Currently viewing the category: "Huntsman Spiders and Giant Crab Spiders"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: spider
Location: kalloni – lesvos-greece (north aegean)
July 3, 2016 6:18 am
hi its about a spider i found here some details
place: kalloni – lesvos- greece in a church (was climbing the wall)
june-2016
size fits in grown mans palm
thanks
Signature: spider

Huntsman Spider: Eusparassus walckenaeri

Huntsman Spider: Eusparassus walckenaeri

Because the second set of legs is longer than the first set of legs, we suspect this is a Huntsman Spider or Giant Crab Spider in the family Sparassidae which is profiled on the Australian Museum site. We searched for images from Lesvos and discovered this Alamy posting identified as Eusparassus walckenaeri.  We verified that identification on Araneae Spiders of Europe.  On The Natural History Museum of Crete site, it states:  “This is a common spider of the Eastern Mediterranean. It is characterized by its large body size (5 cm) that looks even larger because of the long legs always laterally extended, and by an iridescent light which may be observed on its outer surface. It can be found in open ground as well as inside houses where it eats small and large insects, especially cockroaches.”  There are also several images of Eusparassus walckenaeri from Lesbos on FocusNatura. Your image is positively gorgeous.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Huge spider
Location: Downtown Pensacola, FL
May 10, 2016 4:44 pm
I captured and released this monster in Pensacola today. The pictures don’t show his true size. I’m pretty sure he could take down an alligator. Aside from scorpions and tarantulas I’ve never seen anything this big. What is this bug?
Sent from my iPhone
Signature: Bob in Pensacola

Male Banana Spider

Male Banana Spider

Dear Bob in Pensacola,
Huntsman Spider and Banana Spider are two common names for your male Heteropoda venatoria, a harmless species that is tolerated in many parts of the tropics because they are nocturnal hunters that do not spin webs and that really enjoy eating Cockroaches.  They are called Banana Spiders because they are the mythical Tarantulas that entered the U.S. on banana shipments for time centuries.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Giant Huntsman Spider?
Location: Rural San Diego County, CA
April 12, 2016 8:21 pm
Hello,
This bug was found in my home near the ceiling. He was never you big-perhaps 2-3″ wide and 1-2″ long. I live in a rural area and it is not uncommon to find Tarantulas in the house and MANY black widows outside. However, I’ve not seen this one before. A Google search leads me to believe it is a Giant Huntsman Spider & I would love to be sure so I can learn more about it. Thanks for your help!
Signature: Anna

Huntsman Spider

Huntsman Spider

Dear Anna,
You are correct that this is a Huntsman Spider or Giant Crab Spider, and we are relatively certain it is the native
Olios giganteus, based on images posted to BugGuide.

Thank you so much for the prompt response! Sorry for the type-o in the first email.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Spider in Poway Garden
Location: Poway CA
April 10, 2016 4:02 am
April 6th my kids found this spider in our empty rain gauge.. Poor guy is probably relocated now because it is pouring now! Thanks
Signature: JR

Huntsman Spider

Huntsman Spider

Dear JR,
This is a harmless, native Huntsman Spider or Giant Crab Spider in the genus
Olios.  They are nocturnal hunters that do not spin webs for snaring prey.

Great thank you! So it’s a good guy out in our garden. Great to hear. And I love your website. Keep up the good work!

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: PLEASE help ID this spider
Location: Morongo VALLEY, CA
March 6, 2016 3:21 pm
Help ID this spider. I live in morongo VALLEY CA., I just have the bottom side of the spider…thanks, Gil
Signature: Help

Giant Crab Spider

Giant Crab Spider

This is a Giant Crab Spider or Huntsman Spider in the genus Olios.  It is not considered dangerous to humans.

Thanks, wife very frighten of this spider, now she’s NOT… Thanks, again, do you service houses in the Morongo Valley area? Have ant problem..thanks again, Gil and Leslie

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Arava wolf spider
Location: Arava, Israel
January 17, 2016 2:02 am
Hey there Bug People,
This guy (girl?) came to say hello yesterday morning while I was on a hiking trip in Southern Israel. It must be one of the most beautiful, and big wolf spiders I’ve ever seen.
Some quick research online says it’s the very recently described Cerbalus aravaensis Levy, 2007, that lives in the small sandy area in the center of the Arava (a long, narrow strip south of the Dead Sea, on the border between Jordan and Israel).
Enjoy all ye bug lovers!
Signature: Ben from Israel

Wolf Spider from Israel

Huntsman Spider from Israel

Happy New Year Ben,
This truly is a gorgeous Spider and we are very thankful that you have sent us your wonderful images.  Thank you also for providing a scientific name, however, when we began to research that name, we realized this is NOT a Wolf Spider.  Structurally, your spider differs from the shape we normally associate with Wolf Spiders.  Our first clue was the on Israel’s Nature Site where images of this species seem to be classified under the Giant Crab Spider or Huntsman Spider family Sparassidae.  ITIS confirms the family as Sparassidae.  The Gallery Through My Lens site provides the common name White Lady Huntsman Spider.  The Documenting Reality site also indicates the family is Sparassidae and provides this information:  “ScienceDaily (Jan. 11, 2010) — A new and previously unknown species of spider has been discovered in the dune of the Sands of Samar in the southern Arava region of Israel by a team of scientists from the Department of Biology in the University of Haifa-Oranim. Unfortunately, however, its habitat is endangered.
‘The discovery of this new spider illustrates our obligation to preserve the dune,’ says Dr. Shanas, who headed the team of scientists.
The Sands of Samar are the last remaining sand dune in Israeli territory in the southern Arava region. In the past, the sands stretched across some 7 square kilometers, but due to the rezoning of areas for agriculture and sand quarries, the sands have been reduced to fewer than 3 square kilometers.
During a course of studies that Dr. Shanas’s research team has carried out in the region, they discovered this new spider, a member of the Cerbalus genus. Since it has been found in the Arava, it has been given the name
Cerbalus aravensis.”

Wolf Spider

Huntsman Spider

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination