Currently viewing the category: "Jumping Spiders"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: spider
Location: Enumclaw, WA. suburbs
May 6, 2016 12:13 am
Hello,
I live in a small town Enumclaw,Wa. We live near the downtown area so we are home is not too much into the country. Today I noticed an unusual spider I’ve never seen before. This spider was just under the size of a nickel and moved like a jumping spider. I am submitting a photo as I am very curious what it is.
Thanks for all your hard work.
Signature: Noah

I found it on my own, no worries guys.
It’s a red backed jumping spider.
Noah

Johnson's Jumper, we believe

Johnson’s Jumper, we believe

Dear Noah,
Congratulations on self-identifying your Jumping Spider in the family Salticidae.  We believe it is in the genus
Phidippus, a group with many highly variable and similar looking species.  The closest match we could find is on the Pest Control Canada site, though it is most certainly NOT a pest, and it is identified as a Johnson’s Jumper, Phidippus johnsoni.  According to the University of British Columbia Biodiversity site, the species is relatively common in the area.  There is also a similar looking image from Seattle on BugGuide.  According to BugGuide, the Johnson’s Jumper is:  “Mostly black with a red abdomen. The male’s abdomen is entirely red, whereas the female’s abdomen has a black mark down the center.”  That means your individual is a female.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Fascinating Spider
Location: Fairlight NSW Australia
April 28, 2016 7:05 pm
Have been observing this little guy building silk bridges between our tables and chairs on the balcony this morning and wondered if i should stay calmly seated and curious or run around screaming and flailing my arms in the air because its a man eater. What kind of spider is it please?
Signature: Curious Mich

Jumping Spider

Jumping Spider

Dear Curious Mich,
Fear Not.  This Jumping Spider in the family Salticidae is perfectly harmless.  Jumping Spiders do not build webs in which to snare prey, but rather they jump great distances, pouncing on their prey.

Thank you so much. I will continue observing it spinning silk threads to build bridges between my balcony furniture at a longer distance. Appreciate your time and help.
Curious Mich

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Spider in Greenhouse
Location: 78634, Texas,
April 6, 2016 8:28 am
Good day wonderful bug folks. Keep up the good work! I saw a small spider on my greenhouse frame (inside the GH) last night and tried taking a picture. It kept hiding and is upside down in the pic now since she poked out her head from the aluminum frame and I just quickly snapped a pic.
Last year we had a fist sized hole in the ground just outside the greenhouse and I always thought I saw a rather large black arachnid rush in there whenever I approached. Not sure
Signature: Sandy

Bold Jumper, we believe

Bold Jumper, we believe

Dear Sandy,
This fierce predator is a harmless Jumping Spider in the family Salticidae, and the green chelicerae indicate it might be a Bold Jumper,
Phidippus audax, a highly variable species with an extensive range.  Here is a nice image from BugGuideBugGuide also has a nice page illustrating the variability within the species.  Jumping Spiders do not spin webs to trap prey.  Instead, they use their excellent eyesight to locate prey, stalking it if necessary, and then pouncing, often from a considerable distance, when they strike.

Awesome! I was wanting to surprise my relatives when they visit that we have not just Rattle and King snakes but Tarantulas but hey, jumping spider is just as good :)
thanks so much for being bug friendly and educating people that bugs are good for you and not need to be squashed!
The next cool thing I found was a praying mantis on the GH door (see attached)!
With an utter invasion of lady beetles and other critters we went from aphids everywhere to ZILCH! wuhu! Even the milkweeds are almost free!
So cool to live here :)))))
You guys rock!!!!
cheers
Sandy

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Exotic Banana Stowaway or Fear Running Amok
Location:  Ontario
March 26, 2016 6:22 pm
Hi BugMan!!
I received a photo from a friend recently looking for some help IDing a spider because I enjoy searching through guides and web photos to try my amateur hand at insect identification. Fun fact: if you browse spiders on your phone on public transit people will move away from you 😉
Anyway, I am at a loss for this guy. My best guess has been something in the Salticidae family, but I cannot see a hint of green at the chelicerae, nor could I find those specific markings. I am frustrated and I must ask for help – hopefully, this is one of the lucky posts that makes it through.
Bit of background. Friend is a produce manager in southern Ontario and had this spider returned from a customer who stated that it had been found in bananas purchased there. Bananas came from Ecuador, but it’s pretty difficult to ascertain where the spider actually came from. Unfortunately, their company policy is to destroy any spiders that are returned in produce – BOO! and I have not seen the spider in person. The size has been stated to be approximately 1cm-1.25cm and she claims that there is no green (or blue, or any other colour) present at the chelicerae. Also, that the manner of walking is similar to a tarantula, but I don’t see the similarity in the hairiness and really think that the body structure is much more similar to a jumper.
Here’s hoping you can help end this frustration
Signature: A frustrated friend

Jumping Spider, but what species????

Jumping Spider, but what species????

Dear frustrated friend,
Your submission has caused us to lament the day that portable communication devices superseded home computers as the delivery method of choice for readers submitting identification requests to our site.  At that time, spelling and grammar took a back seat to garbled and incoherent communication replete with abbreviations and new acronyms.  The positive side of folks using cellular telephones is that they virtually all have cameras built in, which allowed more folks to capture images of the bugs they encounter, but verbal communication took several steps back as instant gratification caused terse phrases to replace complete sentences.  Thanks so much for your chatty request.  This is indeed a Jumping Spider in the family Salticidae, but we are not certain of the species.  Not all Jumping Spiders have metallic chelicerae.  The distinctive spinnerets at the end of the abdomen should make identification a bit easier, but our initial attempts have not provided a good species match for you.  We also want to comment on the produce policy of destroying spiders found on bananas.  There is a large Huntsman Spider,
Heteropoda venatoria, that is now found throughout the world in warmer cities where bananas were shipped.  Many years ago, there were numerous stories of Tarantulas emerging from shipped bananas, and most of those Tarantulas were likely Huntsman Spiders.  The Huntsman Spiders, or Banana Spiders, are harmless, and they are actually quite beneficial in tropical countries where they hunt at night, feeding on Cockroaches.

Thank you Daniel. I really appreciate the confirmation.
It seems as though there may be some ramifications for my friend as a result of me adding the location in and I wonder if it’s possible if the town name could be removed?
I had asked if I could send it to your site and was granted permission for that (as it was her photo), but she was later warned about the potential for losing her job as a result of negative attention to the store and I was not informed until I sent your response. It’s a very small town with a single grocery store and I would hate for my friend to lose her job because she and I were trying to ID a spider.
My apologies for being a pain.
Cheers,
Vanessa

Done.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Phidippus audax
Location: Toronto, Ontario
March 15, 2016 4:56 pm
I saved this darling little guy the other day, just in time for Save a Spider Day on March 14th. I will keep him comfortable inside until it is warm enough to release him.
I located some flightless fruitflies for him tonight.
Salticidae are my favourite family of spiders and these little P. audax have so much personality!
Signature: Vanessa – Lover of all spiders

Bold Jumper eats Fruit Fly

Bold Jumper eats Fruit Fly

Dear Vanessa,
Your image of a Bold Jumper eating a Fruit Fly is quite gorgeous.  Though they are commonly called Fruit Flies, members of the genus Drosophila are actually classified as Vinegar Flies.  Because of your dedication to saving and feeding this Bold Jumper, we are tagging your posting with the Bug Humanitarian Award.  Thanks also for drawing our attention to Save a Spider Day which was profiled on the Smithsonian Magazine site.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: a golden leaf dwelling spider from Costa Rcia
Location: Manuel Antonio Park, Costa Rica
January 4, 2016 9:43 am
Hi there,
Took this pick of a leaf nesting spider in costa rica and I am having a hard time identifying it. She was very aware of her surroundings and watched my every move as I set up the camera for the shot.
Signature: Michael K

Jumping Spider

Jumping Spider

Dear Michael,
Your images are quite wonderful.  This is a Jumping Spider in the family Salticidae.  Jumping Spiders do not build webs to snare prey, but rather hunt, often jumping on their prey from a substantial distance away.  Because they hunt instead of passively awaiting prey to wander into a web, Jumping Spiders like other hunting spiders including Wolf Spiders, need better eyesight.  As you observed, the vision of Jumping Spiders is quite good.  Though they do not build webs to snare prey, some Jumping Spiders, like your individual, do spin shelters for protection.  We will attempt to provide you with a species identification, but our initial attempt proved fruitless.

Jumping Spider

Jumping Spider

That is marvelous, Daniel, thank you!
M

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination