Currently viewing the category: "Longjawed Orbweavers"
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Subject: Yellow striped spider
Location: North Tamborine, Queensland Australia
January 11, 2014 8:44 pm
Hi bug an, can you tell me what spider this is. A simple search of “yellow striped spider” yielded nothing.
Thanks
Ben
Signature: Thanks Ben

Messy Leaf Curling Spider

Messy Leaf Curling Spider

Hi Ben,
We figured this might be an Orbweaver in the family Araneidae, so we browsed through the family on the Brisbane Insect and Spider site and quickly located the Messy Leaf Curling Spider,
Deliochus zelivira, which though the stripes on the individual pictured are white, otherwise resembles your spider.  The description fits as well stating:  “This spider builds large messy retreat by curling a few green and dry leaves bound together by silks. Male and female can be found in the same retreat during breeding season. Males of this species are more often seen because they wandering around looking for females. Matured females are in the messy large retreat and hardly be seen.”  Armed with a scientific name, we then located the Spiders of Australia website that pictures a yellow striped individual, but the family is indicated as Tetragnathidae, the Long-Jawed Orbweavers.  Arachne.org.au utilizes the same image and explains the taxonomy confusion by indicating:  “Deliochus zelivira, probably the most common of the Deliochus spp., found throughout Australia, appears to have been moved to Tetragnathidae then back to Araneidae. The female can grow to 11 mm, the male 5 mm. They construct a retreat of eucalypt leaves. “  Dave’s Garden also has a photo.  All indications are that your individual is a male. 

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Subject: A Web with a View for a longjawed orbweaver
Location: Naperville, IL
July 21, 2013 7:28 pm
Dear Daniel~
A longjawed orbweaver, I presume, but Tetragnatha sp. is as far as I could get. This spider was in this exact same position on this asclepias tuberosa every time I passed it for about 48 hours, after which I could no longer find it.
Have a beautiful day!
Signature: Dori Eldridge

Long-Jawed Orbweaver

Long-Jawed Orbweaver

Hi Dori,
We agree that this appears to be a Long-Jawed Orbweaver.  Your milkweed does have a diverse ecosystem occupying it.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Orchard Spider
Location: Southeast Tennessee, Cumberland Plateau
June 17, 2013 9:58 am
From other photos, I believe that this spider who has recently taken up residence near our back porch is an Orchard Spider. In its orb web, I was able to get photos both from above and below.
Thanks for your great resource!
Signature: Bob

Orchard Spider

Orchard Spider

Hi Bob,
In our opinion, your identification of an Orchard Spider,
Leucauge venusta, is correct.  Thanks for sending your wonderful photos of the spider and its web.

Orchard Spider

Orchard Spider

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: gorgeous and tiny
Location: NJ, woodland area
June 17, 2013 1:23 pm
I was taking Macro pictures of flowers after the rain today in North Central NJ. I noticed movement on one of the tiny flowers. I was an even tinier spider. I was able to get an okay shot, enough I think for someone who knows their stuff to identify it. Later I went back and it was busy making a web between the tow plants. The plants are small, Pyrolas, ”wintergreens” the flowers are not much more than a quarter inch across to give you perspective on size.
Signature: Karen Smith

Orchard Spider

Orchard Spider

Dear Karen,
This is an Orchard Spider,
Leucauge venusta, or a closely related species.  They truly are gemlike spiders.

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Subject: Most Intimidating Spider I’ve Ever Seen
Location: NE PA, Walnut Creek, Millcreek, Asbury Woods
May 12, 2013 5:48 pm
I was filming on the banks of Walnut Creek in NE Pennsylvania in the Lake Erie watershed when I saw this on my walking stick. I assumed it was an arachnid of some kind since it has eight legs (two being shorter than the others). It can also make a web. I have spent a year looking myself for information on what it is but cannot find anything. Now I’m branching out to other sources.
I apologize for the quality of the following pictures. They are screen shots of the raw footage I have of it. If I remember correctly, it was maybe two inches big, including leg span.
Signature: Adam S.

Long Jawed Orbweaver

Long Jawed Orbweaver

Dear Adam,
This formidable looking spider is a Long Jawed Orvweaver in the genus Tetragnatha, but we are uncertain of the species, so we are contacting Mandy Howe for assistance.  According to BugGuide:  “These spiders spin circular (orb) webs, mostly in the horizontal plane, often just inches above the surface of water where they can intercept emerging insects like midges, mayflies, and stoneflies.”
  BugGuide also notes:  “Larger species near water, especially along the shores of rivers and streams. Smaller species in fields and meadows.”

Long Jawed Orbweaver

Long Jawed Orbweaver

Long Jawed Orbweaver

Long Jawed Orbweaver

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Mating Dance of Orchard Spiders
Location: Near the Maury River in Glasgow, Virginia, Rockbridge County.
September 3, 2012 9:06 am
Hello,
I took these shots this past summer in a field near Glasgow, Virginia.
I have ID’ed them as stated above.
I saw the female (greenish color) cast off her old exoskeleton earlier that morning.
I spent the better part of several hours watching them go about the business of mating, and took many photographs.
Signature: Georgepat

Mating Orchard Spiders

Hi Georgepat,
Orchard Spiders,
Leucauge venusta, are harmless and beautiful spiders.  Your series of photos documenting the courtship process are quite nice and a wonderful addition to our Bug Love archives.  It should be noted that the coloration is not a clear indication of sex in the Orchard Spider.  The male has the more prominent pedipalps, a pair of extremities that are positioned close to the mandibles, slightly in front of the first pair of true legs.  More information on the Orchard Spider is available on BugGuide.

Mating Orchard Spiders

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination