Currently viewing the category: "Crevice Weaver Spider"
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Subject: What’s this spider
Location: Santa Cruz Mountains California
November 7, 2016 8:51 am
I was out I was out getting silverfish for my blue belly lizards. And underneath one of the two by fours on the deck was this pretty large spider. which I have never seen in my 50 years living here. I like spiders because they eat mosquitoes and other nasy pests. so can you help me identify it?
Signature: Fixitwill

Possibly Female Crevice Weaver Spider

Possibly Female Crevice Weaver Spider

Dear Fixitwill,
Though your image lack critical clarity, we believe this might be a female Crevice Weaver Spider in the genus
Kuculcania.  See BugGuide for some images.

Wow thank you so much for your time!! It was hard to get a good picture because it kept moving around on me.

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Subject: Spider
Location: Las Vegas, NV
January 19, 2016 7:42 pm
Just want to know what kind of spider is this and other information. It showed up at my work.
Signature: J. Bressler

Crevice Weaver Spider

Crevice Weaver Spider

Dear J. Bressler,
We believe this is a Crevice Weaver Spider in the genus
Kukulcania, and a member of the genus found further east is known as the Southern House Spider.  You can compare your image to this BugGuide image and to Southern House Spiders on Spiderz Rule.

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Subject: Recluse or Harmless?
Location: Antelope Valley, California
July 30, 2015 2:50 pm
I found this big guy in my yard, polled my friends, half say it’s a brown recluse, half say it’s harmless… One guy said “it’s just a penny”…
I live in the high desert in Southern California, it’s super dry and hot. Help me out here!
Signature: -Roni

Male Crevice Weaver Spider, we believe

Male Crevice Weaver Spider, we believe

Hi Roni,
We are going to side with the half that say it is harmless.  Brown Recluse Spiders have a violin pattern on the cephalothorax .  Male Crevice Weaver Spiders in the genus
Kukulcania, including the male Southern House Spider, Kukulcania hibernalis, are frequently mistaken for Brown Recluse Spiders.  BugGuide only lists the Southern House Spider as far west as Texas, but a relative, Kukulcania geophila, is found in California and this image from BugGuide looks very similar to your individual.  Of the entire genus Kukulcania, BugGuide notes:  “Males look very similar to the Recluse spiders, except they have much longer pedipalps, eight eyes (not six as in the Recluse family), and very long front legs.”  Finally, according to BugGuide, the Brown Recluse Spider does not get as far west as California.

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Subject: Southern House Spider
Location: Richmond, VA
February 20, 2015 12:59 am
Some time ago, I think last winter (maybe the one before), I wrote to you about a southern house spider I caught behind my couch and was going to release in the spring — you suggested I keep her, as I have tarantula experience, and I did. She’s fat and happy to this day, and she’s grown some.
This winter, I have another friend. She lives above my bed, behind an animal-skin wall hanging. I saw the web and meant to brush it away, off of my stuff (it makes all of the fur stick together and look bad), but then I saw her and realized the space was occupied. For now, and very probably permanently, she can stay, as it’s somewhere she’s safe from us accidentally hurting her, and from us being bitten on accident. I’m probably going to start feeding her periodically, so she will be more likely to stay put, instead of setting up camp somewhere less safe. I noticed her weeks ago, but I don’t see her very often. She very likely could have been living there for months. In this picture, she is out on her web “patio”, hanging out. I notice she does this at night sometimes, but usually she’s hidden all day. It’s interesting how her web is — it looks like a snowflake against the wall, and seems to exist mostly so that she can sit there with out losing footing and falling.
I’ve seen some males in my house. I think there’s a big “family” living with me.
Here’s some good pictures, if you want to put them on your website.
Best regards,
Denise Elliott

Southern House Spider

Southern House Spider

Dear Denise,
Thanks for updating us on the Southern House Spiders with which you are sharing your home .

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Subject: Hacklemesh Weaver Spider
Location: Central New York
July 7, 2014 6:53 pm
My mom found this spider in her ice cream churn that she kept in her basement and asked me to identify if it was dangerous or not. I took some pictures of it and released it into a pile of slate outside. From what I can tell, I’m pretty sure it is a female Hacklemesh Weaver Spider. Is my id of it correct and should she worry about them?
Signature: good son

What's That Spider???

What’s That Spider???

Dear good son,
Alas, we aren’t certain.  Your spider does resemble this female Hacklemesh Weaver,
Amaurobius ferox, that is posted to BugGuide, however the BugGuide individual seems to have longer and thinner legs than your individual.  Our first thought was female Southern House Spider, but BugGuide does not report them as far north as New York.  Perhaps one of our readers can assist in this identification.

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Subject: Las Vegas Black Hairy Spider
Location: Henderson NV, Las Vegas suburb
July 4, 2014 12:48 pm
I love your site. I looked at your spiders for a few days but although I found the trap door spider to be close, the rear body tank is not the same shape as my unknown spider. I never saw this 2-inch spider before. It was found on the wall of my garage, in June, 110 F weather day. I captured it, took the photo then released it in some rocks at a nearby park. You can zoom in my photo to see the eyes and hair. Thank you.
Signature: Boyd in Las Vegas

Female Southern House Spider

Female Southern House Spider

Dear Boyd,
Unfortunately, you cannot really make out the eye arrangement of this spider in your image.  This is a female Southern House Spider,
Kukulcania hibernalis, and according to BugGuide:  “Females are frequently mistaken for small tarantulas or trapdoor spiders. Males are often mistaken for recluse spiders (Loxosceles). This is a totally harmless species that builds “messy” webs emanating from crevices, often on the outside of homes.”

Thanks, Dan.     Now when I walk by the park, I will say hello to her.    I never feared her but just wanted to get her farther away from human danger.
Boyd

Hi again Boyd,
Because of your sensitivity toward the natural world, we are tagging your posting with the Bug Humanitarian Award.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination