Currently viewing the category: "Spiders"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Funky disco boots Spider Karijini
Location: Karijini, North West Western Australia
December 6, 2016 6:08 am
Hello,
Camping one night in the out back in WA we pitched up next to a cool spider. this guy lived in a hole about 20mm diameter. When he plucked up the courage he sat out, on top of his hole guarding it like a bouncer at flares, he was out in the evening and had a really vibrant party suit on. white and orange legs and a snow white body.
Any ideas?
curious to find out and haven’t seen anything similar before nor after.
Signature: Tim

Wolf Spider

Desert Wolf Spider

Dear Tim,
We have one previous submission in our archives of a Desert Wolf Spider,
Hoggicosa bicolor, from Western Australia, but that individual is much more yellow than your individual.  There is also an excellent image on FlickR where it states:  “Hoggicosa bicolor is arguably one of the most spectacular wolf spiders in Australia. It is fairly common in the arid zone and can be found in WA, NT, SA, Qld and western NSW. This photograph shows a penultimate male, and as all other Hoggicosa, the male will turn drab with the final moult (see the other photo of a male H. bicolor in this set).”

Thanks Daniel,
Really interested to find out.
Tim Barlow

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Spider
Location: Del Mar, CA, 1/2 mile from ocean
December 4, 2016 11:59 pm
We’ve seen this spider in our front yard in the same place for about three months. It seems to have a yellow outline of an hourglass on its belly. We’d like to know what kind of spider it is and if it’s poisonous.
Signature: Matthew Lee

Silver Garden Orbweaver

Silver Garden Orbweaver

Dear Matthew,
This beautiful Silver Garden Orbweaver,
Argiope argentata, is considered harmless, though large individuals might bite if carelessly handled.  Most spiders are venomous, though very few have a venom powerful enough to threaten humans.

Silver Garden Orbweaver

Silver Garden Orbweaver

Thanks very much!  I’m glad it’s considered harmless.  We will leave it alone then.
–Matt

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Australian wasp
Location: Hornsby NSW
December 3, 2016 1:03 am
My wife captured this shot in our front garden. I wonder if the wasp removed the huntsman spiders legs for transport purposes?
Signature: Australian wasp

Spider Wasp and Huntsman Prey

Spider Wasp and Huntsman Prey

We get several very dramatic submissions from Australia each year of Spider Wasps in the family Pompilidae with Huntsman Spider prey.  The female Spider Wasps stings and paralyzes the Huntsman Spider and then drags it back to her burrow where she lays an egg on the paralyzed Spider.  When the egg hatches, the wasp larva feeds on the living but paralyzed Spider.  It appears that your Spider Wasp has removed the legs of the Huntsman Spider by biting them off in order to make transportation easier.  Based on images posted to the Brisbane Insect site, we believe your Spider Wasp is in the genus Fabriogenia.

Spider Wasp and Huntsman Prey

Spider Wasp and Huntsman Prey

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Spider in Ontario Canada
Location: Goderich Ontario
November 18, 2016 5:33 pm
Found this spider on the wall outside work today. Was pretty docile, and no web in sight, but quite pretty! Got several pictures from different angles, so I’m really hoping they’re good enough. I included one zoomed out photo to try and indicate scale. I’m thinking he must’ve been in one of the shipments we got this week since we’re setting up a new store, but either way he was an awesome spider to see!
Signature: Laurie

Banded Garden Orbweaver

Banded Garden Orbweaver

Dear Laurie,
This is a Banded Garden Orbweaver or Banded Argiope,
Argiope trifasciata, and it is a local species for you as it ranges over most of North America.  Orbweavers mature in a single season, hatching in the spring and growing through the summer, attaining maturity and full size in the fall when they generally attract all the attention.  Like other members of the family, this Banded Garden Orbweaver spends most of its time in its web, unless the web is destroyed or it is pursued by a predator.  Orbweavers are perfectly harmless, though a large individual is capable of biting.  The venom should have little more effect than local swelling and tenderness.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Spider identification
Location: Northern California
November 12, 2016 11:30 pm
Found this decently large spider on my porch here in the rural mountains of northern California, Sierra Nevada foothills. The picture is a close up but it’s about half the size of my palm including legs. Any ideas of what kind of spider it is?
Signature: Christina

Trapdoor Spider

Trapdoor Spider

Dear Christina,
This is a Trapdoor Spider.  It resembles this individual from the genus
Calisoga that is pictured on BugGuide.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What kind of spider is this??
Location: St. Catharines, Ontario
November 8, 2016 8:37 am
Hi there,
I’m hoping you help me out by telling me what kind of spider I found at my house.
Signature: Doesn’t matter

Shamrock Spider

Shamrock Spider

This is a harmless female Orbweaver, and though we sometimes have problems with species identifications in the family, we are confident this is a Shamrock Spider, Araneus trifolium, a species found throughout the northern regions of North America.  Here is a matching BugGuide image, also from Ontario.  According to BugGuide:  “Araneus trifolium female occurs in a variety of colors.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination