Currently viewing the category: "Spiders"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Spider is checking me out!
Location: Mount Lowe/Angeles National Forest, California
June 26, 2016 1:43 am
Dear Bugman,
I see these tunnel shaped webs all over Angeles Forest. I found this one at the tope of Mount Lowe, near Mount Wilson. When I began to edit the photos, I was surprised to see the spider made his way to the opening of his little cave, his many eyeballs staring right into my camera lens! Is he a trap door spider of some sort?
Signature: Jessica Chortkoff

Funnel Web Spider

Funnel Web Spider

Hi again Jessica,
This is NOT a Trapdoor Spider.  It sure looks to us like a Funnel Web Spider in the family Agelenidae.  According to BugGuide:  “For this family of spiders, the web is a horizontal, sheet-like web with a small funnel-like tube off to a side (or for some species, the middle of the web). This funnel is what the family is named for, and is used by the spider for hunting and protection. The spider will lay in wait in the funnel, and when an insect flies into, or lands on the web, the spider will rush out, very quickly check to see if it is prey, and if it is prey, bite it. The venom is fast-acting on the prey, so once the prey is subdued (within a second or two), the spider will drag the prey back into the funnel (for safety while eating, and to prevent other insects from recognizing the danger that lurks on the web…).”  Eye arrangement is one of the methods that one can distinguish the correct family for taxonomic classification, and upon enlarging your image, the eye arrangement on your individual appears to match the eye arrangement for the family of Funnel Web Spiders.  BugGuide also indicates:  “Like most spiders, funnel weavers are nocturnal. They are often seen when the lights are turned on, or at least the ambient lighting changes enough that the spider feels it must run for cover. There are approximately 1,200 species of funnel weaver world-wide, and a little over 100 of them are found in North America ((1)(accessed October 2012). Sometimes, if you slowly approach the web, and look around the funnel or down into the funnel, you might see the spider. (Sudden movements or changes in light (like your shadow) will cause the spider to retreat deep into the funnel so you most likely will be unable to see it).”

Funnel Web Weaver

Funnel Web Weaver

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Red legged purse web spider
Location: Washington, MO
June 23, 2016 12:10 pm
Found this beauty in a trash can a woodland critter had knocked over. He is in Washington, MO.
Signature: Bob the Farrier

Red Legged Purseweb Spider

Red Legged Purseweb Spider

Hi Bob the Farrier,
It always cheers us so to post new images of Red Legged Purseweb Spiders.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What type of spider is this
Location: Upstate, NY
June 20, 2016 5:48 am
This was found near friends house in Binghamton, NY. Could you please tell me what type of spider it us and if it is poisonous? Could you tell me a little about the spider?
Signature: Marcus

Fishing Spider

Fishing Spider

Dear Marcus,
This is a Fishing Spider in the genus
Dolomedes, and they are generally found not far from water.  They are also called Dock Spiders.  Fishing Spiders are not aggressive and they are not considered dangerous to humans.  Female Fishing Spiders exhibit strong maternal behavior.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

!Subject:  Red Legged Purseweb Spider
Location:  Great Falls Park, Virginia
June 19, 2016 11:50 AM
Thank you for the ID! I just photographed a Red Legged Purseweb Spider today at Great Falls Park, Virginia – since it’s endangered and rare, I thought you would like to know of the sighting. Not a great photo, as it was moving fairly fast from the path to the greater safety of the grass.
Signature: Seth

Red Legged Purseweb Spider

Red Legged Purseweb Spider

Dear Seth,
We are not certain what flaws you observe in your awesome image of an endangered Red Legged Purseweb Spider, but it is the best image we have received of the species since the first submission we received 13 years ago and featured in a posting entitled Help! I’m Having Nightmares!

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Is this a ladybird spider?
Location: Mytilene, Greece
June 9, 2016 2:45 pm
Hello I am in Mytilene, Greece, where I found this beautiful spider and tried to take a picture but was too fast for a good shot. I would like to learn if it is poisonous
Goog job
Signature: Eri

Ladybird Spider

Ladybird Spider

Dear Eri,
This is indeed a male Ladybird Spider and they are not considered dangerous to humans.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Spiderlings…hatching? Or a communal web???
Location: Montrose, CO
June 16, 2016 10:58 pm
Dear Bugman,
I’m a longtime fan of the site, though I haven’t had much cause to send any id requests in between your wonderful archives and my trusty field guide. But this one was both interesting and perplexing: while visiting family in western Colorado, I walked out the front door and spotted what looked like a lot of large grains of sand caught on a small three-dimensional web spreading from the front step to the post of the railing (perhaps 10 cm long and the same height). When I looked closer, I saw that the “grains” were hundreds of little yellow balls about 1-2 mm in diameter, stuck all over the cobweb structure, with here and there a few very tiny yellow spiders moving around. In the 30 seconds it took to get my camera, ALL of the “grains” had turned to the same spiders–hundreds of them!
The only explanation I can think of is that the balls were eggs and the spiders were hatching from them en masse (though they had all hatched by the time I got the camera), but I’ve never heard of a spider laying eggs all over a web like that rather than making an egg sac. Any ideas?
Signature: Susan

Orbweaver Hatchlings

Orbweaver Hatchlings

Dear Susan,
We believe these are hatchling Orbweaver Spiderlings, and that they have just emerged from a traditional egg sac like you have described.  Even immediately upon hatching, Spiderlings are able to spin silk, so what you witnessed can be described as a communal web, though not a web in the traditional sense.  Orbweavers disperse using a technique known as Ballooning.  The spiderling releases a strand of silk that catches the wind and transports the individual to a new location far from its siblings that would compete for food as well as pose the potential threat of cannibalism.  We believe the Spiderlings in your image are just waiting to catch the breeze.

Orbweaver Hatchlings

Orbweaver Hatchlings

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination