Currently viewing the category: "Spiders"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Fishing Spider?
Location: Shepherdstown, West Virginia
April 16, 2015 9:36 am
I found this gorgeous spider in an out building about a week ago (April 2015). At first I assumed it was some type of Wolf Spider, but further research has me now believing that it might be a Fishing Spider instead. It was rather large in size and was patient enough to allow me to get a few quick photos before it raced off to find cover. I’m also assuming it’s a female. I’m a huge bug fan and love your website! Thanks for what you do!
Signature: A Bug Geek

Fishing Spider

Fishing Spider

Dear Bug Geek,
We love your images of a Fishing Spider in the genus
Dolomedes.  Many years ago, Daniel had a photography exhibit at the college in Shepherdstown.

Fishing Spider

Fishing Spider

Fishing Spider

Fishing Spider

Sue Dougherty, Amy Gosch, Hanalie Sonneblom, Katie Pasulka Casas, Jessica M. Schemm, Kristi E. Lambert, Andrea Leonard Drummond liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: ID: Happy face Ebo species?
Location: San Mateo County, CA
April 15, 2015 4:54 pm
Hi,
I’m wondering if you might be able to identify this Ebo to species – I found it a few days ago in San Mateo, California. There are very few Ebo photos online and barely any keys, but there are only eight species to choose from in North America. I am not an expert, just the finder/photographer, but I’d love to know if possible.
Here’s the photo link on BugGuide: http://bugguide.net/node/view/1055794#1870794 And my original post of this spider on iNaturalist, which includes better geodata and an alternate/enhanced photo: http://www.inaturalist.org/observations/1392763
Thank you so much for doing this – !
Signature: – Robin Agarwal

Running Crab Spider

Running Crab Spider

Hi Robin,
Now that the contributors of BugGuide have determined that your image is a Running Crab Spider in the genus
Ebo, you may get additional assistance there as well as on our site.  We are posting your image and we hope our readership can contribute to your request.

Hi Daniel,
As of yesterday, it was identified as Ebo evansae by Darrell Ubick, Arachnologist at the Cal Academy of Science.
Thanks for your help on this!
– Robin

Thanks for letting us know Robin.  We are updating our posting.

Andrea Leonard Drummond liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: huntsman
Location: Perth,Western Australia
April 16, 2015 6:30 am
I just sent you a msg re-paraylised huntsman on my windowsill and didnt have the link to send a photo so here they are.
What can i do with it?

Subject: Huntsman Spider
April 16, 2015 6:02 am
I live in western Australia. Huntsman spiders are common but never really seen in my area, however with the change in weather in the last week i’ve seen 2 being dragged by wasps. One made it back to its nest while the other couldn’t quite get it up the wall into the tiny hole. Now i have a paraylised huntsman sitting on my windowsill and have no idea what to do with it. Can you help?
Signature: zoe

Spider Wasp and Huntsman Spider

Spider Wasp and Huntsman Spider

Dear Zoe,
Female Spider Wasps in the family Pompilidae sting and paralyze Spiders to feed their young, laying an egg on the paralyzed spider which provides living and fresh (not dead and dried out)
food for the developing larva that eats its still living meal.  Your letter did not indicate why the Spider Wasps left behind the spiders, but we would urge you to not interfere in the future if that is what happened.  It takes tremendous effort for a female Spider Wasp to provide for her brood.  If enough venom was injected into the spider, it will most likely not recover.  We have numerous postings from Australia of Spider Wasps and Huntsman Spider prey.

Hi Daniel, thank you for your reply. My apologies, I had sent 2 different questions the second just contained photo’s. I can promise I didn’t interfere with anything. I seem to have nesting’s of wasps under the house and also in the roof.  The wasp simply gave up trying to pull the huntsman up the wall. It went up and down 3 times, nearly getting there on the 3rd attempt but seemed to give up and left it on the windowsill. I know its pretty much a lost battle for the huntsman and I have left it alone incase the wasp came back but it has not. So I guess my question is what to do with the paralysed but still living spider on my window? What do you suggest?

We would let nature take its course because we are guessing it is on the outside.

Jacob Helton, Jerry Pittman, Alfonso Moreno, Andrea Leonard Drummond, Sue Dougherty liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Unknown spider
Location: Mindo Ecuador
April 11, 2015 7:31 pm
Hey Its Carl again from the night walks in the cloud forest Ecuador, could do with some help identifying the family and species of this spider.
Also struggling with this larvae and praying mantis.
Signature: Thanks Carl

Possibly Wandering Spider

Possibly Wandering Spider

Dear Carl,
We believe, though we are not certain, that this might be a Wandering Spider in the genus
Phoneutria, and you may read more about Wandering Spiders on the Museum für Naturkunde Karlsruhe website where it states:  “There is no doubt that the venom of some of the species is quite potent for mammals, including humans.”  We eagerly welcome additional opinions on this identification.  Perhaps Cesar Crash of Insetologia can provide something.  In the future, please submit a single species per submission form as it makes it extremely difficult for us to categorize postings with multiple species.

Jacob Helton, Sue Dougherty, Rickie Louise Hill liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is my little buddy?
Location: Rock Hill NY
April 14, 2015 5:40 pm
Hello, I just discovered this website and I love it! I’m hoping you can help me figure out what my new little friend is. Yesterday my sister was complaining that a bee was stuck in her window so I went to go free it (I’m pretty sure it was actually a wasp) but I also noticed a tiny green spider in her window too, sitting right on the screen! I watched some kind of fly get caught in a small barely visible web, and little green friend casually walked over and started feeding! My sister has a lethal prejudice against anyone with too many legs so they couldn’t stay there. While my little friend fed, I removed the window screen (with them on it) and put it in my own window. Now they’re safe and enjoying the gnats that hang out around my house plants near by. It’s newly spring here after a long winter. I’ve never seen anyone like this before. I think they have transparent hair on their legs but they’re so small its difficult to see. When I shine a fla shlight there appears to be some gold along the center of the orange stripe. Eight teeny tiny black eyes. Gooey looking fangs. Walks slowly sometimes but mostly stays in one spot. All together probably the size of a dime.
I’m sorry about the image quality, all I have right now is my iphone. If they hang out for a while I’ll try to update with better pictures. Thank you so much :-)
Signature: Jocelyn

Long-Jawed Orbweaver

Long-Jawed Orbweaver

Dear Jocelyn,
This little beauty is a Long-Jawed Orbweaver,
Tetragnatha viridis, and we quickly identified it on BugGuide.  We were totally charmed by your email and we are awarding you the Bug Humanitarian Award for your kindness to this harmless spider.  Out of curiosity, how many legs are too many?

Jerry Pittman, Rickie Louise Hill, Sue Dougherty, Amy Gosch, Marc Hutton liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Spider on patio
Location: Los Angeles
April 9, 2015 1:21 pm
Who is his friendly spider?
Signature: Curious patio farmer

Jumping Spider

Jumping Spider

Dear Curious Patio Farmer,
Your Jumping Spider is in the genus
Phidippus, but we are uncertain of the species.  We found a nearly identical match, also from Los Angeles, posted to BugGuide, but it is only identified to the genus level.  It might be Phidippus formosus, and BugGuide provides this comment regarding that name:  “If I’m reading the World Spider Catalog correctly, Phidippus formosus is an older name for what is currently called Phidippus johnsoni.  I don’t have Hogue’s book to see what was pictured, but since it appears to have been published in 1974, shortly after the name change, it was probably a photo of Phidippus Johnsoni and Hogue just didn’t have the most up-to-date name for it.”  Though BugGuide has numerous images of the Johnson Jumper, not exactly matches the coloration and markings on your individual.

Jumping Spider

Jumping Spider

Christy Harris, Jaymie B. Williamson liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination