Currently viewing the category: "Huntsman Spiders and Giant Crab Spiders"
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Subject: Kauai Vacation Home Spider
Location: Princeville, Kauai, Hawaii
May 13, 2015 11:44 pm
Mr. Bugman,
I first identified a spider in the laundry area of the house I’m renting using your site. It appeared to be a Huntsman Spider and it made sense, it’s damp and I’ve seen a cockroach or two in there. I named that spider Dick and he’s 4-5″ big. Now I just scared the bajesus out of myself finding a much larger spider, who I named Bob which is twice as large as Dick, near the area that Dick is (or was, Dick looks a little rough like he got beat up by Bob).
I’m sure it’s just another Huntsman Spider but I wanted to share it with your site.
Signature: Kauai Spider Bro?

Huntsman spider

Huntsman spider

You are correct that this is a Huntsman Spider, probably Heteropoda venatoria, but we think you should change Bob’s name to Roberta as we believe she is a female.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What’s this spider
Location: Eastern Caribbean-Nevis
May 8, 2015 5:36 pm
Hi,
I live in the Caribbean, St. Kitts & Nevis. We have a spider recently that I’m not familiar with and don’t like finding in my shower as I am a spider phobe! I have a friend who has started finding these at their house also and she does not like them any better than I do. Can you please tell me what it might be and if it has any sort of nasty bite? I’ve had a couple of bad bites in my time that were not fun at all.
Thank you when and if you can answer!
Signature: islandlady

Huntsman Spider

Huntsman Spider

Dear islandlady,
We agree with your comment that this is a Huntsman Spider.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: huntsman
Location: Perth,Western Australia
April 16, 2015 6:30 am
I just sent you a msg re-paraylised huntsman on my windowsill and didnt have the link to send a photo so here they are.
What can i do with it?

Subject: Huntsman Spider
April 16, 2015 6:02 am
I live in western Australia. Huntsman spiders are common but never really seen in my area, however with the change in weather in the last week i’ve seen 2 being dragged by wasps. One made it back to its nest while the other couldn’t quite get it up the wall into the tiny hole. Now i have a paraylised huntsman sitting on my windowsill and have no idea what to do with it. Can you help?
Signature: zoe

Spider Wasp and Huntsman Spider

Spider Wasp and Huntsman Spider

Dear Zoe,
Female Spider Wasps in the family Pompilidae sting and paralyze Spiders to feed their young, laying an egg on the paralyzed spider which provides living and fresh (not dead and dried out)
food for the developing larva that eats its still living meal.  Your letter did not indicate why the Spider Wasps left behind the spiders, but we would urge you to not interfere in the future if that is what happened.  It takes tremendous effort for a female Spider Wasp to provide for her brood.  If enough venom was injected into the spider, it will most likely not recover.  We have numerous postings from Australia of Spider Wasps and Huntsman Spider prey.

Hi Daniel, thank you for your reply. My apologies, I had sent 2 different questions the second just contained photo’s. I can promise I didn’t interfere with anything. I seem to have nesting’s of wasps under the house and also in the roof.  The wasp simply gave up trying to pull the huntsman up the wall. It went up and down 3 times, nearly getting there on the 3rd attempt but seemed to give up and left it on the windowsill. I know its pretty much a lost battle for the huntsman and I have left it alone incase the wasp came back but it has not. So I guess my question is what to do with the paralysed but still living spider on my window? What do you suggest?

We would let nature take its course because we are guessing it is on the outside.

Update:  May 14, 2015
Hi Daniel,
I have been in contact with you previously as you can see from the e-mails below with regards to a huntsman spider that was left on my windowsill. The reason I am getting back in contact with you is I need to move it because my son is nearly able to reach the sill and has taken interest in what’s sitting on it. So figuring as its been a month I went to move it and to my surprise our huntsman has flinched its body and its legs. So this is my predicament… I need to move it as my son will soon be able to grab it and probably will do if I’m not looking, and even though it was stung and paralysed by a wasp our huntsman seems to have regained some movement. The poor thing has been sitting there for a month but has shown me (only moments ago) that it has some fight left. What can I do? I would not feel right placing the huntsman just anywhere which is why I am asking for you to help guide me on the best possible solution which may just preserve this ones life should it fully recover. I do want to make clear also that I never interfere with nature and its way of life but certain situations like this sometimes need a little helping hand however big or small.
I would really appreciate it if you could advise me on the best place to put him, I am simply not going to just throw him in the bin or out on the lawn.
Many thanks in advance, I look forward to your reply
Kind Regards
Zoe Delaney

Hi Zoe,
We would suggest a sheltered location outdoors, perhaps under an overturned flower pot or some other place that will offer some protection from predators and the elements.

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Subject: Spider in Flores, Indonesia
Location: Labuanbajo, Flores, Indonesia
February 4, 2015 6:24 am
Found this spider in my house. Very fast and about 7 centimeter diameter (including legs). Do you know what it is?
Signature: Chris

Huntsman Spider

Huntsman Spider

Hi Chris,
This is a Huntsman Spider or Giant Crab Spider,
Heteropoda venatoria, and it is considered harmless to humans.  This species is also called a Banana Spider because they were often imported with bunches of banana and they have become established in warm coastal cities throughout the world because of global shipments of bananas.  Huntsman Spiders do not build a web, but they hunt their prey, often Cockroaches, at night, so they can be considered beneficial.

Wow super quick. Thanks a ton!
Thanks,
Chris

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Subject: Haitian Sensation
Location: Cap-Haïtien, République d’Haïti
January 30, 2015 12:45 am
Hallo,
What an informative website. So, Giant Crab Spider, Sparassid, Olios, I guess. May I ask for some help in identification, please? This was seen in northern Haiti … no unnecessary carnage though I can’t speak to her relationship with the local cockroach community.
Thank you,
Signature: James

Huntsman Spider

Huntsman Spider

Hi James,
You have the family correct, but this Huntsman Spider or Giant Crab Spider is
Heteropoda venatoria, a species that has spread to warm coastal cities throughout the world with shipments of bananas, hence another common name of Banana Spider.  This individual is a male.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Wasp and it’s eight legged prey
Location: Mooroolbark, Victoria, Australia
December 18, 2014 1:11 am
Hi,
I saw this wasp yesterday (December 18) and as you can see it has caught a spider, and quite a large one. The wasp itself was about an inch long maybe (as you can see in the pics it’s about half the height of a standard house brick).
I didn’t see the initial attack, but was walking by and saw it dragging the spider by its face (do spiders even have “faces”? haha) through the leaf litter by the side of the house. I watched it drag the spider at least 5 meters to the front of the house where it then hauled it up the wall with apparent ease (the first picture) and pulled it into the gap in the bricks as demonstrated in the last picture.
I found the whole thing quite amazing. It was like watching a documentary :)
I would love to know what kind of wasp this is. Pity I couldn’t get better pictures, but hopefully they’re enough to identify this awesome wasp.
I was also wondering a few things about the spider. If that spider was on my bedroom wall, I would call it a “Huntsman” but I don’t know it’s actual name. Was the spider going to end up as the wasps meal, or was the spider going to have eggs laid in it, so they can hatch and consume the spider alive? Is that even something wasps do or am I just being creative? Haha
Thanks
I’m wondering if the spider is for food, or whether it’s for the wasp to deposit eggs into.
Signature: Matt P

Spider Wasp preys upon Huntsman Spider

Spider Wasp preys upon Huntsman Spider

Dear Matt,
We have no shortage of Australian Spider Wasps with their Huntsman Spider (yes your ID on the spider is correct) prey on our site, most likely because they are a common Australian summer sighting that corresponds to the dearth of interesting North American sightings of our northern winter.  You are also correct that the female Spider Wasp will lay an egg on the Huntsman Spider which will provide a fresh meal for the developing Spider Wasp larva as it feeds on the still living but paralyzed Huntsman Spider.  We believe the Spider Wasp is
Cryptocheilus bicolor.  Spider Wasps will frequently climb a wall or fence dragging the Huntsman Spider so they can glide with the prey as it would be too difficult to take off from the ground with such a heavy load.

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination