Currently viewing the category: "Snails, Slugs and other Molluscs"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Albino Slug?
Location: Virginia
May 26, 2016 10:18 pm
I took a picture of a white slug this morning on my walkway……is it an Albino Slug or someone suggested it was a Ghost Slug, but what I’ve read, they live in Europe and I’m in Virginia.
Signature: Susan Myers

White Slug

White Slug

Dear Susan,
There is not enough detail in your image to check off the characteristics of the Ghost Slug, a species found in Europe.  We just posted another request for the identification of a White Slug found in Maryland, and we concluded it was not a Ghost Slug.  We will be postdating your request to go live while we are away from the office in June.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Pink slug looking
Location: Southeast Florida
May 31, 2016 5:22 pm
What is this
Signature: Scared

Eggs of an Apple Snail

Eggs of an Apple Snail

Dear Scared,
These are the Eggs of an Apple Snail which we identified on Nature Time.  According to the Apple Snail Website:  “It is remarkable how visible the egg clutches of many apple snail species are. The pinkish to reddish eggs are attached on the contrasting green vegetation submerging from the water (in the genus Pomacea). This makes them visually inconspicuous from many meters away for predators. This suggests a possible warning function for unpalatability. Field evidence of this unpalatability is provided by the fact that almost all animals foraging in habitats where the apple snails live, ignore these eggs: from fish to birds, they all leave them alone. Also when apple snail eggs are offered to captive predators, they often try to eat them at first, but refuse them after repeated feeding.”  According to My Florida Backyard:  “Apple snails (family Ampullariidae) are freshwater snails that are able to survive both on water and on land. By laying their eggs above the water line, apple snails protect the eggs from predation by fish and other water dwellers.”  

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Snail eating millipede
Location: Harpers Ferry, WV
May 23, 2016 5:24 pm
I thought you guys might like the picture I took this morning of a snail eating a millipede. Enjoy!
Signature: Barb

Predatory Snail Eats Millipede

Predatory Snail Eats Millipede

Dear Barb,
There is a similar image on BugGuide, but we think yours has more attractive subjects.  We don’t know if this is a native Snail or an introduced species.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: White slug
Location: Central Maryland
May 20, 2016 7:17 pm
I found this in the middle of the street on a rainy day crawling along. Googling matches its picture with the ghost slug, but what I can find says they are only in Europe. My friends and I are having a discussion about it and hope you can help us.
Signature: Wondering

Possibly Ghost Slug

Probably NOT a Ghost Slug

Dear Wondering,
We cannot say for certain that this is or is not a white variation or an albino individual of a species that was already locally established in your area, but we are pretty certain it is NOT the Ghost Slug pictured on Wikipedia and the National Museum Wales site.  According to the National Museum Wales:  “The bizarre Ghost Slug made headlines in 2008 when described as a new species from a Cardiff garden. When the first specimens were found, very little was known about this animal.”  The site continues that to:  “ensure that your slug is a true Ghost Slug (Selenochlamys ysbryda). This can be done by looking at the mantle and the eyes. The mantle … looks like a layer of skin through which the breathing hole is often visible.  This Ghost Slug has a tiny, disc-shaped mantle at the rear end of its body. It has no eye spots on its tentacles … .  Other white or pale slug species have a large, cloak-like mantle over their “shoulders” near the front of their body. They have black eye spots at the tips of two of their tentacles.”  Your individual has both the mantle and the eyespots which indicates it is NOT a Ghost Slug.  

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Update:  February 28, 2016
Thanks to a comment from Susan Hewitt, we have updated this posting of a native Brazilian Land Snail

Subject: Snail
Location: REGUA (Reserva Ecológica de Guapiaçu) Atlantic Rainforest Rio De Janeiro, Brazil
January 17, 2016 8:36 am
During my stay as a volonteer in REGUA (Reserva Ecológica de Guapiaçu) Atlantic Rainforest Rio De Janeiro, Brazil Nov 12 – Dec 7 2011 I photographed this magnificent snal. I believe people who are fascinated of these kind of animals recognize it easily.
Signature: slit

Giant African Snail Invades Brazil

Native Brazilian Land Snail

OK Slit,
You threw us on this one.  No continent in the subject line and considering your previous six submissions, we automatically assumed you would be inquiring about a Tanzanian Snail, and we located the Giant African Land Snail on A-Z Animals where we learned:  “The giant African land snail, is the largest species of snail found on land and generally grow to around 20 cm in length. The giant African land snail is native to the forest areas of East Africa but has been introduced into Asia, the Caribbean and a number of islands in both the Pacific and the Indian oceans.”  Once we realized you encountered this Snail in Brazil, we verified the original identification on Latin American Science where the headline is:  “Giant African land snails are invading Latin America.”  On National Geographic the headline reads:  “Giant Snails, Once a Delicacy, Overrun Brazil.”  We consider this to be an Invasive Exotic species and we encourage Brazilians to eat them since National Geographic states:  “The giant African snail, originally brought to Brazil as a delicacy for gourmet restaurants, has instead become a major nuisance in the country.”

Giant African Snail Invades Brazil

Native Brazilian Land Snail

Cesar Crash provides a critical warning.
Sorry, I cannot comment again.
African snail is being considered vector of meningitis, it is believed that it is dangerous even to eat leaves where it crawled and it is recomended to use a plastic bag on hand to catch it.
http://portal.fiocruz.br/pt-br/content/meningite-transmitida-por-caramujos-com-avanco-de-casos-cientistas-alertam-para-prevencao
http://laboratoriocremasco.com.br/caramujo-africano-saiba-como-evitar-a-doenca-transmitida-pelo-molusco/
But, I don’t know, this one has a light shell, I think it may be a Megalobulimus.
I Hope it helps,
Cesar.

Thanks Cesar.  We will research Megalobulimus later.

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Acrobatic slug coitus
Location: Tigard, OR
August 28, 2014 11:00 pm
A friend of mine sent these photos to me asking for my explanation of what the heck was going on here. Pasted below is my reply. Just thought you’d enjoy the pictures, post as you like, no credits necessary. I live in the Portland, OR metro area, and these pictures were taken 8/28/2014, in case you wanted to know.
“Yes indeed, this is slug sex. Perhaps the air was just right, or you happened to be playing some Rick James just a little too loud. It looks just barely post-coital, so perhaps this scene is more accurately referred to as “slug afterglow”. Either way, those white misshapen things are the slugs genitals. Slugs have both a penis and a vagina (lucky bastards), and it looks as if the one in the foreground is hastily retracting its junk. Perhaps in order to avoid the traditional slug version of pillow talk, which involves the chewing off and consuming of each others’ penises. They grow back, but still, kinda intimate for a one-night stand, don’t you think?”
Signature: Jason

Mating Slugs

Mating Slugs

Hi Jason,
We are always amazed at images of mating Slugs, and one 2006 posting of Mating Slugs resulted in quite a bit of controversy.

Thanks for that link, I really needed a good laugh. You folks are awesome, thanks for the great work!

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination