Currently viewing the category: "Crab Spiders"
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Subject: Green Lynx Spiders Everywhere!
Location: Palm Beach County, Florida
August 28, 2015 10:43 am
Hello What’s That Bug!
I was exploring Pine Glades Natural Area in northern Palm Beach County, Florida and came across lots of bug and spider life on the grasses and Spanish needles growing along the nature trail. I was able to sweet-talk a beautiful adult green lynx spider into letting me get close with my camera to snap a few pictures. I also came across very tiny spiders sitting on the Spanish needle flowers just waiting to pounce on any small bug that walked by. I believe these tiny spiders are baby green lynx spiders. I included a picture – please let me know if I am correct. It never ceases to amaze me that so much life can be found on one plant! Love your web site – I find myself visiting it frequently to help me identify insects I find while working outdoors in Palm Beach County’s natural areas.
Signature: Ann Mathews

Green Lynx Spider

Green Lynx Spider

Dear Ann,
We have numerous Green Lynx Spiders in our own garden right now in Los Angeles.  We find them on basil flowers, daisies and sunflowers where they await to ambush flying insects.  Your second spider is a species of Crab Spider in the family Tomisidae, probably
Misumenops bellulus, based on this BugGuide image, also from Florida.

Crab Spider

Crab Spider

Thank you so much for the quick response. I will add the crab spider species to the Pine Glades Natural Area animal listing. We tend to overlook the smaller critters at our natural areas – so it is great when I can photograph and identify bugs and spiders not yet in our database. Keep up the wonderful work – What’s That Bug is a fantastic resource!
Ann Mathews
Palm Beach County
Department of Environmental Resources Management

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: White crab spider in Ecuador
Location: Puerto Lopez, Manabi Province, Ecuador
November 27, 2014 7:26 pm
November 25, 2014, which was a clear day in the middle of several overcast days.
This seems to be a spider in the family Thomisidae but I am trying to determine which subfamily. It was on this clothes pin on our clothes line. When I took the pin off of the line, I noticed the spider and dropped it on the deck. That is where it stayed while I took the picture.
Do you know which subfamily it belongs to?
Signature: Emily in Ecuador

Crab Spider

Crab Spider

Dear Emily,
To the best of our knowledge, subfamilies in the family Thomisidae are not recognized.  Your spider resembles members of the genus
Misumena that are known as Flower Spiders and in North America.  You can read more about the genus on BugGuide.

Andrea Leonard Drummond liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination
Crab Spider

Crab Spider

Subject: Spider info needed
Location: Satara, Maharashtra, India
October 13, 2014 12:48 am
Hi,
We got this spider clicked at Satara, Maharashtra, India. Not sure what species and name of this Spider.
Size of this spider is about 6 – 8 mm.
Need details of this Spider please.
Signature: Chetan

Dear Chetan,
This is a Crab Spider in the family Thomisidae, and like your individual, many members of this family have camouflage coloration that allows them to hide in flowers where they ambush pollinating insects.  We will attempt to identify the species for you.

 

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Subject: UNUSUAL CRAB SPIDER
Location: Fannie, Arkansas
September 10, 2014 2:43 pm
I know this is a crab spider but the coloration and design are new to me. The spider is white, pink and green with a pink combed effect on the sides, pink area on the abdomen and green on the thorax top. Do you know which crab spider it is?
Signature: Bill Burton

Crab Spider catches Fly

Crab Spider catches Fly

Dear Bill,
What wonderful Food Chain images you have submitted.  We believe that based on this image from BugGuide, your individual is a Whitebanded Crab Spider,
Misumenoides formosipes, which is a highly variable species.  Browsing through the images on BugGuide, you can see just how variable the colors and markings are on the Whitebanded Crab Spider.  We have run out of time this morning, and we can’t identify the fly at this time.  Perhaps one of our readers will provide a comment.

Crab Spider eats Fly

Crab Spider eats Fly

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Any Idea?
Location: Sydney, NSW, Australia
August 2, 2014 5:13 am
Hey,
I found this 2cm big guy near a salt water river in Sydney, Australia. I have no clue if its a spider/scorpion thing or just a bug or whatever. I am not even sure if there a 4, 6 or 8 legs …
I googled a lot but cant find anything helpful…
(sorry for my english 😉 )
Signature: Ben

Crab Spider:  Sidymella species

Crab Spider: Sidymella species

Dear Ben,
Your English is perfectly fine.  Your confusion is well founded.  Both Spiders and Scorpions are classified in the zoological class Arachnida, the Arachnids, so they share many physical similarities.  Insects and Arachnids, including Spider and Scorpions, are classified together in the phylum Arthropoda, and again, they all share certain physical characteristics.  With that stated, this is a Spider in the order Araneae, and Spiders are identified because they have two body parts, the cephalothorax (combined head and thorax) and abdomen, and eight legs.  This particular Spider is holding its two front pairs of legs together, which makes it a bit difficult to count.  The two front pairs of legs are considerably longer than the rear two pairs, and this is a physical trait shared by Crab Spiders in the family Thomisidae.  Once we got to that level of identification, we turned to one of our favorite sites for identifying Australian Arthropods, the Brisbane Insects and Spiders, where we found a very similar looking Crab Spider identified as being in one of two genera:
Tmarus or Sidymella.  The site author coined the name Peak Crab Spider ” because its abdomen rises to a dorsal peak.  Its two front pairs of legs are much longer than the hind two pairs.”  Scroll to the bottom of the page to see the Peak Crab Spider.  Armed with that information, we found other representatives in the genus pictured on Spiders of Australia, and the closest matches are not yet fully identified, and are given the names Sidymella ZZ477 and Sidymella ZZ592.  Those letter and number identifyers indicate that the Spiders have yet to be described in a published paper at which time they can be given species names by the describer.  This is a very exciting posting for us and we are featuring it in our scrolling featured posting bar.

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Subject: A yellow spider on Marin County’s Mount Tamalpais
Location: Mount Tamalpais, near Mill Valley, CA, USA
March 10, 2014 8:03 pm
I saw several of these small yellow spiders on leaves of Arctostaphylos glandulosa near the top of Marin’s Mount Tamalpais. Any idea?
Signature: S. R. Gilbert

Crab Spider

Crab Spider

Dear S.R. Gilbert,
This is a Crab Spider in the family Thomisidae.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination