Currently viewing the category: "Huntsman Spiders and Giant Crab Spiders"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Australian wasp
Location: Hornsby NSW
December 3, 2016 1:03 am
My wife captured this shot in our front garden. I wonder if the wasp removed the huntsman spiders legs for transport purposes?
Signature: Australian wasp

Spider Wasp and Huntsman Prey

Spider Wasp and Huntsman Prey

We get several very dramatic submissions from Australia each year of Spider Wasps in the family Pompilidae with Huntsman Spider prey.  The female Spider Wasps stings and paralyzes the Huntsman Spider and then drags it back to her burrow where she lays an egg on the paralyzed Spider.  When the egg hatches, the wasp larva feeds on the living but paralyzed Spider.  It appears that your Spider Wasp has removed the legs of the Huntsman Spider by biting them off in order to make transportation easier.  Based on images posted to the Brisbane Insect site, we believe your Spider Wasp is in the genus Fabriogenia.

Spider Wasp and Huntsman Prey

Spider Wasp and Huntsman Prey

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Costa Rican tarantula – grey and black with red eyes
Location: Costa Rica
October 30, 2016 7:00 pm
Hi,
My husband and I live in Costa Rica, We have a large black tarantula that lives in a hole outside our front door. (2nd attached photo ) We’ve named her Harriet. 🙂 But we came across a very strange looking tarantula the other day – it is grey and black with red eyes (1st attached photo) I could not find anything online that looked similar so figured I would run it by you guys! Let me know what you think – thanks! We also found a 3rd tarantula at our house I also attached a photo of. It is hard to identify them online.
Signature: Kari Pinkerton Silcox

Huntsman Spider from Costa Rica

Huntsman Spider from Costa Rica

Dear Kari,
After opening three of your four email submissions, we feel confident stating that we expect you to thwart our ability to identify exotic species online before long.  This positively gorgeous spider is not a Tarantula, but rather a Huntsman Spider or Giant Crab Spider in the family Sparassidae.  They are easily confused with Tarantulas.  They are large, and they hunt nocturnally without building a web, and some tropical species are rumored to be quite venomous.  The first hint we had, other than starting with a known family and a location, was an image identified as “A huntsman spider, formerly
Olios now being reclassified” on Minibeast Wildlife on a page devoted to the attraction that “The spider fauna on the Osa Peninsula is rich and diverse.”  We found this image of a Huntsman posted to SpiderzRule/BadgeHuntsman page that is described as:  “About 3 to 3 1/2 inches across the legs. Found at night under a heliconia leaf along a rainforest stream at about 200 Meters elevation near Drake’s Bay, Costa Rica. No web seen.”  In this gorgeous WeHeartIt image, you can clearly see the eye pattern of the six eyes, and you can also discern that what you mistook for eyes are actually red ocelli or false eyes on the chelicerae.  Because of several reasons, beginning with the enthusiasm you have written to us with such lovely Costa Rican species, and because it is the First of the Month, we are tagging this submission as the Bug of The Month for November 2016.  Since we do not like to combine different taxonomical categories on our site, we will post your Tarantula images independently.  You are also making us want to start a Costa Rica tag. 

Huntsman Eye Pattern

Huntsman Eye Pattern

Thank you so much Daniel, I really appreciate your time. The interesting bugs in Costa Rica are mind blowing, we have endless photos of cool critters and I didn’t want to overwhelm your inbox too much with all my photos, although it was tempting, haha. But if you do a Costa Rica tag or section please let me know and I am happy to submit some more interesting insect photos!
I shared your Bug of the Month on my Costa Rica travel blog facebook page (Happy Coconuts Travel Blog), that is exciting to be featured. Thanks for doing what you do! 🙂
Here is a photo blog I published a while back on all the interesting creatures outside our door on the edge of the Osa Peninsula of Costa rica if you’re interested in checking out some more cool insect/bug/critter photos:
http://www.happycoconutstravelblog.com/blog/welcome-to-the-jungle
Pura Vida!
Kari Silcox
www.happycoconutstravelblog.com

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What sort is it?
Location: Puerto Viejo, Costa Rica
August 3, 2016 6:47 am
Saw this spider eating a cricket in our home in Costa Rica. The spider was pretty hairy and had a big body (between 1 and 2 cm).
What sort is it?
Signature: Marc

Giant Crab Spider eats Cricket

Giant Crab Spider eats Cricket

Dear Marc,
There is not enough detail in your image to make out the eye arrangement, which often helps to identify a family, but the long front two pairs of legs indicates that this is probably a Giant Crab Spider or Huntsman Spider in the family Sparassidae, but we cannot be certain of the species.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: spider
Location: kalloni – lesvos-greece (north aegean)
July 3, 2016 6:18 am
hi its about a spider i found here some details
place: kalloni – lesvos- greece in a church (was climbing the wall)
june-2016
size fits in grown mans palm
thanks
Signature: spider

Huntsman Spider: Eusparassus walckenaeri

Huntsman Spider: Eusparassus walckenaeri

Because the second set of legs is longer than the first set of legs, we suspect this is a Huntsman Spider or Giant Crab Spider in the family Sparassidae which is profiled on the Australian Museum site. We searched for images from Lesvos and discovered this Alamy posting identified as Eusparassus walckenaeri.  We verified that identification on Araneae Spiders of Europe.  On The Natural History Museum of Crete site, it states:  “This is a common spider of the Eastern Mediterranean. It is characterized by its large body size (5 cm) that looks even larger because of the long legs always laterally extended, and by an iridescent light which may be observed on its outer surface. It can be found in open ground as well as inside houses where it eats small and large insects, especially cockroaches.”  There are also several images of Eusparassus walckenaeri from Lesbos on FocusNatura. Your image is positively gorgeous.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Huge spider
Location: Downtown Pensacola, FL
May 10, 2016 4:44 pm
I captured and released this monster in Pensacola today. The pictures don’t show his true size. I’m pretty sure he could take down an alligator. Aside from scorpions and tarantulas I’ve never seen anything this big. What is this bug?
Sent from my iPhone
Signature: Bob in Pensacola

Male Banana Spider

Male Banana Spider

Dear Bob in Pensacola,
Huntsman Spider and Banana Spider are two common names for your male Heteropoda venatoria, a harmless species that is tolerated in many parts of the tropics because they are nocturnal hunters that do not spin webs and that really enjoy eating Cockroaches.  They are called Banana Spiders because they are the mythical Tarantulas that entered the U.S. on banana shipments for time centuries.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Giant Huntsman Spider?
Location: Rural San Diego County, CA
April 12, 2016 8:21 pm
Hello,
This bug was found in my home near the ceiling. He was never you big-perhaps 2-3″ wide and 1-2″ long. I live in a rural area and it is not uncommon to find Tarantulas in the house and MANY black widows outside. However, I’ve not seen this one before. A Google search leads me to believe it is a Giant Huntsman Spider & I would love to be sure so I can learn more about it. Thanks for your help!
Signature: Anna

Huntsman Spider

Huntsman Spider

Dear Anna,
You are correct that this is a Huntsman Spider or Giant Crab Spider, and we are relatively certain it is the native
Olios giganteus, based on images posted to BugGuide.

Thank you so much for the prompt response! Sorry for the type-o in the first email.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination