Currently viewing the category: "Spiders"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Tarantula Spider ?
Location: Orange, CA
July 23, 2016 8:52 am
This spider was found around 10:30pm. It was over 100 F here during the day so I am not sure if the heat confused it? It was found On a driveway near a garden. The legs seem more slender than other pictures of tarantulas I have seen. If you look closely you can notice darker black banding on its legs. Just wondering what it’s species is?
Signature: Courtney

Tarantula

Tarantula

Dear Courtney,
This is most definitely a Tarantula.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Massachusetts Trapdoor Spider?
Location: South Central Massachusetts
July 10, 2016 11:00 am
I would be most appreciative if you could identify the spider I found last week walking on my garage floor. I have never seen this particular spider before. Could it be a northeast trapdoor spider? I let him go without harm, I love spiders.
Signature: Thank you!

Trapdoor Spider

Black Purseweb Spider

Though this might be a Trapdoor Spider in the genus Ummidia, based on images posted to BugGuide,  the genus seems to be primarily a southern genus with sightings as far north as Maryland on BugGuide.  We believe a much closer match is a Purseweb Spider in the family Atypidae, like this individual posted to BugGuide.  The Black Purseweb Spider, Sphodros niger, pictured on BugGuide looks like a perfect match to us and you are well within the documented range of the species according to BugGuide.  The spinnerets, the silk producing organs at the tip of the abdomen, are quite distinctive, as are the impressive chelicerae.  You may enjoy the information provided in the Angelfire pdf.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What type of tarantula could this be ?
Location: Bought it in Australia but could be from another country.
July 6, 2016 10:33 am
I know it’s a tarantula but just wondering if you could give me an idea on what type! I bought it from a pet store and forgotten what it’s called !!!
Signature: Adrian

Tarantula, we presume

Tarantula, we presume

Dear Adrian,
With all due respect, accuracy in proper identifications is tremendously aided by knowing the location of the sighting.  Pet stores purchase creatures from all over the world.  Furthermore, the highest quality images are incredibly helpful for proper identifications.  Your dark, blurry, low resolution image is not ideal for a proper identification.  We are not able to assist you at this time.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: spider
Location: kalloni – lesvos-greece (north aegean)
July 3, 2016 6:18 am
hi its about a spider i found here some details
place: kalloni – lesvos- greece in a church (was climbing the wall)
june-2016
size fits in grown mans palm
thanks
Signature: spider

Huntsman Spider: Eusparassus walckenaeri

Huntsman Spider: Eusparassus walckenaeri

Because the second set of legs is longer than the first set of legs, we suspect this is a Huntsman Spider or Giant Crab Spider in the family Sparassidae which is profiled on the Australian Museum site. We searched for images from Lesvos and discovered this Alamy posting identified as Eusparassus walckenaeri.  We verified that identification on Araneae Spiders of Europe.  On The Natural History Museum of Crete site, it states:  “This is a common spider of the Eastern Mediterranean. It is characterized by its large body size (5 cm) that looks even larger because of the long legs always laterally extended, and by an iridescent light which may be observed on its outer surface. It can be found in open ground as well as inside houses where it eats small and large insects, especially cockroaches.”  There are also several images of Eusparassus walckenaeri from Lesbos on FocusNatura. Your image is positively gorgeous.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Silver hipster spider w/ arrow-like pattern
Location: Woodstock, GA
July 2, 2016 9:12 am
Hi WTB, I have looked through your site for this hipster spider, and can’t find it. I have found several of these all around our backyard, near our garden, on the side of our house… It’s super shiny silver w/ 2 tiny goldfish stripes going along the hipster black “arrow” like pattern down its back. Black legs. They are small (see next to dime)… Any idea what it is?
Signature: Kim in GA

Orchard Spider

Orchard Spider

Dear Kim,
You can verify the identity of this Orchard Spider,
Leucauge venusta, by comparing the “hipster black ‘arrow'” pattern to this close-up image on BugGuide.  It is described on BugGuide as having:  “Slightly elongated abdomen marked with silver, yellow, black, green, and bright orange or pink spots. Spins its web at an angle and hangs in the center.  Cephalothorax yellowish green, striped with brown along sides. Abdomen silvery above with dark stripes; sides yellow with red spot near tip, and red spot underneath.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Spider is checking me out!
Location: Mount Lowe/Angeles National Forest, California
June 26, 2016 1:43 am
Dear Bugman,
I see these tunnel shaped webs all over Angeles Forest. I found this one at the tope of Mount Lowe, near Mount Wilson. When I began to edit the photos, I was surprised to see the spider made his way to the opening of his little cave, his many eyeballs staring right into my camera lens! Is he a trap door spider of some sort?
Signature: Jessica Chortkoff

Funnel Web Spider

Funnel Web Spider

Hi again Jessica,
This is NOT a Trapdoor Spider.  It sure looks to us like a Funnel Web Spider in the family Agelenidae.  According to BugGuide:  “For this family of spiders, the web is a horizontal, sheet-like web with a small funnel-like tube off to a side (or for some species, the middle of the web). This funnel is what the family is named for, and is used by the spider for hunting and protection. The spider will lay in wait in the funnel, and when an insect flies into, or lands on the web, the spider will rush out, very quickly check to see if it is prey, and if it is prey, bite it. The venom is fast-acting on the prey, so once the prey is subdued (within a second or two), the spider will drag the prey back into the funnel (for safety while eating, and to prevent other insects from recognizing the danger that lurks on the web…).”  Eye arrangement is one of the methods that one can distinguish the correct family for taxonomic classification, and upon enlarging your image, the eye arrangement on your individual appears to match the eye arrangement for the family of Funnel Web Spiders.  BugGuide also indicates:  “Like most spiders, funnel weavers are nocturnal. They are often seen when the lights are turned on, or at least the ambient lighting changes enough that the spider feels it must run for cover. There are approximately 1,200 species of funnel weaver world-wide, and a little over 100 of them are found in North America ((1)(accessed October 2012). Sometimes, if you slowly approach the web, and look around the funnel or down into the funnel, you might see the spider. (Sudden movements or changes in light (like your shadow) will cause the spider to retreat deep into the funnel so you most likely will be unable to see it).”

Funnel Web Weaver

Funnel Web Weaver

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination