Currently viewing the category: "Spiders"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: My Company’s New Pet
Location: New Jersey
May 24, 2016 7:23 am
Hi Mr. Bugman!
So, We happened upon this little guy/girl at our office in New Jersey, just sitting there on the floor. I was able to be right next to it without it scurrying about, even let me catch it in a cup to let it out outside. Any ideas what it is? It was fairly big compared to most spiders I’m used to seeing around the house or office. I didn’t think to take a picture of it next to anything to compare its size at the time but I know with its legs it was just small enough to fit inside the cup I used. (Picture of cup attached too lol)
Signature: Stef

Male Fishing Spider

Male Fishing Spider

Dear Stef,
Based on the size of his pedipalps, we believe this Fishing Spider in the genus
Dolomedes is a male, and that he is most likely a Northern Fishing SpiderDolomedes tenebrosus, a species generally found near water.  According to BugGuide:  “A study by Schwartz, Wagner & Hebets, August 2013, has found that during mating the male of this species dies.”

Oh wow that was fast! Thank you so much! I thought that’s what it might have been, googling around on the web, but most of the pictures I found showed the spider to be much bigger than the one we had (like the size of my palm or bigger) this guy was much smaller in that regards. Which I suppose the fact that he’s a male would explain that lol
Either way, thanks for clarifying! Now I can ease my coworker’s fears that this spider is not going to put him in the hospital haha
Stef

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: love bug
Location: Kelowna, British Columbia, Canada
May 18, 2016 11:44 am
Hello 😀
This punk jumped on my face in the night, a couple weeks back.. I tried to catch him, but he escaped.
Today however, I caught him going about his business speedily, high up on the wall.
Having a hard time identifying this lovely specimen… Please help.
Much love to all the insect lovers ♡
Signature: Tina Marie

Ground Spider

Ground Spider

Subject: sneaky punks
Location: Keliwna, British Columbia, Canada
May 21, 2016 4:50 pm
Hello Bugman.. I sent a similar identification request just the other day. Same spider type, different specimen.. This one being larger and more photogenic. Excited for an ID on these guys. Love your website!!!
Signature: Tina Marie

Ground Spider

Ground Spider

Dear Tina Marie,
We went back through our unanswered mail to locate your original submission.  We believe both of your spiders are the same species of Ground Spider in the family Gnaphosidae, and that species is
Sergiolus montanus based on this BugGuide image.  According to BugGuide:  “There appears to be quite a bit of variation in the abdominal patterning of this species. A microscopic exam of the spider’s genitalia is typically necessary for accurate identification.”

Ground Spider

Ground Spider

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Name That Nope!
Location: Chesapeake, Virginia
May 20, 2016 2:26 pm
I found this neat little guy running around my smoker 2 days ago (May 18, 2016). I live in Chesapeake, VA. I’ve reached out to the internet via Facebook and Imgur as well as searched through a spider database i found with no matches. Suggestions were a Juvenile Orb Weaver (which we’ve had a few of over the years) or theridion grallator.
Signature: -Anthony T.

"Blind Eyed" Orbweaver

“Blind Eyed” Orbweaver

Dear Anthony,
Orbweaver is a general name for a Spider from the family Araneidae and according to BugGuide:  “There are approximately 3,500 species worldwide, with 180 occurring north of Mexico.”  But for the eerie pair of blind eyespots on your individual, we thought it resembled, especially in the true eye arrangement,
Araneus alboventris pictured on BugGuide and described on BugGuide as “Carapace, sternum, legs greenish yellow. Bright yellow rings around posterior median eyes. Abdomen dorsum with black patch bordered by crimson red border on golden yellow background.”  Then on BugGuide we found a male, recognizable because of the enlarged pedipalps, the first pair of appendages that are used to transfer sperm to the female.  A comment compares this individual to Araneus alboventris.  We suspect this is a white spotted color variation of Araneus alboventris and we propose the common name Blind Eyed Orbweaver.  We love the many views you provided, including the lateral view that reveals the spinnerets.

"Blind Eyed" Orbweaver

“Blind Eyed” Orbweaver

"Blind Eyed" Orbweaver

“Blind Eyed” Orbweaver

"Blind Eyed" Orbweaver revealing spinnerets

“Blind Eyed” Orbweaver revealing spinnerets

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Spider?
Location: Portland, Oregon
May 17, 2016 5:32 pm
Hi, I live in Portland, Oregon. This brown spider ??? was on my wall in my garage. It is about 2cm long, maybe smaller, has thorny legs, a white stripe on its lower back, and two eyes bulging out of the sides of its head. I didn’t see any webs nearby. I tried researching these specs but was unable to find anything. Can you tell me anything about it? Thanks.
Signature: Susan F.

Male Lynx Spider

Male Lynx Spider

Dear Susan,
This is a Lynx Spider in the family Oxyopidae, and what you have mistaken for bulging eyes are actually the pedipalps, which are often greatly enlarged in males since they are organs that are used to transfer sperm to the female during mating.  We believe we have correctly identified your Lynx Spider as
Oxyopes tridens based on this BugGuide image.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Spider in Hydrangea
Location: Texas
May 14, 2016 9:06 pm
What kind of spider is this? is it venomous or harmful?
Thanks
Signature: Jacob Chapman

Running Crab Spider, we believe

Running Crab Spider, we believe

Dear Jacob,
We believe this is a Running Crab Spider in the family Philodromidae, and possibly in the genus
Philodromus which is well represented on BugGuide.  According to BugGuide, the family members can be recognized because they:  “tend to have the second pair of legs significantly longer than the first pair, which distinguishes them from the similar Thomisid crab spiders. In addition, thomisids have third and fourth legs that are shorter and more slender than the first two pairs of legs, while philodromid legs are subequal in length.”  While Running Crab Spiders do have venom that they use to incapacitate prey, they are not considered dangerous to humans.  The long first appendages, known as pedipalps, indicate your individual is a male.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Spider
Location: Hartford ky
May 13, 2016 11:11 am
Help me identify this spider
Signature: Jobeth

Crab Spider

Crab Spider

Dear Jobeth,
This is a harmless Crab Spider in the family Thomisidae, and we believe it most closely resembles one of the Bark Crab Spiders from the genus
Bassaniana pictured on BugGuide.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination