Currently viewing the category: "Nursery Web Spiders"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Large spider by swimming pool
Location: Rollingwood, Texas
August 3, 2015 6:01 am
This approx. 3 inch spider has been lying in wait for prey (we think) right inside the opening to one of our pool’s skimmer baskets. There is some rather loose webbing spun inside where we can reach in to remove the basket proper.
I can’t find a spider with similar markings – everything I find has lighter color bands between darker bands rather than dark bands in the center. The legs are slightly banded as well.
I’d like to get proper ID so I can assure folks using the pool the spider isn’t after them and is harmless to swim around? Thank you very much.
Signature: AnxiousPoolMom

Fishing Spider

Six Spotted Fishing Spider

Dear AnxiousPoolMom,
This is definitely a Nursery Web Spider in the family Pisauridae, and we are relatively certain it is a Six Spotted Fishing Spider,
Dolomedes triton, which is a variable species that can be viewed on BugGuide.  Fishing Spiders in the genus Dolomedes are frequently found in the immediate vicinity of a body of water, hence the attractiveness of your pool.  Though they get quite large, Fishing Spiders are not aggressive towards humans and they are not considered dangerous.  There is always the possibility that a bite might occur if carelessly handling a larger spider, but we feel the chances of being bitten are quite slim.

Six Spotted Fishing Spider

Six Spotted Fishing Spider

Daniel:  Thank you!  We have two adult children (one of whom brings his dog over to swim) and though neither is particularly skittish around spiders, due to the size of this one I wanted to be able to assure them there’s no reason to try and harm the spider or even chase it off.  We don’t spray (with rare exceptions) and try to take a no-kill approach whenever possible.  I always feel proper ID is one of the best adjuncts to that approach, but simply couldn’t make the identification in this case.
I sincerely appreciate your help. /Deb Wilson

Ann Levitsky liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: what is this spider?
Location: Stafford Virginia
July 18, 2015 3:05 pm
Can you tell me what this spider is?
Signature: Katyana

Fishing Spider

Fishing Spider

Dear Katyana,
This is a harmless Fishing Spider in the genus
Dolomedes.

Amelia Gajary, Ann Levitsky, Jessica M. Schemm, Mary Sheridan Page Fatzinger liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Spider
Location: Rhode Island , USA
July 11, 2015 2:03 pm
Is this a grass spider?
Signature: Kirsten

Nursery Web Spider with Egg Sac

Nursery Web Spider with Egg Sac

Dear Kirsten,
This is not a Grass Spider.  This pretty little lady is a Nursery Web Spider,
Pisaurina mira, and she is carrying her egg sac.  Nursery Web Spiders are harmless, and not aggressive except when defending their young.  The female Nursery Web Spider has very strong maternal instincts, and she carries her egg sac with her until she finds an appropriate place to leave it.  She then spins a nursery web and continues to guard the eggs and the young until they are ready to disperse.  Nursery Web Spiders are hunting spiders that do not build a web to snare prey.  The sole purpose of the web is for a nursery.

Nursery Web Spider with Egg Sac

Nursery Web Spider with Egg Sac

Hi Daniel!
Thank you so much for this information … Glad to know she is not aggressive despite her intimidating size. I did not kill her, but did gently relocate her with a garden rake( I really needed the length as I fear spiders) ,and she held on to her egg sac , into some woods behind my house. Hope she can find a nice place away from my chair lounger!
Thanks!
Kirsten

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Fishing Spider?
Location: Shepherdstown, West Virginia
April 16, 2015 9:36 am
I found this gorgeous spider in an out building about a week ago (April 2015). At first I assumed it was some type of Wolf Spider, but further research has me now believing that it might be a Fishing Spider instead. It was rather large in size and was patient enough to allow me to get a few quick photos before it raced off to find cover. I’m also assuming it’s a female. I’m a huge bug fan and love your website! Thanks for what you do!
Signature: A Bug Geek

Fishing Spider

Fishing Spider

Dear Bug Geek,
We love your images of a Fishing Spider in the genus
Dolomedes.  Many years ago, Daniel had a photography exhibit at the college in Shepherdstown.

Fishing Spider

Fishing Spider

Fishing Spider

Fishing Spider

Mike Cline, Sue Dougherty, Amy Gosch, Hanalie Sonneblom, Katie Pasulka Casas, Jessica M. Schemm, Kristi E. Lambert, Andrea Leonard Drummond liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Spider
Location: Pennsylvania
November 10, 2014 2:03 pm
Hi, I found this spider outside while I was stacking wood. It’s pretty big, about the size of a silver dollar or bigger. I was wondering what it was and if it was venomous.
Thanks!
Signature: -Marissa

Fishing Spider

Fishing Spider

Dear Marissa,
You encountered a Fishing Spider in the genus
Dolomedes.  They have venom, but they are not considered dangerous to humans.  Fishing Spiders are generally found not far from water.

Janelle Evans liked this post
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Subject: what is this?
Location: leighton, al 35646
September 10, 2014 3:13 pm
Can u identify this bug?
Signature: bug man

Six Spotted Fishing Spider

Six Spotted Fishing Spider

Dear bug man,
Your image is gorgeous.  This is a Six Spotted Fishing Spider,
Dolomedes triton.  Though the entire genus is commonly referred to as Fishing Spiders, the Six Spotted Fishing Spider is one of the species most closely associated with water.  As you image documents, the spiders are able to disperse their weight across all eight legs and then walk on water.  Fishing Spiders can also dive beneath the surface of the water to hide from predators and they occasionally catch small fish, tadpoles and other aquatic creatures.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination