Currently viewing the category: "Huntsman Spiders and Giant Crab Spiders"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Possible bird spider
Location: Panama
February 10, 2014 1:44 pm
Hi my name is Wes and I found this spider walking across the house I was building in the middle of the jungle in Panama. So I took a picture of it and Put it on Facebook. People were saying it was a huge recluse, I think it is a bird spider. Can you tell from these two photos what this might be? I am located in Bocas Del Toro On Isla Colon. This photo was taken February 1st. This house I am building is well in the jungle so it has very little traffic,
Signature: Wes Griffin

Huntsman Spider

Huntsman Spider

Hi Wes,
We believe this is a Huntsman Spider or Giant Crab Spider in the family Sparassidae.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Large Spider found in and around house in Jakarta, Indonesia
Location: Jakarta, Indonesia
January 30, 2014 7:17 pm
My daughter noticed the 1st spider on our wall inside our house in Jakarta, Indonesia. Earlier this week I found a larger spider of a similar species on the outside of my daughter’s window. For reference, the indoor spider is 2cm from bottom of abdomen to head (minus front fangs/legs). The one on the window was larger, about 4-5cm.
I am trying to reassure my wife that these spiders are not dangerous to humans, but I’m having a hard time locating any images for tropical spiders in Indonesia. Any help would be appreciated!
Signature: Chris Morris

Male Huntsman Spider

Male Huntsman Spider

Dear Chris,
You are correct that this male Huntsman Spider,
Heteropoda venatoria, is harmless to humans.  These Huntsman Spiders are nocturnal hunters that do not build a web to snare prey.  They prey upon Cockroaches as well as other insects, so they are beneficial around the house.  Heteropoda venatoria has a rather large global distribution, especially in tropical and semitropical port cities and they increased their native range greatly by hitching rides on ships with banana shipments.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Malaysian Fishing Spider
Location: Malaysia
January 20, 2014 8:56 am
Came across this spider well camouflaged against granite rocks inches above rushing mountain stream water. Was motionless except for twitches when hit by a large drop of spray. My web crawling seems to point at the dolomedes family.
Would appreciate your opinion and i do believe its as pretty if not more so than you white banded one.
Thanks
Signature: N.Sathesh

Malaysian Spider

Lichen Huntsman Spider

Dear N. Santhesh,
We just returned from a week away from the office and your request is our first new posting.  Your letter is intriguing and your photos are positively gorgeous.  The spider appears to be iridescent.  We do not believe this is a
Fishing Spider in the genus Dolomedes.  We do not even believe it is a Nursery Web Spider in the family Pisauridae.  We would love to know if you observed any behavior that led you to believe this spider fishes for prey and is semi-aquatic.  Do you think it is possible that it fell in the water and is not really a spider that catches prey beneath the surface of the water? 

Malaysian Spider

Pandercetes Huntsman Spider

Dear Mr Marlos,
It was perfectly at home in its environment, on the side of granite boulders  just inches above the surface of a fast flowing freezing (by our tropical standards) mountain stream. There was no web to be seen any where near it and from the spines on its legs and body, which i assumed was for trapping a layer of air  i surmised that it was a diving spider of some kind. I did observe it for quite some time and in that period it did not move into the water or away from it but it did not appear injured or unwell.
N.Sathesh

Dear N. Sathesh,
Thank you so much for the additional information.  We will continue to research the identity of this beautiful and interesting spider.

Closeup of eye pattern

Closeup of eye pattern of Huntsman Spider

Update:  Eye Arrangement
We have cropped the image to focus on the eye arrangement which does not look like the Malaysian Fishing Spider pictured on TravelBlog nor the family Pisauridae eye arrangement pictured on Bugguide.
  We are going to reach out to Mandy Howe for assistance.

Dear Mr Marlos,
This is the stream in which that spider was found. Incidentally just for your interest as i was standing on one of these boulders this blue winged insect (perhaps a wasp?) the size of my big toe landed, when if flew off it left this carcass of a large spider it had been carrying about underneath.
N.Sathesh

Malaysian Stream Habitat

Malaysian Stream Habitat

Hi again N. Sathesh,
Thanks for sending us the habitat photo.  We are going to create a new posting of the wasp and new spider.

Update:  January 23, 2014
We just received a comment indicating that this resembles a Lichen Huntsman Spider in the genus
Pandercetes, and the photos on FlickRiver support that identification.

Dear Mr Marlos,
Yes it does look the part doesn’t it, This individual must have decided that it could make a good living at this location. The stream was full of fish and insects such as water skaters, perhaps in this section of roiling water some of these potential prey might get into difficulties that could facilitate capture.
Thanks for the info.
N.Sathesh

Mandy Howe confirms Pandercetes species.  January 23, 2014
Hi Daniel,
Yep, genus Pandercetes of family Sparassidae is spot on! There are a handful of species in that genus that could live in Malaysia. It’s usually the males that are more colorful and iridescent, so that may be what this one is (though I can’t see the pedipalps very well to verify). “Lichen Spider” is definitely a fitting nickname!

Wow.  Thanks so much Mandy.
Daniel

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Spider
Location: Phantom Pass near Knysna,, The Cape, South Africa
January 9, 2014 10:09 am
We woke up with this spider inside our bed netting whilst on holiday in the Cape in South Africa. We were staying in an tree top Eco lodge so were surrounded by trees. Everyone have told us different names so we want to finally know what it is! Thank you for your help! The spider was about 8-10 cm including legs.
Signature: Katarina S-C

Huntsman Spider

Huntsman Spider, Possibly Cape Rain Spider

Dear Katarina,
This is such an interesting photograph.  Was the spider crawling on a pane of glass?  We cannot figure out how else you could have gotten such a high quality ventral view.    We believe this is a Huntsman Spider.  It looks very much like the Badge Huntsman Spiders of Australia in the genus
Neosparassus.  It also resembles this Huntsman Spider posted to Ranger Diaries from Kruger National Park.  The underside of a Huntsman Spider (we believe the genus Palystes) that is posted to Arachnipedia looks very similar to your spiderThe Cape Rain Spider, Palystes castaneus, which is pictured on ISpot is a very strong possible identification for your spider.

Hi Daniel,
Yes, the spider was crawling on the outside of the glass wall to our Eco lodge :-) after I put it outside on the balcony after encouraging it to climb into a bathroom bin with a hairbrush! Thank you for your help!
Kind regards
Katarina

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Spider
Location: Kruger National Park, South.
January 10, 2014 4:35 am
Saw this one in Kruger National Park 31.-12.-2013.
Could you tell me what specie?
Signature: Michael

Probably Huntsman Spider

Probably Huntsman Spider

Dear Michael,
Though there is not much detail in your image, the general shape of the spider leads us to believe that this is a Huntsman Spider, probably a male and possibly
Heteropoda venatoria which is a nonnative species introduced to South Africa.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: My Baja Roomate
Location: La Ventana, Baja California Sur, Mexico
December 11, 2013 9:47 pm
I’m guessing from your other photos that this may be a female Huntsman spider. The location is La Ventana, Baja California Sur. If she indeed kills cockroaches, maybe we should let her stay. Is she poisonous?
Signature: Stacey

Huntsman Spider

Huntsman Spider

Dear Stacey,
This is indeed a Huntsman Spider or Giant Crab Spider, probably in the genus
Olios.  Most all spiders have venom, but very few are considered dangerous to humans.  This Huntsman Spider poses no threat to you.  It is doubtful that you will be bitten if you allow the spider to cohabitate with you, but a bite may occur if you carelessly handle the spider.  Female Spiders defending eggs can get aggressive.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination