Currently viewing the category: "Spiders"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

December 15, 2014
Book Review:  A Huntsman Spider in My House by Michelle Ray and illustrated by Sylvie Ashford
We quickly jumped on the opportunity to review Michelle Ray’s new children’s book and we are pleased to endorse the message it conveys.  The home does contain many unwelcome pests, but there are also many beneficial species that either accidentally or purposely find themselves inside.  Huntsman Spiders are common in Australia, and they are generally considered benign creatures that do no harm to human inhabitants, yet they are frequently subject to unnecessary carnage because they are large and scary appearing to the uninformed public.  The young, nameless female protagonist of Sylvie Ashford’s charming book speaks in rhyme as she explains the habits of Huntsman Spiders to children as well as to the adults that read the book aloud.  Our personal favorite of all of Sylvie Ashford’s colorful illustrations is the one that accompanies the text “I could squash him with my shoe, but he’s not hurting me.”  We thoroughly endorse educating young children to have more tolerance for the lower beasts in hope of reducing Unnecessary Carnage.  This book is suitable for young children learning to read and it has particular relevance for Australian children.  This book is a nice stocking stuffer.

Unnecessary Carnage averted:  "I could squash him with my shoe, but he's not hurting me."  Illustration by Sylvie Ashford

Unnecessary Carnage averted: “I could squash him with my shoe, but he’s not hurting me.” Illustration by Sylvie Ashford

Subject: Huntsman Spider Children’s Book Review Request
Website: www.littleaussiecritters.com
November 29, 2014 12:43 am
Hi Daniel
I hope you are well.
My name is Michelle Ray and I am a childrens author from Sydney, Australia.
I would like to ask if you would consider writing an honest review on your blog of my new children’s picture book titled ‘A Huntsman Spider In My House’ for 0-5 years, it is educational, charmingly illustrated and fun.
I would love to send you a copy.
I love your blog, book and ethos and support your efforts to promote the life of bugs and spiders of course!
If you are willing, I will pop one in the post to you – please let me know where to send it and if you have any other thoughts.
I hope to hear from you,
best wishes,
Michelle Ray
www.littleaussiecritters.com
Signature: Michelle Ray

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Subject: Spider
Location: Shanksville, PA
December 14, 2014 6:57 am
Do you know what kind of spider this is?
Signature: Pat Hockenberry

Shamrock Orbweaver

Shamrock Orbweaver

Dear Pat,
We believe this Orbweaver is a Shamrock Orbweaver,
Araneus trifolium, a highly variable species that according to BugGuide:  “occurs in a variety of colors.”  This individual from BugGuide looks very much like your individual.  Orbweavers, though large and brightly colored, are considered harmless.  They are docile and rarely bite humans.

Thank you so much.  This is definitely our individual.
Pat Hockenberry

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Subject: Hawaiian Argiope
Location: Waimea Canyon, Hawaii (Kauai)
December 2, 2014 12:13 am
Hi, I have another photo of the large Argiope spiders that seem to be as-yet-unidentified – this one was in a web at Waimea canyon. Photo taken 11/29/14.
If you happen to come up with an ID for this critter, please e-mail me!
-DavidR
Signature: Hawaiian nature nerd

Hawaiian Orbweaver

Hawaiian Orbweaver

Dear Hawaiian nature nerd,
This particular
Argiope species, which we first posted in 2007, has still not been identified.  Due to the remote location of these Argiope sightings, we suspect this is a species endemic to the island, which is something of a rarity in 21st Century Hawaii which has so many introduced species.  We did a search and found a YouTube video identifying Argiope avara kauaiensis as a native species.  We also located an images on Spiders.us and Google Plus.  These are all newer posings than our original posting from 2007.

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Subject: Dock spider?
Location: Troy, Michigan
December 2, 2014 11:26 am
This spider was found in the shop where I work, keeping warm by the wood stove. S/he is SO large, his abdomen about the size of a quarter, that he created quite a crowd of spectators. I thought s/he looked a lot like the dock spiders I’ve seen while camping up in Canada, especially the striping and rasps on the legs. Is that what we have here and do you know what kind it might be?
Signature: DaleShannon

Probably Cross Orbweaver

Probably Cross Orbweaver

Dear DaleShannon,
This is not a Dock Spider, a common name for a Fishing Spider in the genus
Dolomedes, but rather an Orbweaver in the genus Araneus.  Our best guess is that this is a Cross Orbweaver, Araneus diadematus.  You can compare your individual to this image on BugGuide.  Your Orbweaver is a female.  Male Orbweavers are considerably smaller.

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Subject: White crab spider in Ecuador
Location: Puerto Lopez, Manabi Province, Ecuador
November 27, 2014 7:26 pm
November 25, 2014, which was a clear day in the middle of several overcast days.
This seems to be a spider in the family Thomisidae but I am trying to determine which subfamily. It was on this clothes pin on our clothes line. When I took the pin off of the line, I noticed the spider and dropped it on the deck. That is where it stayed while I took the picture.
Do you know which subfamily it belongs to?
Signature: Emily in Ecuador

Crab Spider

Crab Spider

Dear Emily,
To the best of our knowledge, subfamilies in the family Thomisidae are not recognized.  Your spider resembles members of the genus
Misumena that are known as Flower Spiders and in North America.  You can read more about the genus on BugGuide.

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Subject: Spider in Georgia
Location: Powder Springs Ga.
November 27, 2014 11:26 am
Hello,
Thank you in advance, for any assistance you may provide in identifying the spider in the photo.
Spider was spotted outside on a deck, November 24th or 25th.
Weather was mild, approx. 50 – 60 degrees.
Thanks again..
Sincerely
Jim J
Powder Springs, Ga.
Signature: Jim J. Powder Springs, Ga

Pumpkin Spider

Pumpkin Spider

Dear Jim J.,
Pumpkin Spiders, an orange color variety of the Marbled Orbweaver, are a common autumnal sighting on our site.

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination