Currently viewing the category: "Green Lynx"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Walk Through Natural Area Turns Up Interesting Critters
Location: Juno Beach, Florida
December 2, 2015 12:06 pm
Hello Whats That Bug!
Love your site – use it all the time to identify the small creepy crawlies we find on Palm Beach County natural areas. Usually I can successfully find the critters name while looking through the photos on your web site. I am having a bit of trouble with a pesky caterpillar which defies identification. It was found at Juno Dunes Natural Area in Juno Beach, Florida. There were several on the same plant. Any help in naming this guy (I’m calling him Harry for now) will be appreciated. I am also including two other photos taken during my walk through Juno Dunes Natural Area – one of a Carolina mantid (didn’t see wings, so I’m assuming it is a juvenile) and a lynx spider (I assume it is a green lynx, but it doesn’t look quite right). Thanks for all you do to ensure the proper identification of insects and arachnids!
Signature: Ann Mathews

Green Lynx Spider

Green Lynx Spider

Dear Ann,
Your image of a Green Lynx Spider is positively gorgeous, and because we do not need to do any research, we can post it immediately.  Your other requests will require a bit or more of research, and we are postponing that until later.  Additionally, because your three attached images represent three unrelated groups of Arthropods, we will be creating three separate postings.

Thanks for replying so quickly. Okay, so I at least had the green lynx spider identified correctly. I guess the mantid may be an exotic Chinese mantis – I was looking up pictures of them at the same time and thought there might be a possibility that the mantid in my picture was an exotic. And for now, the caterpillar’s name will remain “Harry” until further notice. I appreciate all your help – What’s That Bug has made updating our natural area wildlife listings much easier!
Ann Mathews

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Green Lynx Spiders Everywhere!
Location: Palm Beach County, Florida
August 28, 2015 10:43 am
Hello What’s That Bug!
I was exploring Pine Glades Natural Area in northern Palm Beach County, Florida and came across lots of bug and spider life on the grasses and Spanish needles growing along the nature trail. I was able to sweet-talk a beautiful adult green lynx spider into letting me get close with my camera to snap a few pictures. I also came across very tiny spiders sitting on the Spanish needle flowers just waiting to pounce on any small bug that walked by. I believe these tiny spiders are baby green lynx spiders. I included a picture – please let me know if I am correct. It never ceases to amaze me that so much life can be found on one plant! Love your web site – I find myself visiting it frequently to help me identify insects I find while working outdoors in Palm Beach County’s natural areas.
Signature: Ann Mathews

Green Lynx Spider

Green Lynx Spider

Dear Ann,
We have numerous Green Lynx Spiders in our own garden right now in Los Angeles.  We find them on basil flowers, daisies and sunflowers where they await to ambush flying insects.  Your second spider is a species of Crab Spider in the family Tomisidae, probably
Misumenops bellulus, based on this BugGuide image, also from Florida.

Crab Spider

Crab Spider

Thank you so much for the quick response. I will add the crab spider species to the Pine Glades Natural Area animal listing. We tend to overlook the smaller critters at our natural areas – so it is great when I can photograph and identify bugs and spiders not yet in our database. Keep up the wonderful work – What’s That Bug is a fantastic resource!
Ann Mathews
Palm Beach County
Department of Environmental Resources Management

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Huntsman Spider
Location: Barbados
July 1, 2015 12:01 pm
Hi,
Can you tell me if this is a Heteropoda venatoria?
I originally thought so, but certain aspects of its’ appearance don’t seem to match what would be expected for this species, having searched on the internet. It was pretty small (maybe an immature?) and was by the side of our pool in Barbados. Not the best picture in the world, but I hope you can help.
Signature: Dave

Possibly Lynx Spider

Possibly Lynx Spider

Dear Dave,
This is most definitely not a Huntsman Spider, and we believe it may be a Lynx Spider in the family
OxyopidaeBoth families are hunting spiders that do not build webs to snare prey.

Thanks Daniel,
Pretty wide of the mark, eh!
I’ve done some more research, but it seems that the eye arrangement is not typical of the family Oxyopidae (at least from what I can find, which isn’t a lot!), and the only species of the family in the West Indies would seem to be Oxypodes pallidus, about which I can find virtually nothing. It may be a case of ‘back to the drawing-board’ for me!
Thanks for your help
Dave

Hi again Dave,
We agree with you that the eye arrangement does not look like an exact match for the Lynx Spiders, but we have no other guesses at this time.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is the name of this spider?
Location: Medina, Texas
November 9, 2014 7:55 pm
Found this spider on a watermelon in our garden. Have not been able to identify it. Can you help?
Signature: Jim Callaway

Green Lynx Spider

Green Lynx Spider

Dear Jim,
The harmless Green Lynx Spider, a hunting spider that does not build a web to snare prey, is one of our favorite spiders.  Female Green Lynx Spiders, like your individual, guard their egg sacs against any perceived threat.

Thanks Daniel. Spiders are not my favorites, but this is a very pretty and unique one. I appreciate your help with the identification. You made my wife happy. She can quit looking in all her books now!
Jim

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Lynx Spider Camouflaged on peach tree bark
Location:  Mount Washington, Los Angeles, California
May 11, 2014
We haven’t had a chance to post this image after more than a week, mostly because the quality is rather bad, however, in light of a sighting in nearby Silverlake several years ago, we thought it would be nice to acknowledge that this Lynx Spider in the genus
Hamataliwa is also present in Mount Washington.  See BugGuide for additional information and for better images.

Camouflaged Spider

Camouflaged Spider

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: White Banded Fishing Spider and a Pink Green Lynx
Location: Carthage NC
March 11, 2014 10:04 am
while looking around for ways to identified this tow , I found your side ! I take photos of insect for my own intellectual enrichment . base on other search I have done I believe I identified this tow (White Banded Fishing Spider and a Pink Green Lynx) correctly but Is always great to ask to the experts :) I really appreciate your help ! Kary Clark
PS: Loving the side and all the information and interaction with others.
Signature: Kary Clark

Whitebanded Fishing Spider

White Banded Fishing Spider

Dear Kary,
You have sent us photos of two of our five favorite North American Spiders.  We think the White Banded Fishing Spiders are the most beautiful North American Spiders, and the maternal care given to the young earns them the family name Nursery Web Spiders.  The Green Lynx is one of the most amazing hunters.  They lie in wait, camouflaged on rose bushes and other green shrubbery, and then they leap upon their prey.  Green Lynx Spiders also fiercely guard their young.

Green Lynx Spider

Green Lynx Spider

Thank you for the info! it made me smile that you guys even saw this photos that quickly!

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination