Currently viewing the category: "Spiders"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Spider
Location:  Vermont
July 26, 2014
Thank you!
No one identified my spider from a couple months ago?
Attached.
Notice her front 2 leggies are together, so dainty.
I wondered at first, as you might well imagine.
She was larger than your usual Vt spider…
Best!
MG

Nursery Web Spider

Nursery Web Spider

Dear MG,
This is a Nursery Web Spider,
Pisaurina mira.  We are unable to respond to all of our mail, and it is possible that this arrived when we were away from the office.  If you don’t hear back from us within a week or so, we would urge you to resend the request, and remember to attach the image again.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: WT Spider?
Location: Bronx, NY
July 13, 2014 5:22 pm
Saw this spider in Bronx, NY last June. Beautiful pattern on its back!
Signature: Mark

Jumping Spider

Jumping Spider

Hi Mark,
This gorgeous spider is a Jumping Spider in the family Salticidae, and we are going to attempt to research the species at a later time.  Jumping Spiders are harmless to humans.  They are hunting spiders that do not spin webs to trap prey, preferring to pounce on flies and other prey, often from a great distance.  The large eyes have excellent vision, and the accuracy of their hunting skills are quite wondrous.

Jumping Spider

Jumping Spider

Amazing! Thanks so much!
FYI,  I’ve got a bunch of other insect closeup photos that I’d love to send for ID as I become more interested in the world of insect photography. I know you guys are busy, so I hope you don’t mind. I frequently post these pictures with IDs on a photo enthusiast website, so please know that your help to me is also benefitting other photo enthusiasts in their knowledge of insects.
Thanks again!

We would love additional high quality images, but please submit only one per day.  You can submit images and identification requests by using the Ask What’s That Bug? link on our site.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Hacklemesh Weaver Spider
Location: Central New York
July 7, 2014 6:53 pm
My mom found this spider in her ice cream churn that she kept in her basement and asked me to identify if it was dangerous or not. I took some pictures of it and released it into a pile of slate outside. From what I can tell, I’m pretty sure it is a female Hacklemesh Weaver Spider. Is my id of it correct and should she worry about them?
Signature: good son

What's That Spider???

What’s That Spider???

Dear good son,
Alas, we aren’t certain.  Your spider does resemble this female Hacklemesh Weaver,
Amaurobius ferox, that is posted to BugGuide, however the BugGuide individual seems to have longer and thinner legs than your individual.  Our first thought was female Southern House Spider, but BugGuide does not report them as far north as New York.  Perhaps one of our readers can assist in this identification.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: California Tarantula?
Location: Thousand Oaks CA
July 6, 2014 9:41 pm
Thank you for such an interesting and informative site!
I went for a walk with my husband and kids tonight- a hot July evening in Thousand Oaks CA, and my husband spotted this crawling up a curb.
I tried looking through your site for anything similar, but it didn’t seem to match anything I could find. It was almost as big as my hand, and the main part of the body appeared to be hairless, but the “butt” was hairy, and narrower than the main part of the body.
Signature: Kay

Tarantula

Tarantula

Hi Kay,
Tarantula sightings in much of Southern California are becoming rarer and rarer due to habitat loss, and now they are only seen in areas that abut natural open space.  Most North American Tarantulas are in the genus
Aphonopelma which is represented on BugGuide.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Spider (Identification)
Location: Montenegro
July 4, 2014 4:21 am
Found this guy on a pile of big stone tiles in the sun, The picture isn’t perfect but I think it had 6 of those orange/red spots on his back. Small in size few mm in size (3-7mm maybe?).
Signature: eatyourdog

Immature female Widow Spider

Immature female Widow Spider

Dear eatyourdog,
This is an immature female Widow Spider in the genus
Latrodectus.  According to this araneae website, the species Latrodectus tredecimguttatus is found in Montenegro and the site states it is found:  “In dry habitats, dunes, sandy beaches, shingle beaches and on low vegetation.  This species can bite humans, as also all other Latrodectus species in the world. Often, a bite causes significant effects, with severe and long-lasting pain in two-thirds of cases, preventing patients from sleeping in one-third of cases. Pain increases in more than half of the cases within the first hour and mostly radiates into the limbs or abdominal pain develops. Typical symptoms include sweating in about 70% of cases and further systemic effects in 20–30% of cases (nausea and vomiting in less than 20%, raised temperature and neuromuscular effects in about 10%, hypertension in less than 10% of cases). Pain usually lasts 1–2 days and the other symptoms 1–4 days. In Europe, bites have become very rare in the last decades. If needed, a symptomatic medical treatment is recommended.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Las Vegas Black Hairy Spider
Location: Henderson NV, Las Vegas suburb
July 4, 2014 12:48 pm
I love your site. I looked at your spiders for a few days but although I found the trap door spider to be close, the rear body tank is not the same shape as my unknown spider. I never saw this 2-inch spider before. It was found on the wall of my garage, in June, 110 F weather day. I captured it, took the photo then released it in some rocks at a nearby park. You can zoom in my photo to see the eyes and hair. Thank you.
Signature: Boyd in Las Vegas

Female Southern House Spider

Female Southern House Spider

Dear Boyd,
Unfortunately, you cannot really make out the eye arrangement of this spider in your image.  This is a female Southern House Spider,
Kukulcania hibernalis, and according to BugGuide:  “Females are frequently mistaken for small tarantulas or trapdoor spiders. Males are often mistaken for recluse spiders (Loxosceles). This is a totally harmless species that builds “messy” webs emanating from crevices, often on the outside of homes.”

Thanks, Dan.     Now when I walk by the park, I will say hello to her.    I never feared her but just wanted to get her farther away from human danger.
Boyd

Hi again Boyd,
Because of your sensitivity toward the natural world, we are tagging your posting with the Bug Humanitarian Award.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination