Currently viewing the category: "Crab Spiders"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: brown recluse? crab spider? help.
Location: Atlanta GA area
December 4, 2013 8:12 pm
Hey guys. Hoping you can help me as I have 2 children in the home and hoping they arent in any danger of brown recluse spiders in my house.
Thanks yall are always amazing!!!!
Signature: Allison

Crab Spider

Crab Spider

Hi Allison,
This is most definitely NOT a Brown Recluse.  Because of the relative length of the two pairs of front legs, we agree that this is a Crab Spider in the family Thomisidae.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Unkonwn green-abdomen spider
Location: Central Russia
September 29, 2013 5:20 am
Hi! Would you be so kind to take a look and identify?
Signature: Alexander

Unknown Spider

Crab Spider

Hi Alexander,
We do not recognize this beautiful spider and we have not had any luck finding a matching image on the internet.  We can tell you that this is a male based on the developed pedipalps.  We suspect this is an Orbweaver, or perhaps a Crab Spider.  Perhaps one of our readers will be able to assist in the identification.

Unknown Spider

Crab Spider

Karl provides an identification
Hi Daniel and Alexander:
It does look like a Crab Spider (family Thomisidae), probably Ebrechtella tricuspidata. It also goes by the synonym Misumenops tricuspidata. Either way, it is the single species in the genus. It is widely distributed, eastern and southern Europe to China, but is apparently uncommon throughout its range.  Several web sites refer to it as the Triangle Crab Spider, but given its range it may have other common names as well. Regards.  Karl

Welcome back Karl, and thanks for the identification.  We were wondering if cooler weather and shorter daylight hours might be providing you with additional time to research some of our unidentified species.

Thank you very much!
You’re doing great job!
Sincerely,
Alexander Ivanov
http://ZooBot.ru

Update from Karl:  October 21, 2013
Hi Daniel. We are still pretty busy here but you are right about the cooler weather and (hopefully) more free time being on its way. Actually, the main reason you haven’t been seeing much from me recently is that we have been having huge issues with internet connectivity. We moved back to the country a few years ago and unfortunately our property is in some kind of cyber dead zone. This summer has been particularly bad, with internet connectivity and speed ranging from poor to non-existent. However, I believe we may have finally defeated all the problems and things are running rather smoothly at this time (fingers crossed). Also, you and your growing flock of helpful readers aren’t leaving many unresolved mysteries anymore. I enjoy seeing the increased interaction and participation. In my spare time I have been working steadily to identify and catalogue all the insect pictures (and spiders, etc.) that I have taken over the years but it has been a slow grind. Not being able to access the internet doesn’t help. I if I ever get caught up it will probably be years from now, but I hope to have a substantial number uploaded to my photo site over the next few months. Good luck and keep up the great work.  Karl

Hi Karl,
Your input is always greatly appreciated.  Please send us a link to your photo site when it is ready for more public consumption.

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Crab Spider in Los Angeles? BONUS QUESTION
Location: Los Angeles, CA
August 17, 2012 4:10 pm
Hey Bugman. I wanted to show you a couple pix of a crab spider I found in my yard in Los Angeles. At least, I think it’s a crab spider. Can you please confirm?
BONUS: The third (and obviously different) photo is a black orb weaver – can you confirm too?
Signature: -Amy

Crab Spider: Misumenoides formosipes

Hi Amy,
Though it is highly variable in coloration according to BugGuide, we believe we have identified your individual as a White Banded Crab Spider,
Misumenoides formosipes, based on this image on BugGuide.  According to BugGuide:  “The identifying characteristic, according to Florida’s Fabulous Spiders, is a white ridge on the spider’s face below the eyes. Can be either white or yellow. Most sources say this is a response to its surroundings, but I did find one claim that color depended on whether the egg was laid on a yellow or white-flowered plant. See here for brief description of this theory.”  The theory, according to the Spiders of Kaweah River Delta Region by Marjorie Moody is:  “According to ‘Spiderman’ Brian Carroll, this flower crab spider cannot change its color like a chameleon. He performed an experiment and disproved the myth that this spider can change to white or cream if placed on a white flower. What he did discover, however, is that if a yellow crab spider lays her eggs on a white-flowered plant, her offspring will be white, not yellow. Furthermore, if a white crab spider lays her eggs on a yellow-flowered plant her offspring will be yellow, not white. ”  Crab Spiders do not spin webs to trap prey.  They often wait on flowers and plants to ambush insects that are attracted to the plants.  Though we cannot determine the species by your photograph, the other spider does appear to be an orbweaver.

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Green Spider in Kauai
Location: Alakai Swamp (4000ft) Kauai, HI USA
March 2, 2012 6:06 pm
Found this spider in Kauai near Alakai swamp (4000ft) but can’t find this spider in the insects/spiders in north west america book i have.
body was about 2mm.
Signature: Toshiro Stang

Crab Spider

Dear Toshiro,
This is a Crab Spider in the family Tomisidae.  We are unable at this time to provide you with a species name.  Many species in the family exhibit great variability between individuals.  Your spider resembles this unidentified species we found on the Insects of Hawaii website.

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What is this?
Location: Sub-tropical rainforest area, Central Coast, Australia
December 9, 2011 10:59 pm
There’s a lot of weird bugs at my boyfriend’s house that I’ve never seen before, which is interesting because I grew up only a few kilometres away on a really similar property. Still, we saw this on the roof of my car and couldn’t figure out what on earth it is. It probably looks rather unproportionate in the picture, but each one of the long arms at the front was about 1 1/2 inches long. Not only is it creepy looking, it moves really damn quick.
Help?!
Signature: – Mel

Crab Spider

Hi Mel,
We believe this is some species of Jumping Spider in the family Salticidae.  We have not had any luck determining the species.

Possible Correction
Trevor sent in a comment that he suspects because of the paired front legs that this may be a Crab Spider.  There is a photo on the Brisbane Insect and Spider website that is called a Peak Crab Spider in the genus
Tmarus or Sidymella that looks very similar.  FlickR also has an image of Sidymella.

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Crab Spider? eating a skipper?
Location: Charleston, SC
September 19, 2011 12:15 pm
This was photographed just outside of Charleston, SC in a monastery called Mepkin Abbey. I found these two in small purple flowers growing along one of their many paths.
Signature: Steven

Crab Spider Eats Skipper

Hi Steven,
Your photo of a Crab Spider in the family Thomisidae feeding on a Skipper in the family Hesperiidae is an excellent addition to our Food Chain tag.  This is at least the fourth entry we have received documenting this particular predator/prey combination.  Crab Spiders are hunting spiders that do not spin a web, and several species are typically found hiding well camouflaged in blossoms awaiting hapless pollinating insects including Skippers.  Skippers are butterflies that are typically considered to be a transitional family between butterflies and moths, and they get their common name from their quick, darting flight.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination