Currently viewing the category: "Spiders"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Which spider?
Location: Anaheim,California
May 2, 2016 8:34 pm
Can you identify this spider for me. Sorry it’s not the clearest (I know, another one of those), but your best guess would be helpful. It was in my kitchen this morning and it’s the first time I’ve ever seen one near or in my house.
Found today, May2nd, 2016, in Anaheim, California. We live in an urban neighborhood, house built in the 60s. 64 degrees out, clear cool day.
Signature: Huh? “You’re the greatest”, “All my love”… Lol. Not sure what you mean, you pick.

Black Footed Spider

Black Footed Spider

Generally, the signature line in our standard form is used so that folks may use their real name or some funny phrase for those who want to maintain internet anonymity.  This is a Black Footed Spider or Yellow Sac Spider, Cheiracanthium mildei, based on this BugGuide image.  According to BugGuide, it is  “More often found inside man-made structures.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Spider from Sierra Nevadas
Location: Grass Valley CA
May 1, 2016 3:35 pm
Hi there, this guy came waltzing into our garage last night, I can’t figure out if it’s a wolf spider or ebony taranchula, love to know your thoughts.
Signature: Ryan

California Ebony Tarantula

California Ebony Tarantula

Dear Ryan,
This is most definitely NOT a Wolf Spider and after doing some research, we are concluding you are correct that it is a California Ebony Tarantula or at least another member of the genus
Aphonopelma.  Your individual is a male.  Male Tarantulas are frequently found wandering in search of a mate.  Female Tarantulas are more sedentary.  News from the Bernard Field Station has some marvelous images and you can also find similar looking individuals on this BugGuide posting and this BugGuide posting. 

California Ebony Tarantula

California Ebony Tarantula

Thank you so much for your reply, I am a teacher and I am really looking forward to sharing this with my class and encouraging kids to let them live in their gardens as they are awesome for the ecosystem.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Large spider
Location: East Tennessee. Johnson city
April 30, 2016 2:09 pm
Just curious about what type of spider this is.
Signature: Halston Brooks

Male Nursery Web Spider

Male Nursery Web Spider

Dear Halston,
We believe this is a male Nursery Web Spider,
Pisaurina mira, a species well represented on our site, though we generally receive images of female Nursery Web Spiders.  Males have much larger pedipalps, the leglike appendages that are near the chelicerae or fangs.  According to the Spiders of Kentucky:  “Like the chelicerae, a spider’s pedipalps are part of its mouth, and are located just between the chelicerae and first pair of legs on the cephalothorax. Pedipalps are jointed, and look somewhat like small legs. They are not used like legs, though.  Instead, they are more like antennae: pedipalps help the spider sense objects that it encounters.  Some spiders also use their pedipalps to shape their webs and to aid in prey capture and feeding.  Pedipalps are used by male spiders to transfer sperm to female spiders.  In fact, you can usually distinguish a male spider from a female because of the male’s enlarged pedipalps.  All arachnids have pedipalps, but they often look quite different than spider pedipalps.  In Scorpions, for instance, the large pincers are actually modified pedipalps.”  Nursery Web Spiders do not spin webs to snare prey.  The female builds a nursery web to protect the young and both sexes hunt rather than to wait passively for prey.  Here is a BugGuide posting that illustrates the eye arrangement which we used to identify your individual.  Our big doubt regarding this identification was the size of the spinnerets visible in your individual.  We did locate an image of an adult male on the Spiders In Ohio site that possesses similar spinnerets (scroll to view image), the organs used in spinning silk.

Male Nursery Web Spider

Male Nursery Web Spider

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Someone recognize?
Location: Rio, Brazil
April 26, 2016 11:05 pm
Someone recognize this spider ?
Signature: Assaf

Silver Argiope

Silver Argiope

Dear Assaf,
This gorgeous spider looks to us like a North American species, the Silver Argiope, and there is a matching image of the ventral view on BugGuide.
  According to Corbis Images, the Silver Argiope, Argiope argentata, is also found in Brazil.  According to our sister site from Brazil, Insetologia, the Silver Argiope is known as Aranha de Prata.

This great, Daniel.
Thank you very much!
Assaf

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Fascinating Spider
Location: Fairlight NSW Australia
April 28, 2016 7:05 pm
Have been observing this little guy building silk bridges between our tables and chairs on the balcony this morning and wondered if i should stay calmly seated and curious or run around screaming and flailing my arms in the air because its a man eater. What kind of spider is it please?
Signature: Curious Mich

Jumping Spider

Jumping Spider

Dear Curious Mich,
Fear Not.  This Jumping Spider in the family Salticidae is perfectly harmless.  Jumping Spiders do not build webs in which to snare prey, but rather they jump great distances, pouncing on their prey.

Thank you so much. I will continue observing it spinning silk threads to build bridges between my balcony furniture at a longer distance. Appreciate your time and help.
Curious Mich

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Please ID spider
Location: Plattsburgh, NY
April 24, 2016 11:31 am
Trying to ID this critter.
Signature: Luke T. Bush

Sac Spider

Sac Spider

Dear Luke
Based on this and other BugGuide images, we believe this is a Sac Spider in the genus
Cheiracanthium.  According to BugGuide:  “Some species are thought to be slightly dangerous. However, this may not be true.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination