Currently viewing the category: "Crab Spiders"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: green spider I.D?
Location: Haiti
August 13, 2016 9:29 pm
Hi, this green spider was seen at Thomassin (Haiti) in about 1000 m. of altitude.
I would love to know its name.
thx,
Signature: Philippe

Crab Spider

Crab Spider

Dear Philippe,
We hope you are as amused as we are that this spider you found at Thomassin, Haiti is a Crab Spider in the family Thomisidae, but alas, we have not had any luck determining the species.  Crab Spider can be identified because their front two pairs of legs are considerably longer than the remaining two pairs of legs.  Your image also nicely documents the eye arrangement pattern, which can be compared to the eye pattern of the family Thomisidae on BugGuide.

Dear Daniel,
I greatly appreciate your help. Based on the information you gave me I made a couple research on it and I tink its probably a Rejanellus pallescens.
Thank you so much,
Philippe

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Spider
Location: Hartford ky
May 13, 2016 11:11 am
Help me identify this spider
Signature: Jobeth

Crab Spider

Crab Spider

Dear Jobeth,
This is a harmless Crab Spider in the family Thomisidae, and we believe it most closely resembles one of the Bark Crab Spiders from the genus
Bassaniana pictured on BugGuide.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Green spider
Location: San Francisco Bay Area
April 16, 2016 5:32 pm
What kind of spider?
Signature: Tad

Crab Spider

Crab Spider

Dear Tad,
This is a Crab Spider in the family Thomisidae, and members of the family can be identified because the front two pairs of legs are much longer than the other two pairs.  Your individual is Diaea livens, which we identified on BugGuideBugGuide only contains reports of the species from California.  Your image represents a new species on our site.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: spider
Location: vancouver bc
April 3, 2016 7:30 pm
Help ID spider
Signature: spider

Goldenrod Crab Spider

Goldenrod Crab Spider

This is one of the most common color variations of the Goldenrod Crab Spider, Misumena vatia, a species that does not form webs to snare prey.  The Goldenrod Crab Spider or Flower Spider hunts by waiting hidden on blossoms until an insect moves close enough to be captured.  You can find additional information on BugGuide.

Goldenrod Crab Spider

Goldenrod Crab Spider

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Yellow/orange, ladybug-like spider
Location: tangkahan, north sumatra
February 20, 2016 8:58 pm
This spider was found in Tangkahan, North Sumatra, Indonesia, February 2016,, close to sea level.
Signature: matthew brealey

Crab Spider:  Platythomisus octomaculatus

Crab Spider: Platythomisus octomaculatus

Dear Matthew,
This is a Crab Spider in the family Thomisidae, identified by the length of the first two pairs of legs, and the lack of a web.  Crab Spiders do not use a web to snare prey.  We quickly found a gorgeous image on Deviant Art taken by Melvyn Yeo that is identified as an Eight Spotted Crab Spider, 
Platythomisus octomaculatus.  According to Macrophotography in Singapore:  “The Eight-Spotted Crab Spider (Platythomisus octomaculatus) has been an elusive subject to many macro photographers, appearing in the Singapore macro scene a small handful of times per year, despite being possibly the largest of all Crab Spiders (Thomisidae) in Singapore.”  According to So Much Science:  “Platythomisus octomaculatus – a rare crab spider from Borneo about 3 inches long. They sit in flowers and wait for pollinators. These guys have been known to feed on bees in captivity and Borneo has the world’s biggest and longest bees.”  Thanks for submitting this rarity to our archives.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: what is this?
Location: Johannesburg South Africa
November 21, 2015 9:26 am
Hi
Hope all is well.
I found this on my car this afternoon and would like to know what it is.
Thanks
Signature: Warren

Grass Crab Spider

Grass Crab Spider

Dear Warren,
We believe we have correctly identified your Grass Crab Spider in the genus
 Oxytate thanks to an image posted on Craniac’s Place which led us to the more reputable Biodiversity Web.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination