Currently viewing the category: "Spiders"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Southern House Spider
Location: Richmond, VA
February 20, 2015 12:59 am
Some time ago, I think last winter (maybe the one before), I wrote to you about a southern house spider I caught behind my couch and was going to release in the spring — you suggested I keep her, as I have tarantula experience, and I did. She’s fat and happy to this day, and she’s grown some.
This winter, I have another friend. She lives above my bed, behind an animal-skin wall hanging. I saw the web and meant to brush it away, off of my stuff (it makes all of the fur stick together and look bad), but then I saw her and realized the space was occupied. For now, and very probably permanently, she can stay, as it’s somewhere she’s safe from us accidentally hurting her, and from us being bitten on accident. I’m probably going to start feeding her periodically, so she will be more likely to stay put, instead of setting up camp somewhere less safe. I noticed her weeks ago, but I don’t see her very often. She very likely could have been living there for months. In this picture, she is out on her web “patio”, hanging out. I notice she does this at night sometimes, but usually she’s hidden all day. It’s interesting how her web is — it looks like a snowflake against the wall, and seems to exist mostly so that she can sit there with out losing footing and falling.
I’ve seen some males in my house. I think there’s a big “family” living with me.
Here’s some good pictures, if you want to put them on your website.
Best regards,
Denise Elliott

Southern House Spider

Southern House Spider

Dear Denise,
Thanks for updating us on the Southern House Spiders with which you are sharing your home .

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: what is this spider?
Location: Los Angeles, California
February 12, 2015 3:20 pm
I discovered this spider on my stairs inside my house. I saved it and got it in a container and took it
outside. It jumps. The size of a finger nail.
Signature: Shannon

Jumping Spider

Jumping Spider

Dear Shannon,
This is some species of Jumping Spider in the genus
Phidippus, possibly Phidippus adumbratus.  Because of your kindness in rescuing this lovely Jumping Spider, we are tagging this submission with the Bug Humanitarian Award.

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Subject: What Spider Is This
Location: South Africa
February 5, 2015 2:05 am
Hi There,
Hoping you are able to identify this spider? – Wanted to know it it is poisonous to humans as some one at work got bitten by it?
Signature: Spider

Possibly Immature Widow Spider

Possibly Immature Widow Spider

Dear Spider,
This looks to us like an immature Widow Spider in the genus
Latrodectus.  You can compare your individual to this image posted to iSpot.  Some species of Widow Spiders are considered venomous and potentially dangerous to humans who are bitten.

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Spider in Flores, Indonesia
Location: Labuanbajo, Flores, Indonesia
February 4, 2015 6:24 am
Found this spider in my house. Very fast and about 7 centimeter diameter (including legs). Do you know what it is?
Signature: Chris

Huntsman Spider

Huntsman Spider

Hi Chris,
This is a Huntsman Spider or Giant Crab Spider,
Heteropoda venatoria, and it is considered harmless to humans.  This species is also called a Banana Spider because they were often imported with bunches of banana and they have become established in warm coastal cities throughout the world because of global shipments of bananas.  Huntsman Spiders do not build a web, but they hunt their prey, often Cockroaches, at night, so they can be considered beneficial.

Wow super quick. Thanks a ton!
Thanks,
Chris

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Subject: Large spider from Ecuador
Location: Vilcabamba, Ecuador
February 1, 2015 3:28 pm
Hey I recently found this spider hiding in my towel! Have tried looking at different possibilities but none seem to fit the bill. It was found in September, in Vilcabamba , Ecuador. Someone suggested it was called Jamaco by the natives here, a type of bird-prey spider, but im not convinced. Any help would be greatly appreciated to satisfy my curiosity of who this visitor was!
Signature: Etienne

Tarantula

Tarantula

Dear Etienne,
This is some species of Tarantula, but we are not certain of the species.  The Spinnerets on the tip of the abdomen are especially pronounced in your individual.  According to Tarántulas de México:  “Spinnerets are movable structures located in the rear of the opisthosoma, and are in charge of expelling and placing the silk web produced by four internal glands. As the silk passes through the ducts and reaches the spinnerets, its molecular structure changes and becomes very resistant. It comes out through small tubes located by the hundreds in the lower part of the spinnerets; then the silk dries, and reaches the consistency we all know.  Tarantulas have four spinnerets: The two lower ones are small, and the higher ones are larger and very mobile.”  We did locate a similar looking Ecuadorean Tarantula on Susan Swensen Witherup’s Ithaca College profile.  Maria Sibylla Merian’s 17th Century illustration of a Bird Eating Tarantula was a hotly debated issue in her time and that illustration caused her to fall out of favor among naturalists because of questions of its authenticity.  According to Tarantulas of Ecuador:  “
Theraphosa Blondi
The largest species of tarantula is also called the goliath bird-eating spider, and its leg span can reach up to 12 inches. They are burrowers and spend the majority of their lives inside their homes, never moving more than a few feet away even while hunting. They prefer swampy areas near water, where their brown bodies will blend into the surroundings. Considered extremely aggressive, these spiders do not make good pets, and are prone to biting — their 1-inch fangs can do a great deal of damage, although the venom is not fatal to humans. The typical diet of this spider includes amphibians, rodents, insects, snakes and the occasional small bird.”  It is pictured on Wonderful Insects by Frank Fieldler, and it does not resemble your Tarantula.  Perhaps one of our readers can provide information on the identity of your Tarantula.

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Subject: Spider ID please
Location: Scottburgh, KZN, South Africa
January 30, 2015 10:25 pm
Hi there, could you please help identify this spider, found in Scottburgh, kzn, South Africa.
Many thanks
Signature: Angie

Wolf Spider

Wolf Spider

Dear Angie,
Based on the eye arrangement pictured on BugGuide, we are confident that this is a Wolf Spider in the family Lycosidae.
  There are some excellent Wolf Spider images on iSpot.  A large Wolf Spider might bite a human if it is carelessly handled, but Wolf Spiders are not considered dangerous.

Hi Daniel
Thanks so much for the ID of the little wolf spider.
Appreciate the speedy answer :-)
Best regards
Angie

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination