Currently viewing the category: "Spiders"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Identify a spider
Location: Gonagaldeniya, sri lanka.
August 30, 2015 8:33 am
Dear bugman, i want to identify this spider. He lived under the roof of our house. We are in the wet zone. And sri lanka is a tropical counrty. He builds a strong and sticky web..
Thank you!
Signature: Tharindu Dilshan

Orbweaver

Oval St. Andrew’s Cross Spider

Dear Tharindu,
Your spider is an Orbweaver, and we believe it is in the genus
Argiope.  Large Orbweavers are capable of biting people, but they are docile spiders that rarely leave their webs, and the bite is not considered dangerous.  Thanks to images posted to WongChunXing.com, we believe you have an Oval St. Andrew’s Cross Spider, Argiope aemula.  According to A Guide to Common Singapore Spiders on Habitat News:  “Unlike many other Argiope spiders, the abdomen is oval. Argiope spiders make webs which are suspended vertically 1-2 metres from the ground, the web of mature female spiders of this genus can be easily recognised by the X-shaped zigzag bands of white silk in the centre of the web.”

Orbweaver

Oval St. Andrew’s Cross Spider

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Subject: I love this spider in PA
Location: Skippack, PA
August 30, 2015 6:36 pm
I saw the spider while I was out jogging and I have never seen anything like it. I am in Pennsylvania not far from Philadelphia, in the suburbs you may say near a wooded area. It looks like it was carrying babies.
Please could you help me identify please could you help me identify us it.
Signature: Chris

Female Wolf Spider with Egg Sac

Female Wolf Spider with Egg Sac

Hi Chris,
Female Wolf Spiders, like your individual, drag their egg sac behind them to protect it, and once the spiders hatch, the young spiderlings ride about on the body of the female spider for a few days before dispersing.

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Subject: Green Lynx Spiders Everywhere!
Location: Palm Beach County, Florida
August 28, 2015 10:43 am
Hello What’s That Bug!
I was exploring Pine Glades Natural Area in northern Palm Beach County, Florida and came across lots of bug and spider life on the grasses and Spanish needles growing along the nature trail. I was able to sweet-talk a beautiful adult green lynx spider into letting me get close with my camera to snap a few pictures. I also came across very tiny spiders sitting on the Spanish needle flowers just waiting to pounce on any small bug that walked by. I believe these tiny spiders are baby green lynx spiders. I included a picture – please let me know if I am correct. It never ceases to amaze me that so much life can be found on one plant! Love your web site – I find myself visiting it frequently to help me identify insects I find while working outdoors in Palm Beach County’s natural areas.
Signature: Ann Mathews

Green Lynx Spider

Green Lynx Spider

Dear Ann,
We have numerous Green Lynx Spiders in our own garden right now in Los Angeles.  We find them on basil flowers, daisies and sunflowers where they await to ambush flying insects.  Your second spider is a species of Crab Spider in the family Tomisidae, probably
Misumenops bellulus, based on this BugGuide image, also from Florida.

Crab Spider

Crab Spider

Thank you so much for the quick response. I will add the crab spider species to the Pine Glades Natural Area animal listing. We tend to overlook the smaller critters at our natural areas – so it is great when I can photograph and identify bugs and spiders not yet in our database. Keep up the wonderful work – What’s That Bug is a fantastic resource!
Ann Mathews
Palm Beach County
Department of Environmental Resources Management

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Hello
Location: California Los Angeles
August 21, 2015 3:32 pm
Hi I walls like to identify the spider In these pictures
Signature: Rafayel

Jumping Spider

Jumping Spider

Dear Rafayel,
This is a Jumping Spider in the family Salticidae, and we would think it to be a male, yet it seems to match this image on BugGuide that is identified as a female
Phidippus adumbratus.

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Subject: Lady bird spider
Location: Veysonnaz Switzerland
August 19, 2015 1:57 am
Hi,
We are in Veysonnaz and see the ladybird spider quite regularly. My children often have seen them in the past years that we have been here on holiday.
I will attach a picture
Signature: Candy Kitsz

Ladybird Spider

Ladybird Spider

Dear Candy,
Thanks so much for sending in your image of a gorgeous male Ladybird Spider.  It is our understanding that populations of Ladybird Spiders are on the decline because of habitat loss.  We believe your individual is
Eresus cinnaberinus based on images and information on the Spiders of North West Europe site.  We are running a bit late this morning and this is the only posting we can make prior to heading to work.  We apologize to our readership and we promise to post additional images later in the day.

Hi Daniel,
Thanks for your email.
According to my children, there are quite a lot of the ladybird spiders at a certain area in Veysonnaz town. However, we have never seen them higher up on the mountain. They are very pretty and I had no idea that they were so rare.
I will post more pictures should I see them
Warmest wishes
Candy Kitsz

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Subject: Ominous looking egg sacs
Location: Garden Grove, CA.
August 16, 2015 12:59 pm
Noticed these (11) egg sacs in our Aloe barberae tree, and I have never seen anything like them in my life. I haven’t found the mama yet, but after looking around I am guessing them to be from the Bolas spider. LOL, I was ready to call the State bug authorities and have them terminated, but from what I read, they are harmless moth eaters so I will let them be. They are still a bit scary to look at.
Signature: Gman

Bolas Spider Egg Sacs

Bolas Spider Egg Sacs

Dear Gman,
We agree that these are Egg Sacs of a Bolas Spider, and we concur that the adult Bolas Spider is harmless as well as being difficult to find as they resemble bird droppings.

Bolas Spider Egg Sacs

Bolas Spider Egg Sacs

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination