Currently viewing the category: "Spiders"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Spider
Location: Mesa, AZ
March 28, 2015 12:09 am
Hello,
I found this spider in my apartment in AZ. Not sure what it is since I grew up in IL and don’t think I’ve seen this kind before. Any help would be appreciated! :)
Signature: Brittany

Possibly Spitting Spider

Possibly Spitting Spider

Dear Brittany,
We believe we have correctly identified your Spider, and if our identification is correct, this will represent a new category on our site.  This looks like a Spitting Spider in the family Scytodidae which we found on BugGuide, and where it states:  “Spitting spiders have 6 eyes and are slow moving. They are usually fairly easy to identify by their large round cephalothorax and their long, thin legs.”

Spitting Spider, we believe

Spitting Spider, we believe

Jacob Helton, Jerry Pittman, Kevin Trejo, Alisha Bragg, Ann Levitsky, Sue Dougherty, Debbie Lynn May, Rajni Qamar, Las Tres Calaveras liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Golden-backed spider
Location: Cambodia
March 24, 2015 3:38 am
Hi,
Any idea what this fella is? I took the picture in Cambodia in 2013.
Signature: Oliver

Orbweaver

Orbweaver

Dear Oliver,
This is an Orbweaver in the genus Argiope, and it is only identified to the genus level on Wildlife inthe Kingdom of Thailand site.
  It may be the St. Andrew’s Cross Spider, Argiope keyserlingi, based on this FlickR posting.

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Spider ID
Location: Salisbury NC
March 20, 2015 11:20 am
Hi,
I have been trying to ID this spider without any luck.
This was taken in Salisbury NC. in Sept 2014.
This was the only picture I could get because it was a fast spider, and was gone in a few seconds.
Thanks for any help.
Signature: David

Wolf Spider

Wolf Spider

Dear David,
This looks like some species of Wolf Spider to us based on the eye arrangement.  You can see a nice image of the eye pattern of a Wolf Spider on Animals Time where it states:  “Wolf spiders do not spin webs. They are known to run very fast. Wolf spiders usually hunt at night.” 

Alisha Bragg, Carol Love, Kathy Haines, Alfonso Moreno, Sue Dougherty, Andrea Leonard Drummond liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Black/white Hairy Spider
Location: Hollywood
March 16, 2015 4:15 pm
Hi Daniel,
This little dude was in my garden today. Mostly black and hairy —with a little bit of white. Looks like fake white eyes on the back. Large green fangs?
1. What is it? 2. Is it poisonous?
Thanks!
Signature: Temple

Bold Jumper

Bold Jumper

Dear Temple,
This jumping spider in the family Salticidae is a Bold Jumper,
Phidippus audax, a conclusion we reached by matching your excellent images to this posting on BugGuide.  There is also an excellent page on BugGuide that depicts the variability within the species.  Jumping Spiders are considered harmless to humans, though a large individual might bite.  Most all spiders are venomous, but very few are dangerous to humans because the venom is either not lethal to humans or the fangs (chelicerae) are too weak to break human skin.  Like other Jumping Spiders, this Bold Jumper does not spin a web to snare its prey.  Jumping Spiders have excellent eyesight and they hunt their prey by jumping, often from great distances.  One final note, your dude is a dudette.

Bold Jumper

Bold Jumper

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Costa Rican bug
Location: Southern Costa Rica
March 12, 2015 11:36 am
this guy was on a kitchen counter on Playa Cacao by Golfito Costa Rica and is unlike anything I know of, anybody know?
Signature: T Olesen

Jumping Spider

Jumping Spider

Dear T Olesen,
This is a Jumping Spider in the family Salticidae, and because of the long front legs, we would bet that it is a male.  Jumping Spider are harmless to humans.  They do not spin webs to snare prey.  They are hunting spiders.

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Please put this lady’s mind at ease: what is this??
Location: maryland
March 8, 2015 2:00 pm
my gut says not bed bugs because of length of legs compared to body. With the naked eye, they look like baby spiderlings of sorts but since I once gad bed bugs before, and have found a few of these in various parts of my house (closet wall joints, of crawling across wall), that anxiety kicks in again. But since able to take pupcs and then zoo. In and crop, I can see a little better but would like to have someone
Tell me WHAT they are. The following is a pic of one bug at different angle that I put on clear tale and in a Baggie. Please confirm not a bv, and if you can, tell me what it is. It would put a nervous lady’s mind at ease. Thanks so much!
Signature: damsel in distress

Possibly Wall Spider

Possibly Wall Spider

Dear Damsel in Distress,
We believe this is a Wall Spider,
Oecobius annulipes.  According to the Arizonensis site:  “This is probably the most abundant of house spiders in the southwestern United States. Full grown they are 3 mm or less in length … too small to bite through human skin. Their webs are positioned in corners and along window sills where they catch minute crawling or flying insects. The webs readily gather dust and are the bane of fastidiuous housekeepers. The can also be found on outside walls and on surfaces of boulders in more natural habitats.”  BugGuide notes the scientific name a Oecobius navus and states:  “Cosmopolitan/Pantropical; a highly synanthropic, non-native species. Shear (1970) examined specimens from all over the world and found very little variation, and there is little evidence as to the point of origin.”  According to BugGuide, there are reported sightings in Maryland.

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination