Currently viewing the category: "Jumping Spiders"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Ant with enlarged head?
Location: Rochester, NY
August 30, 2016 10:18 am
Hi, I was studying in my dorm room in Rochester, NY when I noticed a little bug go scurrying by. At first I just thought it was ant carrying something black, but I quickly realized it was something far weirder. I was hoping you could identify it. Thanks.
Signature: Connor

Ant Mimic Jumping Spider

Ant Mimic Jumping Spider

Dear Connor,
Because we have gotten so many comments on the posting this summer, earlier in the week, we began featuring a five year old posting of an Ant Mimic Jumping Spider,
Myrmarachne formicaria, a species that was “Recently introduced from Europe” according to BugGuide where the range is listed as “Roughly Cleveland, OH to Buffalo, NY.”  BugGuide also notes:  “The first specimen records of M. formicaria from North America have all been from Ohio, USA: from Warren, Trumble County on 16 August 2001; the J.H. Barrow Field Station, Portage County on 15 September 2002; and at a residence near Peninsula, Summit County. Additional individuals have been observed by the third author in and around the J.H. Barrow Field Station and the Peninsula residence during the summers of 2003 and 2004. ”  Because of the timeliness of your submission, we have decided to make it the Bug of the Month for September 2016.  Readers who want to see a better image can use this BugGuide image for comparison.  If you have a sighting, please leave a comment with your location.  If you have your own image, you may submit it using the Ask What’s That Bug? link on our site.  We don’t know how this introduction will affect our native ecosystem, but it is possible that this Ant Mimic Jumping Spider may begin to displace native Jumping Spiders if it is a more efficient predator or if it preys upon our native species, and for that reason we are tagging it as an Invasive Exotic species.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: TRACHELAS SPIDER?
Location: Stockton, CA
August 14, 2016 12:21 pm
Can’t find anything quite like this online.
In my house, right next to where I am immobilized with an ankle fracture.
No, I didn’t kill it.
What’s confusing:
1) White pedipalps (or are those eggs or something else?)
2) Marked banding on legs
Signature: Theresa

Jumping Spider

Jumping Spider

Dear Theresa,
This is a Jumping Spider in the family Salticidae, but we do not know the species.  If you need an exact species name, you can try browsing through the postings on BugGuide.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: jumping spider of sorts?
Location: Western Washington state
August 4, 2016 11:43 pm
Found this in my backyard in western Washington state curious on what it is.
Signature: amber toro

Unknown Jumping Spider

Unknown Jumping Spider may be Bronze Jumper

Good Morning Amber,
You are correct that this is a Jumping Spider in the family Salticidae, but despite its distinctive markings, we have been unable to identify the species after scanning through all the genera on BugGuide.  Perhaps one of our readers will have better luck than we have had with a species identification.  Interestingly, as we were linking to BugGuide, we stumbled upon this image of the Bronze Jumper,
Eris militaris, on BugGuide that looks closer than any other image we found. 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: spider
Location: Enumclaw, WA. suburbs
May 6, 2016 12:13 am
Hello,
I live in a small town Enumclaw,Wa. We live near the downtown area so we are home is not too much into the country. Today I noticed an unusual spider I’ve never seen before. This spider was just under the size of a nickel and moved like a jumping spider. I am submitting a photo as I am very curious what it is.
Thanks for all your hard work.
Signature: Noah

I found it on my own, no worries guys.
It’s a red backed jumping spider.
Noah

Johnson's Jumper, we believe

Johnson’s Jumper, we believe

Dear Noah,
Congratulations on self-identifying your Jumping Spider in the family Salticidae.  We believe it is in the genus
Phidippus, a group with many highly variable and similar looking species.  The closest match we could find is on the Pest Control Canada site, though it is most certainly NOT a pest, and it is identified as a Johnson’s Jumper, Phidippus johnsoni.  According to the University of British Columbia Biodiversity site, the species is relatively common in the area.  There is also a similar looking image from Seattle on BugGuide.  According to BugGuide, the Johnson’s Jumper is:  “Mostly black with a red abdomen. The male’s abdomen is entirely red, whereas the female’s abdomen has a black mark down the center.”  That means your individual is a female.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Fascinating Spider
Location: Fairlight NSW Australia
April 28, 2016 7:05 pm
Have been observing this little guy building silk bridges between our tables and chairs on the balcony this morning and wondered if i should stay calmly seated and curious or run around screaming and flailing my arms in the air because its a man eater. What kind of spider is it please?
Signature: Curious Mich

Jumping Spider

Jumping Spider

Dear Curious Mich,
Fear Not.  This Jumping Spider in the family Salticidae is perfectly harmless.  Jumping Spiders do not build webs in which to snare prey, but rather they jump great distances, pouncing on their prey.

Thank you so much. I will continue observing it spinning silk threads to build bridges between my balcony furniture at a longer distance. Appreciate your time and help.
Curious Mich

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Spider in Greenhouse
Location: 78634, Texas,
April 6, 2016 8:28 am
Good day wonderful bug folks. Keep up the good work! I saw a small spider on my greenhouse frame (inside the GH) last night and tried taking a picture. It kept hiding and is upside down in the pic now since she poked out her head from the aluminum frame and I just quickly snapped a pic.
Last year we had a fist sized hole in the ground just outside the greenhouse and I always thought I saw a rather large black arachnid rush in there whenever I approached. Not sure
Signature: Sandy

Bold Jumper, we believe

Bold Jumper, we believe

Dear Sandy,
This fierce predator is a harmless Jumping Spider in the family Salticidae, and the green chelicerae indicate it might be a Bold Jumper,
Phidippus audax, a highly variable species with an extensive range.  Here is a nice image from BugGuideBugGuide also has a nice page illustrating the variability within the species.  Jumping Spiders do not spin webs to trap prey.  Instead, they use their excellent eyesight to locate prey, stalking it if necessary, and then pouncing, often from a considerable distance, when they strike.

Awesome! I was wanting to surprise my relatives when they visit that we have not just Rattle and King snakes but Tarantulas but hey, jumping spider is just as good :)
thanks so much for being bug friendly and educating people that bugs are good for you and not need to be squashed!
The next cool thing I found was a praying mantis on the GH door (see attached)!
With an utter invasion of lady beetles and other critters we went from aphids everywhere to ZILCH! wuhu! Even the milkweeds are almost free!
So cool to live here :)))))
You guys rock!!!!
cheers
Sandy

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination