Currently viewing the category: "Nursery Web Spiders"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What type of spider is this
Location: Upstate, NY
June 20, 2016 5:48 am
This was found near friends house in Binghamton, NY. Could you please tell me what type of spider it us and if it is poisonous? Could you tell me a little about the spider?
Signature: Marcus

Fishing Spider

Fishing Spider

Dear Marcus,
This is a Fishing Spider in the genus
Dolomedes, and they are generally found not far from water.  They are also called Dock Spiders.  Fishing Spiders are not aggressive and they are not considered dangerous to humans.  Female Fishing Spiders exhibit strong maternal behavior.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What Spider is this?
Location: Simsbury, CT
June 7, 2016 6:57 pm
Found this guy/gal outside of my house? Was concerned it might be a brown recluse but can’t find the signature violin markings. Other people are suggesting a wolf spider, but again I don’t think so.
Signature: Brooks Parker

Nursery Web Spider

Nursery Web Spider

Dear Brooks,
This is a female Nursery Web Spider,
Pisaurina miraNursery Web Spiders exhibit a strong maternal behavior, carrying the egg sac and eventually spinning a nursery web and guarding the spiderlings once they hatch.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Nc spider
Location: Chapel hill nc
June 6, 2016 8:48 pm
Hello! My daughter was about to climb this tree and then spotted this beautifully camouflaged spider. We would love to know what it is. It was mid afternoon on a sunny day here in central North Carolina.
Thanks!
Signature: Adrienne

Fishing Spider

Fishing Spider

Dear Adrienne,
This well camouflaged spider is a Fishing Spider in the genus
Dolomedes, and they are generally found not far from a body of water.  It appears the Fishing Spider may have captured prey, because the orange object in its mouth or chelicerae is not part of the spider.  Female Fishing Spiders carry the egg sac in their chelicerae, but that does not appear to be an egg sac.

What's In the Fishing Spider's Mouth???

What’s In the Fishing Spider’s Mouth???

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Big spider!
Location: Southeastern Virginia
June 1, 2016 6:25 pm
Found this creature in my kitchen in southeastern Virginia in May 2016. I captured him in a cup and set him free outside, away from the house. It is quite large, What type of spider is this?
Signature: Beaker

Fishing Spider

Fishing Spider

Dear Beaker,
This is a harmless Fishing Spider in the genus
Dolomedes, and they are sometimes called Dock Spiders.  We are guessing you have a body of water near your home.  Because of your kindness, we are tagging your posting with the Bug Humanitarian Award.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: My Company’s New Pet
Location: New Jersey
May 24, 2016 7:23 am
Hi Mr. Bugman!
So, We happened upon this little guy/girl at our office in New Jersey, just sitting there on the floor. I was able to be right next to it without it scurrying about, even let me catch it in a cup to let it out outside. Any ideas what it is? It was fairly big compared to most spiders I’m used to seeing around the house or office. I didn’t think to take a picture of it next to anything to compare its size at the time but I know with its legs it was just small enough to fit inside the cup I used. (Picture of cup attached too lol)
Signature: Stef

Male Fishing Spider

Male Fishing Spider

Dear Stef,
Based on the size of his pedipalps, we believe this Fishing Spider in the genus
Dolomedes is a male, and that he is most likely a Northern Fishing SpiderDolomedes tenebrosus, a species generally found near water.  According to BugGuide:  “A study by Schwartz, Wagner & Hebets, August 2013, has found that during mating the male of this species dies.”

Oh wow that was fast! Thank you so much! I thought that’s what it might have been, googling around on the web, but most of the pictures I found showed the spider to be much bigger than the one we had (like the size of my palm or bigger) this guy was much smaller in that regards. Which I suppose the fact that he’s a male would explain that lol
Either way, thanks for clarifying! Now I can ease my coworker’s fears that this spider is not going to put him in the hospital haha
Stef

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Large spider
Location: East Tennessee. Johnson city
April 30, 2016 2:09 pm
Just curious about what type of spider this is.
Signature: Halston Brooks

Male Nursery Web Spider

Male Nursery Web Spider

Dear Halston,
We believe this is a male Nursery Web Spider,
Pisaurina mira, a species well represented on our site, though we generally receive images of female Nursery Web Spiders.  Males have much larger pedipalps, the leglike appendages that are near the chelicerae or fangs.  According to the Spiders of Kentucky:  “Like the chelicerae, a spider’s pedipalps are part of its mouth, and are located just between the chelicerae and first pair of legs on the cephalothorax. Pedipalps are jointed, and look somewhat like small legs. They are not used like legs, though.  Instead, they are more like antennae: pedipalps help the spider sense objects that it encounters.  Some spiders also use their pedipalps to shape their webs and to aid in prey capture and feeding.  Pedipalps are used by male spiders to transfer sperm to female spiders.  In fact, you can usually distinguish a male spider from a female because of the male’s enlarged pedipalps.  All arachnids have pedipalps, but they often look quite different than spider pedipalps.  In Scorpions, for instance, the large pincers are actually modified pedipalps.”  Nursery Web Spiders do not spin webs to snare prey.  The female builds a nursery web to protect the young and both sexes hunt rather than to wait passively for prey.  Here is a BugGuide posting that illustrates the eye arrangement which we used to identify your individual.  Our big doubt regarding this identification was the size of the spinnerets visible in your individual.  We did locate an image of an adult male on the Spiders In Ohio site that possesses similar spinnerets (scroll to view image), the organs used in spinning silk.

Male Nursery Web Spider

Male Nursery Web Spider

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination