Currently viewing the category: "Spiders"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Vietnam cave dwelling spider
Location: Marble mountains, near Da Nang, Vietnam
April 13, 2014 12:23 pm
We were exploring a dark cave, in the marble mountains, near Hoi An, Vietnam, in March this year, and came across this spider. It’s hard to tell in the photo we took but it’s leg span was approx 5-6 inches. It had striped markings on it. It was in a pitch black cave, we discovered it trying to find our way using a camera flash! Would be really interested to find out what kind of spider it is!
Signature: KH

Possibly Huntsman Spider

Possibly Huntsman Spider

Dear KH,
We cannot say for certain, but the general shape of this spider as well as the size you indicate leads us to believe this is a Huntsman Spider or Giant Crab Spider in the family Sparassidae.  We will attempt additional research.

Hi Daniel,
Thanks so much for getting back to me so quickly. That is really interesting, thank you!
Best wishes,
Kate

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Spider Found In Nelson, BC, Canada . Never Seen It Before
Location: Nelson, BC, Canada
April 11, 2014 4:57 pm
today during a walk i stumbled apon a spider that made my skin crawl just looking at it!! i have lived in Canada my whole life and have never seen one like this. unfortunatly some of these pictures were taken as it posed “belly up” but its legs are tucked and short and has some yellow marking on the lower underside.. im very curious into discovering what type of spider it is! please help
Signature: Regan

Cork-Lid Trapdoor Spider

Cork-Lid Trapdoor Spider

Dear Regan,
This is a Cork-Lid Trapdoor Spider in the genus Ummidia, and despite it making your skin crawl, it is a harmless species.  The spots on the underside of the abdomen are quite distinctive.  You can see a matching image on BugGuide.
  Spring rains may have flushed it from its burrow.

Cork-Lid Trapdoor Spider

Cork-Lid Trapdoor Spider

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: striped stranger
Location: Caledon area on N2
April 7, 2014 9:57 pm
Hello Bugman
I’ve looked on the internet trying to identify this striped spider that I saw while in South Africa. We were travelling on the N2 and pulled over to look at the national bird in a farm field just about an hour outside of Cape Town. Walking through the grass we noticed this large spider, although not colourful. Would also like to know if it is poisonous.
Thank you
Signature: Angela

Orbweaver

Orbweaver

Dear Angela,
This is an Orbweaver in the family Araneidae, and members in the family are venomous, but they are reluctant to bite humans, and they are not considered dangerous, with the bite producing only local swelling and tenderness.  We did locate a matching image on Superstock, but it is not identified beyond the family level.  We then found a matching image on BioDiversity Explorer and it is identified as
Argiope australis.  It is odd that your individual was found on the ground.  Orbweavers are clumsy when not in their webs, and they are relatively stationary spiders, preferring to spin a web in the same location unless they are disturbed.  Perhaps someone who passed its web prior to your arrival knocked this individual to the ground.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Sac??
Location: Virginia
April 4, 2014 11:59 am
What is that??
Signature: -thank you

Golden Orbweaver Egg Sac

Golden Orbweaver Egg Sac

This is the Egg Sac of a large, beautiful and harmless spider, the Golden Orbweaver or Black and Yellow Orbweaver, Argiope aurantia.

Thank you so much.. it stays

We are very happy to hear that you are tolerant of harmless spiders in your garden.  We hope some of the spiderlings that hatch will remain in your garden, but they will also disperse on the wind, a process known as ballooning.  It is possible that the wind may carry some of the young spiderlings many miles from their birth location.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: running on a trail
Location: Santa Rosa, California
April 1, 2014 7:10 pm
Greetings,
I was running on a trail in Southern California and came across this…… bug spider guy/gal. I stopped and noticed it was actually being attacked by an army of ants. Never seeing a spider this big in California I decided to pick it up with a stick. I managed to get the ants off and relocate the creature to a safer location.
Signature: Jamie

Trapdoor Spider

Trapdoor Spider

Hi Jamie,
This beautiful spider is a Trapdoor Spider, but we are not certain of the genus or species.  It looks very similar to this
Aptostichus stanfordianus that is pictured on BugGuide.

Trapdoor Spider

Trapdoor Spider

Thank you! It was quite beautiful and intriguing.

WE forgot to tag your posting with the Bug Humanitarian Award for rescuing this Trapdoor Spider from the Ants.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Massive wolf spider?
Location: Bloomington, Indiana
March 30, 2014 1:45 pm
Hello! I found this massive spider back in October of 2007, in Bloomington, Indiana. I thought it was a plastic Halloween toy at first because it was so huge, but when my dog stepped on it (hence the missing leg) it ran, and I realized it was the biggest spider I’d ever seen in person. I tried to identify it, but couldn’t find a spider that had both an orange stripe and banded legs. My pictures are a little grainy since they were taken on an old cell phone camera, but the head-on one seems to show at least one huge eye. Also, for size reference, my shoes were a size 8! Thanks for reading and I hope you can identify this spider I’ve been wondering about for years.
Signature: Marina

Wolf Spider

Wolf Spider

Dear Marina,
We believe your Wolf Spider might be in the genus
Hogna, which include the largest North American Wolf Spiders.  See BugGuide for images from the genus Hogna.  We will try to get the opinion of Spider expert Mandy Howe.

Wolf Spider

Wolf Spider

Immediate Update
Continued searching led us to this image of
Tigrosa aspersa on Bugguide, and we believe it is a perfect match.  According to BugGuide:  “ Hogna(Tigrosa) aspersa females are 18 to 25 millimeters in length, and the males are 16 to 18 millimeters. They are similar to H. carolinensis in body color but have a distinct narrow line of yellow hairs on the carapace in the vicinity of the eyes. The legs are banded with a lighter brown color at the joints. The males are much lighter in color than the females, and only their third and fourth pairs of legs are banded with a lighter color.”

Wolf Spider

Wolf Spider

5:07 PM (2 hours ago)
Thank you!
Looking around on BugGuide, I think it might be in the Tigrosa family (maybe Tigrosa aspersa?) which used to be a part of Hogna, from what I can tell. This looks very much like it.
~Marina

Ah, looks like our emails crossed paths! Yes, I think that’s exactly it. Thank you so much! It’s great to know what it (she?) finally is.
~Marina

Based on what we have read on BugGuide, we believe this is a female spider as they are considerably larger than the males of the species.

Confirmation from Mandy Howe
Hi Daniel, sorry about the late reply again — but yep, I think Tigrosa aspersa is spot on for that female wolf spider. :-)

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination