Currently viewing the category: "Spiders"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Unknown Spider
Location: Auckland, New Zealand
January 18, 2015 3:47 pm
Hi there!
Recently found this little interesting spider in our bathroom down in New Zealand, just thought we’d post it up here for a bit of insight as none of us have a clue
Cheers’
Liam
Signature: Cheers’ Liam O’Connor

Possibly Orbweaver

Possibly Orbweaver

Dear Liam,
We believe this is an Orbweaver in the family Araneidae, and it has a very distinct, pointed abdomen.  The pointy abdomen should make it easy to identify, but we could not find any matching images in our initial search.  There is a genus in Australia on the Brisbane Insect site with a species known as the Scorpion Tailed Spider, but it has much shorter legs than your individual.

Possibly Orbweaver

Possibly Orbweaver

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: unknown spider
Location: Upper-Coomera Gold Coast 4209, Queensland
January 3, 2015 4:02 pm
This bug only comes out at night to the same place, makes its Web between the garden and rail by the pool, in the morning the spider and Web are gone.
It has a bright orange/red back and it seems like it’s like a shell (not sure).
Please help us find out what it is..
Thanks
Signature: Ellen

Orbweaver

Orbweaver

Dear Ellen,
This is a harmless Orbweaver is also called a Garden Spider, and we believe it is in the genus
Eriophora based on images posted to the Brisbane Insect Website.  This appears to be a genus with some variability in coloration and markings within the species.  We believe your species is Eriophora biapicata and there is a nice image posted to FlickR.  We are postdating your submission to go live next week while we are out of the office.

Lori Ledeboer, Andrea Leonard Drummond, Amy Gosch, Kathleen Travis Perin liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bolsa spidea eggs?
Location: Anaheim, CA
January 1, 2015 4:36 pm
Howdy, these were found in a heap between avocado leaves. Can you ID? They’re about 1cm diameter, about 10 of them, tangled in sticky web, hard shell.
Signature: Becky G

Bolas Spider Egg Sacs

Bolas Spider Egg Sacs

Happy New Year Becky G,
We agree with you that these are Bolas Spider Egg Sacs, not those of a Bolsa Spidea.  Bolas Spiders are very well camouflaged and are difficult to find.  The egg sacs we reported on in November appear to have been parasitized, but we have hopes that a few individuals will hatch to perpetuate the species in our garden.

Christy Harris liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Spider Zoropsis spinimana
Location: Oakland, California, USA
December 22, 2014 6:01 pm
I found this fellow (and I do believe it is a male) lurking on my living room wall in Oakland, California. At just over 2″ he’s too big to live with comfortably. So, into a capture jar, smile for a close up and then away to the garden with you.
I was able to get a few good photos and with a quick internet search had the spider ID. Seems that Zoropsis spinimana is an exotic introduction to Northern California and is native to the Mediterranean. Our local nature authority, the California Academy of Sciences of San Francisco, has been tracking its spread since it was first found in the San Jose area in the mid-1990’s.
It’s not aggressive, slow moving and not believed to be harmful. Likes crawlspaces, attics and houses.
I’ve written to you to help out others like myself who are curious about these critters.
Signature: JP

False Wolf Spider:  Zoropsis spinimana

False Wolf Spider: Zoropsis spinimana

Dear JP,
Thanks so much for your well researched submission and the helpful information you have provided for our readership.  As you have indicated, BugGuide states:  “Native to the Mediterranean coastal countries and northern Africa” and BugGuide also reports:  “This is the only species in the family found in BugGuide’s range.”  According to the UC Davis website:  “In the mid-1990s,
Zoropsis spinimana, a large spider from the Mediterranean region, started showing up in homes around the San Francisco Bay area. It has since become well established around the southern, eastern, and northern portions of the Bay and has become a permanent member of the California spider population. Although the known distribution is not very extensive, this spider does inhabit a part of the state that is densely populated by humans and Zoropsis is routinely found in homes, causing concern among the people who encounter it. However, it is harmless to people. This Pest Note was prepared to provide information regarding this non-native resident.  The first California reports of Zoropsis spinimana were from the Sunnyvale area in Santa Clara County in 1992. Since then the spider has mostly spread north and east around the San Francisco Bay area with specimens found throughout Santa Clara, San Mateo, Alameda, Marin, and Santa Cruz Counties. Scientists at the California Academy of Sciences in San Francisco are tracking the spider’s spread. So far, Zoropsis spinimana seems to be found only in and around human dwellings. However, it is also possible that this spider is establishing itself in natural vegetation areas.”

Sue Dougherty, Jessica M. Schemm liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Blue planar spidernet chile
Location: Osorno, Chile
December 18, 2014 2:30 am
Hallo bugman,
can you identify the spider which produced this
horizontally spanned blue chaotic net near the Osorno in Chile in December?
Unfortunately, the spider was absent.
Greetings
Signature: Joachim

Unknown Spider Web

Unknown Spider Web

Dear Joachim,
Thanks so much for sending a higher resolution image.  We have not been able to determine the identity of the spider that created this web, but we are posting the image and many times our readers write in to contribute to the identification process.  Hopefully we will be able to provide you with an identification in the future.
  Can you provide us with any additional information.  Was it near a body of water.  We seem to have a recollection of horizontal webs near streams, but we are still attempting to locate those sources.

Sue Dougherty, Kathleen Travis Perin, Vanessa Simone liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Spider
Location: Santa Clarita, CA
December 18, 2014 8:51 am
found this spider climbing up my patio. Wondering what it is
Signature: Thank you

Male California Trapdoor Spider

Male California Trapdoor Spider

This gorgeous creature is a male California Trapdoor Spider, and we frequently receive sightings and submissions after the first heavy rains of the season when the males leave their burrows and seek mates.

Kathleen Travis Perin, Southern California Wildlife, Hema Shah liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination