean City. He was absolutely GORGEOUS and I’ve never seen one like him around here! He was huge!!!! About the size of my palm (including his legs). He was very skittish, so I tried not to disturb him when I took the picture. I would love to know for sure if it is a wolf spider. I’m pretty sure that’s the largest kind we have here. I just wish he’d have let me get a better picture.
Signature: Crissi :)

Fishing Spider

Fishing Spider

Dear Crissi,
This magnificent spider is a Fishing Spider in the genus
Dolomedes.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Giant Striped Spider Feasting on Beetle!
Location: Goose Creek, SC
August 1, 2013 10:09 pm
Hello Bug-People! Tonight (Aug 1) I found a giant spider eating dinner on my laundry room door jamb. This thing is HUGE! Easily 3” in diameter. Looking through your archives I suspect it is a Fishing Spider. Am I right? Thanks for your help as always and I hope you enjoy the pictures; it is quite a handsome specimen.
Signature: Kerry Bateman

White Banded Fishing Spider with Prey

White Banded Fishing Spider with Prey

Dear Kerry,
We surely hope you did not take our tardy response time as an indication of any lack of enthusiasm on our part.  We had been away from the office beginning July 30 and we did not respond to any identification requests for 2 1/2 weeks.  “Handsome” is an understatement.  This is a gorgeous Fishing Spider, most likely a White Banded Fishing Spider,
Dolomedes albineus, based on this image posted to BugGuide.

Eye Arrangement of White Banded Fishing Spider

Eye Arrangement of White Banded Fishing Spider

One of the best ways to identify spiders to the family level is by the eye arrangement.  If we zoom in, they eyes on this beauty clearly match the Dolomedes eye arrangement pictured on BugGuide.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Mama fishing spider
Location: Littleton, NH
July 23, 2013 6:32 pm
Hi!
We have a VERY protective mama Fishing Spider who attached her egg sac to our screen door this last Saturday. Many of the babies have hatched and she has spun a beautiful web in the corner of the screen to protect then. While we love seeing nature at work, we do have two small children who want so badly to get close to them and Mama does not appreciate it! How long can we expect them to stick around before heading off on their own?
Signature: The Woodsons

Fishing Spider Spins Nursery Web

Fishing Spider Spins Nursery Web

Dear Woodsons,
We don’t know exactly how long a Fishing Spider will guard her nursery web, but we speculate that the spiderlings will begin to disperse after about a week.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Fishing or Wolf Spider with Egg Sac
Location: Sullivan County, NY
July 3, 2013 5:19 pm
I almost grabbed this girl while I was sorting laundry. Thankfully her big white egg sac stood out against the black running shorts and I stopped short. I scooped her up in a mason jar and took her outside.
Friends have alternately identified her as a fishing spider and a wolf spider. Which is she?
Also, I noticed two of these spiders on the side of my cabin (outside, thankfully!) about two weeks prior to this. Then they were no longer on the house, but I found one in my tub and now her. Do you think they are the same two?
Thanks for any help you can provide!
Signature: Kambri Crews

Fishing Spider with Egg Sac

Fishing Spider with Egg Sac

Dear Kambri,
Both Fishing Spiders and Wolf Spider exhibit excellent maternal care beginning with the Egg Sac which is transported around with the mother.  Both families also care for the young for a short while.  Wolf Spiders transport the Egg Sac by dragging it behind them.  The Egg Sac is attached to the spinnerets.  Female Fishing Spiders carry the Egg Sac in the chelicerae or mouthparts.  Your spider is a Fishing Spider.  We do not know how dense the population of Fishing Spider is in your area so we cannot guess if you saw the same two spiders or different individuals.  While the filters utilized to create artistic instagrams often distort details that would be helpful for identification purposes, we must admit that this effective instagram shows the characteristic stance of a female Fishing Spider carrying about her egg sac.

Instagram of Fishing Spider

Instagram of Fishing Spider

Thanks so much! Love the site!
Kambri

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination