Currently viewing the category: "Snakeflies"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Snakefly?
Location: Glen Ellen, CA
April 15, 2016 1:06 pm
I was sitting on my back deck when this little bug crawled up next to me on my chair. I stared at it for a long time and couldn’t figure out what it was. Initially worried it was a termite, but considered it could be some kind of flying ant.
I found your site and it looks like it is most likely a female snakefly. Can you confirm?
Thanks!!!
Signature: Bug Rookie

Snakefly

Snakefly

Dear Bug Rookie,
You are correct that this is a Snakefly, and the pointed ovipositor at the end of her abdomen indicates she is a female.  You may be a Bug Rookie, but you did your research admirably, and your image is spectacular.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: long and skinny with aft spike
Location: San Francisco peninsula, California
March 19, 2016 5:02 pm
This fellow was resting on a west-facing screen door late afternoon yesterday, Mar. 18, 2016, in thevon the San Francisco peninsula. Maybe an inch long. Seemed lethargic.
Signature: cwr

Square Headed Snakefly

Square Headed Snakefly

Dear cwr,
We believe that based on this BugGuide image, your Snakefly is a Square Headed Snakefly in the genus
Negha.  The “aft spike” is an ovipositor, indicating this is a female.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What bug is this
Location: northern arizona
September 7, 2015 2:37 pm
Found this guy inside eating small beatles. Looks like a larvae of shine kind, maybe a Dragon fly?
Signature: matt

Snakefly Larva

Snakefly Larva

Dear Matt,
This is a predatory Snakefly Larva in the order Raphidioptera.  The adult Snakefly is a long necked, winged insect with a weak flight.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Is this a mantisfly?
Location: www.google.de/maps/place/Oberschwäbisches+Museumsdorf+Kürnbach/@50.856122,8.1137543,5.25z/data=!4m6!1m3!3m2!1s0x0:0x1a12f9df180e6811!2sOberschwäbisches+Museumsdorf+Kürnbach!3m1!1s0x0:0x1a12f9df180e6811
August 16, 2015 3:00 am
Hi,
I found this bug in front of a farm house in southern germany in july. I had never seen such an insect before so i took the foto. It looks as if it is hevily injured which would explain that it stood still quite long.
It somehow looks like a mantisfly but all pictures of mantisflies occuring in Germany I could find look diffferent so I decided to ask you for help.
Thank you very much
Signature: Roland

Snakefly

Snakefly

Dear Roland,
Although it looks somewhat similar to a Mantisfly, your insect is a Snakefly that is classified in a completely different insect order, Raphidioptera.  According to BugGuide:  “Both larvae and adults are predatory, though they are capable of catching and killing only small and weak prey. Snakefly larvae feed on eggs and larvae of various insects, as well as adults of minute arthropods (e.g. mites, springtails, barklice, and homopterans). Adults typically prefer aphids but may eat a wide variety of arthropods.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: insect id
Location: urban area nj
May 28, 2015 12:27 pm
May 27 2015 in new jersey. Just curious :)
Signature: Stephanie

Snakefly

Snakefly

Dear Stephanie,
Almost all the images we have posted of Snakeflies in the order Raphidioptera are sent from California. 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Strange bug
Location: northern California
April 17, 2015 12:39 am
it is April and i was Northern California. To be more specific the north Bay Area the day I found the big. I was relaxing in a friends backward when it landed on one of the chair pillows we were sitting near. He looks like a dragon fly praying mantis and wasp mixed in one with really cool coloring. I’ve never seen anything of this nature and was very curious to know more about this insect.
Signature: Ariana

Snakefly

Snakefly

Dear Ariana,
This interesting insect is a Snakefly in the order Raphidioptera, and though BugGuide shows them ranging west of the Mississippi River, nearly all of our reported sightings are from California.
  Snakeflies are harmless predators and BugGuide reports that:  “Both larvae and adults are predatory, though they are capable of catching and killing only small and weak prey. Snakefly larvae feed on eggs and larvae of various insects, as well as adults of minute arthropods (e.g. mites, springtails, barklice, and homopterans). Adults typically prefer aphids but may eat a wide variety of arthropods.”  What appears to be a stinger in your image is actually the ovipositor of a female, an organ used in the laying of eggs.  It is also notable that most images we receive are of female Snakeflies, and we are not certain if they are more plentiful than males, or if the presence of the ovipositor makes them more of a curiosity, or if the ovipositor is a cause of concern prompting people to be more inclined to discover if they are a stinging insect that might be harmful to humans.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination