Currently viewing the category: "Spiders"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Interesting Kenyan Spider
Location: Kenya
September 17, 2014 10:25 am
What kind of spider is this? We live in Machakos, Kenya. He looks to be half crab.
Signature: Marc Jordan

Crablike Spiny Orbweaver

Crablike Spiny Orbweaver

Dear Marc Jordan,
This appears to be an Orbweaver in the genus
Gasteracantha, and North American members of the genus are known as Crablike Spiny Orbweavers.  We located a very similar looking individual from Tanzania on FlickR, but it is only identified to the genus level and another image on FlickR is identified as possibly Gasteracantha versicolor.  According to the images on Encyclopedia of Life, it is a highly variable species.  Thorn Spider appears to be an accepted common name.

Crablike Spiny Orbweaver

Crablike Spiny Orbweaver

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Unknown Unusual Spider
Location: Stoughton, WI
September 14, 2014 7:51 pm
We’ve got them too!
We have an 103 year old four square and found them in the basement cellar under the porch. We never go there, but we went down there when we found a chipmunk coming in and out from our porch foundation. We went down to flush the chipmunk out and fill in the hole when we discovered these fascinating creatures … albeit creepy!
We live just south of Madison, WI
We had never seen them before.
We have the same questions as everyone else.
Why is this fungus suddenly appearing?
And, is it harmful to humans?
Signature: Mariah

Fungus Riddled Spider

Fungus Riddled Spider

Dear Mariah,
These are probably the best images we have received of Cellar Spiders infested with a deadly fungus.

Seemingly contagious Spider Fungus

Seemingly contagious Spider Fungus

Fungus Infested Spider
Fungus Infested Spider

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Unusual Black Spider
Location: Vancouver Island, British Columbia
September 13, 2014 11:43 am
Hello Bugman! I was walking down the street and I saw this guy puttering along the sidewalk out of the corner of my eye. At first I thought it was a large black beetle but upon closer inspection it turned out to be a rather large and unusual spider. I’ve lived on Vancouver Island my whole life and have come across a lot of our native spiders which have all looked pretty similar, but this one looks nothing like anything I’ve ever seen in the wild! He/she was quite meaty looking and fairly large. Any ideas about what spider this is and where he/she could have come from?
Signature: Britt

Folding Door Spider

Folding Door Spider

Dear Britt,
We are confident that your Trapdoor Spider is a native male Folding Door Spider in the genus
Antrodiaetus thanks to this comparable image posted to Bugguide.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Whats that bug! Spider!
Location: Las Vegas, Nevada
September 13, 2014 6:22 pm
I found the super cool spider that I have never seen before in Southern Nevada! Could you help me identify it?
Signature: Thanks bunches! Victoria Rebholz

Immature Western Black Widow

Immature Western Black Widow

Hi Victoria,
This is an immature Western Black Widow,
Latrodectus hesperus, and you can compare your image to this image posted to BugGuide.  According to BugGuide:  “Caution: Anyone bitten by a western black widow spider should receive prompt and proper medical treatment. While the black widow is considered the most venomous spider in North America, death from a black widow spider bite is highly unlikely.  For the most part, the black widow’s bite may be felt only as a pin prick, during which the spider’s fangs inject a minute amount of highly toxic venom under the skin. The severity of the victim’s reaction depends on his or her age and health, and on the area of the body that is bitten. Local swelling and redness at the site may be followed in one to three hours by intense spasmodic pain, which can travel throughout the affected limbs and body, settling in the abdomen and back (intense abdominal cramping, described as similar to appendicitis), and can last 48 hours or longer. Elderly patients or young children run a higher risk of severe reactions, but it is rare for bites to result in death; only sixty-three having been reported in the United States between 1950 and 1959 (Miller, 1992). Other symptoms can include nausea and profuse perspiration. If left untreated, tremors, convulsions and unconsciousness may result. When death does occur, it is due to suffocation.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Big Spider Bear Lake Idaho
Location: Fish Haven, Idaho
September 13, 2014 9:47 pm
Saw this big spider on our walk today near Bear Lake on the Idaho side. It was sitting (standing?) in the road. It is mid-September, leaves are changing, and has been a wet fall. Is it venomous? Dangerous? Tried to talk my friend into putting her hand down beside it for a size reference but she refused…something about being afraid of spiders. It was bigger than a silver dollar but smaller than the toy poodle walking with us.
Signature: Thanks

Trapdoor Spider

Trapdoor Spider

We believe this is a Trapdoor Spider, but we have not had any luck identifying it on BugGuide.  We hope one of our readers will provide us with something more specific.  Large Trapdoor Spiders might bite if carelessly handled, but they are not considered dangerous to humans.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: UNUSUAL CRAB SPIDER
Location: Fannie, Arkansas
September 10, 2014 2:43 pm
I know this is a crab spider but the coloration and design are new to me. The spider is white, pink and green with a pink combed effect on the sides, pink area on the abdomen and green on the thorax top. Do you know which crab spider it is?
Signature: Bill Burton

Crab Spider catches Fly

Crab Spider catches Fly

Dear Bill,
What wonderful Food Chain images you have submitted.  We believe that based on this image from BugGuide, your individual is a Whitebanded Crab Spider,
Misumenoides formosipes, which is a highly variable species.  Browsing through the images on BugGuide, you can see just how variable the colors and markings are on the Whitebanded Crab Spider.  We have run out of time this morning, and we can’t identify the fly at this time.  Perhaps one of our readers will provide a comment.

Crab Spider eats Fly

Crab Spider eats Fly

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination