Currently viewing the category: "Longjawed Orbweavers"
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Subject: Long fangs
Location: Western PA
August 13, 2014 4:49 am
This spider was on my car the length of the spider was about two inch when it was laying flat. I don’t scare easy when getting close to spiders that made webs but he was quick. This guys fangs are very long easy to see without my macro lens on my camera.
First time iv ever see one like this I was unable to if any info on the net with my descriptions. Hope you can help.
The last picture is with a flash to better see the patterns on it’s back.
Signature: Ashley

Long Jawed Orbweaver

Long Jawed Orbweaver

Dear Ashley,
This impressive spider is a Long Jawed Orbweaver,
Tetragnatha elongata, and according to BugGuide they:  “Usually construct their webs in the shade above water.”

Long Jawed Orbweaver

Long Jawed Orbweaver

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: I Have 3 Pet Spiders and do not Know What to Feed Them
Location: Okanagan Region (Beach)
August 4, 2014 5:06 pm
Hi,
I’m Candace (13) and I have 3 “pet” spiders. I caught them all down in a shack in southern British Columbia. I’m curious to find out what kind of spiders they are and what I should be feeding them. They are all in different terrariums with shells at the bottom and I’m keeping them in my room. When it’s light out, I normally keep them in a luke-warm, dark area. Is that what they normally prefer? Could you please help me identify these spiders? They are very dear to me and I would be quite upset if they were to starve to death.
Thank you for your time.
Signature: -Candace

Long Jawed Orbweaver

Long Jawed Orbweaver

Dear Candace,
All of your spiders are species of Orbweavers, and they spin webs to snare prey.  You can feed them flies or other insects that you capture, or you can go to a pet store and purchase crickets to feed the spiders.  The file numbered 1820 appears to be a Long Jawed Orbweaver,
Tetragnatha versicolorand you can compare your pet to this image on BugGuide.  According to BugGuide, their food is “Primarily insects.”

Orbweaver

Orbweaver

Your other two spiders are Orbweavers in the family Araneidae, but we are uncertain of the species.  According to BugGuide, the “Food sources vary, but typically any small insects they catch in their webs. “

Orbweaver

Orbweaver

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Spider I’ve never seen!
Location: Sugar Hill, GA
June 26, 2014 7:25 am
Hello Bugman!
First of all, love the site. I visit often as I am absolutely fascinated by bugs :)
I’m wondering if you can help ID this spider. I found it by my front door late this (summer) morning. I live in Georgia, northeast of Atlanta, and have never seen a spider like this one. I tried to ID it on my own, to no avail.
Please help! My 3 year old daughter and I would love to know what it is.
Thanks!
Signature: Sarah W

Longjawed Orbweaver

Long-Jawed Orbweaver

Dear Sarah,
This is a Long-Jawed Orbweaver in the family Tetragnathidae, and it is most likely in the genus Tetragnatha, but we cannot say for certain which species.  You can compare your individual to this image on BugGuide.

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Subject: Yellow striped spider
Location: North Tamborine, Queensland Australia
January 11, 2014 8:44 pm
Hi bug an, can you tell me what spider this is. A simple search of “yellow striped spider” yielded nothing.
Thanks
Ben
Signature: Thanks Ben

Messy Leaf Curling Spider

Messy Leaf Curling Spider

Hi Ben,
We figured this might be an Orbweaver in the family Araneidae, so we browsed through the family on the Brisbane Insect and Spider site and quickly located the Messy Leaf Curling Spider,
Deliochus zelivira, which though the stripes on the individual pictured are white, otherwise resembles your spider.  The description fits as well stating:  “This spider builds large messy retreat by curling a few green and dry leaves bound together by silks. Male and female can be found in the same retreat during breeding season. Males of this species are more often seen because they wandering around looking for females. Matured females are in the messy large retreat and hardly be seen.”  Armed with a scientific name, we then located the Spiders of Australia website that pictures a yellow striped individual, but the family is indicated as Tetragnathidae, the Long-Jawed Orbweavers.  Arachne.org.au utilizes the same image and explains the taxonomy confusion by indicating:  “Deliochus zelivira, probably the most common of the Deliochus spp., found throughout Australia, appears to have been moved to Tetragnathidae then back to Araneidae. The female can grow to 11 mm, the male 5 mm. They construct a retreat of eucalypt leaves. ”  Dave’s Garden also has a photo.  All indications are that your individual is a male. 

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Subject: A Web with a View for a longjawed orbweaver
Location: Naperville, IL
July 21, 2013 7:28 pm
Dear Daniel~
A longjawed orbweaver, I presume, but Tetragnatha sp. is as far as I could get. This spider was in this exact same position on this asclepias tuberosa every time I passed it for about 48 hours, after which I could no longer find it.
Have a beautiful day!
Signature: Dori Eldridge

Long-Jawed Orbweaver

Long-Jawed Orbweaver

Hi Dori,
We agree that this appears to be a Long-Jawed Orbweaver.  Your milkweed does have a diverse ecosystem occupying it.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Orchard Spider
Location: Southeast Tennessee, Cumberland Plateau
June 17, 2013 9:58 am
From other photos, I believe that this spider who has recently taken up residence near our back porch is an Orchard Spider. In its orb web, I was able to get photos both from above and below.
Thanks for your great resource!
Signature: Bob

Orchard Spider

Orchard Spider

Hi Bob,
In our opinion, your identification of an Orchard Spider,
Leucauge venusta, is correct.  Thanks for sending your wonderful photos of the spider and its web.

Orchard Spider

Orchard Spider

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination