Currently viewing the category: "Jumping Spiders"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Spider on patio
Location: Los Angeles
April 9, 2015 1:21 pm
Who is his friendly spider?
Signature: Curious patio farmer

Jumping Spider

Jumping Spider

Dear Curious Patio Farmer,
Your Jumping Spider is in the genus
Phidippus, but we are uncertain of the species.  We found a nearly identical match, also from Los Angeles, posted to BugGuide, but it is only identified to the genus level.  It might be Phidippus formosus, and BugGuide provides this comment regarding that name:  “If I’m reading the World Spider Catalog correctly, Phidippus formosus is an older name for what is currently called Phidippus johnsoni.  I don’t have Hogue’s book to see what was pictured, but since it appears to have been published in 1974, shortly after the name change, it was probably a photo of Phidippus Johnsoni and Hogue just didn’t have the most up-to-date name for it.”  Though BugGuide has numerous images of the Johnson Jumper, not exactly matches the coloration and markings on your individual.

Jumping Spider

Jumping Spider

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Subject: Black/white Hairy Spider
Location: Hollywood
March 16, 2015 4:15 pm
Hi Daniel,
This little dude was in my garden today. Mostly black and hairy —with a little bit of white. Looks like fake white eyes on the back. Large green fangs?
1. What is it? 2. Is it poisonous?
Thanks!
Signature: Temple

Bold Jumper

Bold Jumper

Dear Temple,
This jumping spider in the family Salticidae is a Bold Jumper,
Phidippus audax, a conclusion we reached by matching your excellent images to this posting on BugGuide.  There is also an excellent page on BugGuide that depicts the variability within the species.  Jumping Spiders are considered harmless to humans, though a large individual might bite.  Most all spiders are venomous, but very few are dangerous to humans because the venom is either not lethal to humans or the fangs (chelicerae) are too weak to break human skin.  Like other Jumping Spiders, this Bold Jumper does not spin a web to snare its prey.  Jumping Spiders have excellent eyesight and they hunt their prey by jumping, often from great distances.  One final note, your dude is a dudette.

Bold Jumper

Bold Jumper

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Subject: Costa Rican bug
Location: Southern Costa Rica
March 12, 2015 11:36 am
this guy was on a kitchen counter on Playa Cacao by Golfito Costa Rica and is unlike anything I know of, anybody know?
Signature: T Olesen

Jumping Spider

Jumping Spider

Dear T Olesen,
This is a Jumping Spider in the family Salticidae, and because of the long front legs, we would bet that it is a male.  Jumping Spider are harmless to humans.  They do not spin webs to snare prey.  They are hunting spiders.

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Subject: what is this spider?
Location: Los Angeles, California
February 12, 2015 3:20 pm
I discovered this spider on my stairs inside my house. I saved it and got it in a container and took it
outside. It jumps. The size of a finger nail.
Signature: Shannon

Jumping Spider

Jumping Spider

Dear Shannon,
This is some species of Jumping Spider in the genus
Phidippus, possibly Phidippus adumbratus.  Because of your kindness in rescuing this lovely Jumping Spider, we are tagging this submission with the Bug Humanitarian Award.

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Subject: Zebra Jumper
Location: Toledo, OH
October 23, 2014 3:40 pm
Hey there!
Fall is thoroughly set in over here in Toledo, and the bugs are getting harder and harder to track down and enjoy. This little guy was kind enough to hang around in the cold though for me to test my new macro lens on. Thought you might enjoy him!
Signature: Katy

Zebra Jumping Spider

Zebra Jumping Spider

Hi Katy,
Your images of this Zebra Jumping Spider,
Salticus scenicus, are quite nice.  We like the results of your new lens and we look forward to spring and new submissions from you.

Zebra Jumping Spider

Zebra Jumping Spider

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Subject: Jumping spider
Location: Southwest MI
August 18, 2014 6:20 am
Found this fellow on the sliding patio doors to my deck. I live in the middle of an oak forest so spiders are abundant and I consider them my friends. This was the second time I have seen this particular species and I knew it was a jumper from its behavior. From what I can gather it falls in the Habronattus genus. Can you further identify it or give me any other information on it. Twice, while being photographed, it jumped up onto my camera! Thanks for your wonderful site.
Signature: d.k.dodge

Jumping Spider

Jumping Spider

Dear d.k.dodge,
What a beautiful and expressive face your Jumping Spider in the family Salticidae has.  We apologize, be we can’t say for certain what this species is, but your images are postitively gorgeous and we hope perhaps one of our readers will write in with a comment and identification.  We cannot find any images on BugGuide that have the orange face combined with the chevron pattern on the abdomen.  If you happen to learn more, please let us know. 

Jumping Spider

Jumping Spider

Update:  Platycryptus undatus???
Hi again d.k.dodge,
What do you think of these images of
Platycryptus undatus from BugGuide?  This individual has both the chevron markings on the abdomen, the orange mask, and it is found in Michigan.  Here is another example from BugGuide that shows both abdominal markings and facial coloration.

Thank you so much!  Looks like a match to me.  I love knowing the identity of every living thing I see.
Thanks again!
d.k.dodge

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination