Currently viewing the category: "Spiders"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Trap door?
Location: Oceanside CA
September 21, 2016 9:27 pm
Bug man think I got a trap door. What do you think?
Oceanside after the rain..
Signature: Chainsaw

Male California Trapdoor Spider

Male California Trapdoor Spider

Dear Chainsaw,
This is indeed a male California Trapdoor Spider and it appeared right on schedule, though your September rain was rather unseasonal in Southern California.  It will be interesting to see how changes in our weather patterns will affect populations of native species.  Male California Trapdoor Spiders wander in search of mates after the first rains of the season.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Yellowish Orange Spider with stripes on legs
Location: Garden in Portland, OR in September
September 20, 2016 10:16 am
I have a picture of a spider which I would like to identify in case it bites or is otherwise dangerous.
Signature: Thanks Ilze Choi

Orbweaver

Orbweaver

Dear Ilze,
This is a harmless Orbweaver in the family Araneidae.  Large Orbweavers might bite, but they are not aggressive, and the bite will cause nothing more than local swelling and tenderness.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Arrow spider and goldenrod
Location: Troy, VA
September 18, 2016 12:22 pm
Hi Daniel,
I’m trying hard not to inudate you with photos, but I thought you might like this image of an arrow spider by some goldenrod. While the spider is not using the goldenrod as direct source of food, it is nicely camouflaged by the goldenrod and seems to be using it as a way to hunt insects that do feed on the goldenrod. The yellow of the spider and the yellow of the goldenrod are remarkably similar. Also, it’s such a cool little spider.
Signature: Grace Pedalino

Arrowhead Micrathena

Arrowshaped Micrathena

Dear Grace,
One couldn’t help but to disagree more with your belief that this Arrowshaped Micrathena “is not using the goldenrod as a direct source of food” because though it is not eating the goldenrod, it is eating the insects that are attracted to the goldenrod.  While Arrowhead Micrathenas would survive without the goldenrod, we believe that they and other orbweavers as well as carnivorous insects including preying mantids thrive in a goldenrod meadow.  This is a marvelous addition to our Goldenrod Meadow tag and we agree heartily that the coloration of the Arrowshaped Micrathena is perfect with the goldenrod.  Here is a nice BugGuide image of an Arrowhead Micrathena.  We forgot that we had a 10 Most Beautiful Spiders tag, and we are adding your Arrowhead Micrathena to that tag.

Arrowhead Micrathena

Arrowshaped Micrathena

Arrowhead Micrathena

Arrowshaped Micrathena

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: More Spider Fungus?
Location: Milwaukee, WI
September 18, 2016 1:45 pm
Took this photo in the crypt area in the basement of the Cavalry Cemetery Chapel in Milwaukee, WI. A living spider is in the picture too as well as something else that is much more prominent. It reminded me of this: https://www.wired.com/2012/12/spider-building-spider/, but then I saw your posts and concluded that it was a living spider alongside a dead one overtaken by fungus (definitely dead because I touched it and, thank goodness, it didn’t move!). I wonder if the living one will soon suffer the same fate. Anyway, I thought you’d like another photo of this phenomena. Thanks for your great website!
Signature: Allison Jornlin

Spider with Fungus Infection

Spider with Fungus Infection

Dear Allison,
Thank you for submitting your image of a Cellar Spider infected with fungus.  There has been quite a robust challenge to our stand that these Fungus Riddled Spiders are generally dead.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Black wolf spider?
Location: Troy, VA
September 14, 2016 8:43 am
I saw this spider last night. It was up high at the junction between the exterior wall and a porch roof. I didn’t see any evidence of a web. I think I can just barely see a pale stripe running along its head. We have lots of wolf spiders in the area, but I have never seen one with this color variation before. It was a big spider, but I can’t really say for sure its size as it was quite far up the wall. Could this be a black wolf spider? I apologize for the indifferent quality of the photograph.
thanks for an invaluable website.
Signature: Grace Pedalino

Wolf Spider

Wolf Spider

Dear Grace,
We agree that your spider looks structurally like a Wolf Spider, and we agree with you that the black coloration is unusual.  While we cannot state for certain that the species is correct, your individual does resemble
Allocosa funerea which is pictured on BugGuide.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Looks like an egg sac
Location: South East NC
September 11, 2016 8:14 am
Hi, found this inside the rain deverter on my husbands truck this morning.
Do you know what it is?
Thank you!
Signature: Suzanne

Crablike Spiny Orbweaver Egg Sac

Crablike Spiny Orbweaver Egg Sac

Dear Suzanne,
The first thought that passed through our mind when we looked at your image is that this might be the egg sac of a spider, and we followed that supposition, which quickly led us to the Featured Creatures site and a nearly identical image of the Egg Sac of a Crablike Spiny Orbweaver or Spinybacked Orbweaver Spider,
Gasteracantha cancriformis.  The egg sacs are described on Featured Creatures as being:  “Ovate egg sacs, 20 to 25 mm long by 10 to 15 mm wide, are deposited on the undersides of leaves adjacent to the female’s web from October through January. The egg mass consists of 101 to 256 eggs, with a mean of 169 (based on 15 egg masses). After the eggs are laid on a white silken sheet, they are first covered with a loose, tangled mass of fine white or yellowish silk, then several strands of dark green silk are laid along the longitudinal axis of the egg mass, followed by a net-like canopy of coarse green and yellow threads. Eggs are frequently attacked by specialized predators, primarily Phalacrotophora epeirae (Brues) (Diptera: Phoridae), and occasionally Arachnophago ferruginea Gahan (Hymenoptera: Eupelmidae) (Muma and Stone 1971). Eggs take 11 to 13 days to hatch, then spend two to three days in a pink and white deutova stage before molting to the first instar.”  A similar image can be found on Nature Closeups and on BugGuide.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination