Currently viewing the category: "Snails, Slugs and other Molluscs"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Slug eggs
Location: Houston, TX
May 31, 2014 5:57 pm
Found this under a pot planter on a warm day 5-31-14 in Houston/Galveston, TX area. It appears to be a slug with its eggs. However, it doesn’t seem like a typical slug. The dorsal side is more rough while the underside is more slimy. As we messed with it, it snugged up with the eggs more. When we left it alone for a minute, the eyes came out and it began moving quite a bit.
Signature: W. Parks

Sluglike Creature Guards clutch of eggs

Leatherleaf Slug with clutch of eggs

Dear W. Parks,
Thanks for commenting on an Unknown Eggs posting from our archives and then sending your own documentation.  The creature in your image does appear to be sluglike, but we are not certain of its identity.  The clutch of eggs looks identical to that from our archives, and it is also from Texas.  We are going to feature your submission as our Bug of the Month for June 2014 even though we cannot identify it at this time.  We will attempt to research this matter.

Sluglike Creature guards clutch of eggs

Leatherleaf Slug with clutch of eggs

We did a search for “Slug Eggs” and quickly found a matching image (figure 2) on the University of Florida Featured Creatures page and it is identified as the egg cluster of Leidyula floridana, the Florida Leatherleaf Slug.  Further down the page (figures 16 and 17) the Florida Leatherleaf Slug is pictured, and it is described as being:  “native to the Caribbean (Cuba to Jamaica) and southern Florida. Formerly found only in southern and central Florida, it has since has spread to northernmost Florida, and also is found in Louisiana, Texas, and northeastern Mexico, suggesting either that the species is more widespread than previous records indicated or that it is being relocated via commerce.”

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Strange Tentacled Mountain Snail
Location: Mulu National Park, Borneo
May 18, 2014 7:16 am
On my recent climb to the Pinnacles limestone formation at the Mulu National Park, I encountered this strange grey and red snail displaying two long grey tentacles emerging from its back at an elevation of about 1000 metres above sea level. I have not seen this snail elsewhere and I see it turn up again and again in pictures from blogs of other folks who have climbed the Pinnacles – but till date, no one was able to give a positive ID.
Signature: Yours sincerely, Kok Sen Wai

Terrestrial Snail

Terrestrial Snail

Dear Kok Sen Wai,
We can’t believe we are posting two requests for very unusual Terrestrial Snails in the same day.  The markings on the shell of your Snail are very similar to this example of
Naninia obiana from Indonesia that is posted to FlickR.  We did find a matching example on FlickR that is unidentified and Eric Hunt who posted the image made this observation:  “The snail had two structures that it rapidly wiped over the shell like it was cleaning it.”  There is also an image on Laura Loves It’s Blog and another example on FlickR.  We will try contacting Susan Hewitt who frequently assists in the identification of Molluscs on our site to see if she has any ideas.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Spikey Snail
Location: Suzhou, China
May 17, 2014 4:32 pm
This snail found on a walk on Da Yang Mountain, Suzhou, China early in the morning.
I found it interesting because of the spikes clearly seen on the shell. The shell is around 3cm diameter. Hope you can provide some more information !!
Signature: Fraser

Terrestrial Snail

Terrestrial Snail

Hi Fraser,
We haven’t been able to locate any information on this spiny, terrestrial Snail, but perhaps Susan Hewitt, who frequently comments on our mollusc postings, will write in with some information.

Spiny, terrestrial Snail

Spiny, terrestrial Snail

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: slug
Location: South Africa
March 3, 2014 5:14 am
Hello.
I recently found this guy cruising around the backyard just before sunrise. I estimate the size to be 8cm long and about 4cm thick. I have never seen slugs like this before. Do you have any idea what type of slug this is?
Signature: Em

Slug

Leather Leaf Slug

Dear Em,
Slugs belong to the phyllum Mollusca and most members of the class are univalves and bivalves that live in the water, including snails, clams, oysters and mussels.  Octopi and squid are also molluscs.  Slugs are classified in the class Gastropoda.  The PHotographs of South Africa blog has some images that look similar to your slug, but lacking the stripe down the center of the body.  We are going to try to contact Susan Hewitt to see if she can provide any information.

Thank you very much for the help. I hope she knows and I get to see more – very pretty!
Em

Susan Hewitt responds:  Leather Leaf Slug
Hi Daniel and Em. This rather handsome, large land slug is a “leather leaf” slug in the family Veronicellidae — the mantle completely covers the body. However I don’t know enough to be able to tell you which genus or species it is. It may possibly be an introduced species in your area.

Thanks so much Susan! I do hope to see more around, very unusual slug. Regards.
Em

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Florida land snails
Location: Florida
January 25, 2014 2:35 pm
My sister was given two land snails to care for. She said that they were collected in Florida. That’s all I know. I want to be sure these are not pest species, and secondly, if she decides to care for them I need to know what they might eat. Thanks.
Signature: Bruce

Snail From Florida

Snail From Florida

Hi Bruce,
We can post this request this morning, but we haven’t the time to research it right now, but we will try to identify your Snails later.  We have to confess that we don’t know much about Molluscs, but we do have a reader, Susan J. Hewitt, who frequently identifies Snails for us.  Perhaps she will read the posting and provide a comment.

Snail From Florida

Snail From Florida

Another Snail from Florida

Another Snail from Florida

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Slup sp.
Location: Vancouver Island, Canada
November 11, 2013 12:46 pm
Photo of a Slug sp. taken on Vancouver Island, Canada in September 2013.
Signature: GaryT

Banana Slug

Banana Slug

Hi GaryT,
We apologize for the extremely late response, but our tiny staff finds it impossible to respond to all the mail we receive.  It is a bit slower now that most of North America is frozen, so we are going through our unanswered mail to locate some beautiful photographs to postdate to go live in mid-January while we are away from the office.  This is a Banana Slug in the genus
Ariolimax.  The common name refers to both the yellow color (often mottled with brown like an overly ripe banana) and the large size.  There are three species along the Pacific Coast, and we believe you might have Ariolimax columbianus which is picture on Encyclopedia of Life

Hi Daniel,
No problem with the delay, i was not actually expecting an answer, hoping maybe!!! Thank you very much indeed for your help, it is much appreciated. I hope you are all safe and warm, while the cold snap is happening!
Thanks again, be safe. ATB

Our WTB? offices are in Los Angeles and the weather is fine, though today it was cloudy most of the day.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination