Currently viewing the category: "Snails, Slugs and other Molluscs"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Snail eating millipede
Location: Harpers Ferry, WV
May 23, 2016 5:24 pm
I thought you guys might like the picture I took this morning of a snail eating a millipede. Enjoy!
Signature: Barb

Predatory Snail Eats Millipede

Predatory Snail Eats Millipede

Dear Barb,
There is a similar image on BugGuide, but we think yours has more attractive subjects.  We don’t know if this is a native Snail or an introduced species.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: White slug
Location: Central Maryland
May 20, 2016 7:17 pm
I found this in the middle of the street on a rainy day crawling along. Googling matches its picture with the ghost slug, but what I can find says they are only in Europe. My friends and I are having a discussion about it and hope you can help us.
Signature: Wondering

Possibly Ghost Slug

Probably NOT a Ghost Slug

Dear Wondering,
We cannot say for certain that this is or is not a white variation or an albino individual of a species that was already locally established in your area, but we are pretty certain it is NOT the Ghost Slug pictured on Wikipedia and the National Museum Wales site.  According to the National Museum Wales:  “The bizarre Ghost Slug made headlines in 2008 when described as a new species from a Cardiff garden. When the first specimens were found, very little was known about this animal.”  The site continues that to:  “ensure that your slug is a true Ghost Slug (Selenochlamys ysbryda). This can be done by looking at the mantle and the eyes. The mantle … looks like a layer of skin through which the breathing hole is often visible.  This Ghost Slug has a tiny, disc-shaped mantle at the rear end of its body. It has no eye spots on its tentacles … .  Other white or pale slug species have a large, cloak-like mantle over their “shoulders” near the front of their body. They have black eye spots at the tips of two of their tentacles.”  Your individual has both the mantle and the eyespots which indicates it is NOT a Ghost Slug.  

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Update:  February 28, 2016
Thanks to a comment from Susan Hewitt, we have updated this posting of a native Brazilian Land Snail

Subject: Snail
Location: REGUA (Reserva Ecológica de Guapiaçu) Atlantic Rainforest Rio De Janeiro, Brazil
January 17, 2016 8:36 am
During my stay as a volonteer in REGUA (Reserva Ecológica de Guapiaçu) Atlantic Rainforest Rio De Janeiro, Brazil Nov 12 – Dec 7 2011 I photographed this magnificent snal. I believe people who are fascinated of these kind of animals recognize it easily.
Signature: slit

Giant African Snail Invades Brazil

Native Brazilian Land Snail

OK Slit,
You threw us on this one.  No continent in the subject line and considering your previous six submissions, we automatically assumed you would be inquiring about a Tanzanian Snail, and we located the Giant African Land Snail on A-Z Animals where we learned:  “The giant African land snail, is the largest species of snail found on land and generally grow to around 20 cm in length. The giant African land snail is native to the forest areas of East Africa but has been introduced into Asia, the Caribbean and a number of islands in both the Pacific and the Indian oceans.”  Once we realized you encountered this Snail in Brazil, we verified the original identification on Latin American Science where the headline is:  “Giant African land snails are invading Latin America.”  On National Geographic the headline reads:  “Giant Snails, Once a Delicacy, Overrun Brazil.”  We consider this to be an Invasive Exotic species and we encourage Brazilians to eat them since National Geographic states:  “The giant African snail, originally brought to Brazil as a delicacy for gourmet restaurants, has instead become a major nuisance in the country.”

Giant African Snail Invades Brazil

Native Brazilian Land Snail

Cesar Crash provides a critical warning.
Sorry, I cannot comment again.
African snail is being considered vector of meningitis, it is believed that it is dangerous even to eat leaves where it crawled and it is recomended to use a plastic bag on hand to catch it.
http://portal.fiocruz.br/pt-br/content/meningite-transmitida-por-caramujos-com-avanco-de-casos-cientistas-alertam-para-prevencao
http://laboratoriocremasco.com.br/caramujo-africano-saiba-como-evitar-a-doenca-transmitida-pelo-molusco/
But, I don’t know, this one has a light shell, I think it may be a Megalobulimus.
I Hope it helps,
Cesar.

Thanks Cesar.  We will research Megalobulimus later.

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Acrobatic slug coitus
Location: Tigard, OR
August 28, 2014 11:00 pm
A friend of mine sent these photos to me asking for my explanation of what the heck was going on here. Pasted below is my reply. Just thought you’d enjoy the pictures, post as you like, no credits necessary. I live in the Portland, OR metro area, and these pictures were taken 8/28/2014, in case you wanted to know.
“Yes indeed, this is slug sex. Perhaps the air was just right, or you happened to be playing some Rick James just a little too loud. It looks just barely post-coital, so perhaps this scene is more accurately referred to as “slug afterglow”. Either way, those white misshapen things are the slugs genitals. Slugs have both a penis and a vagina (lucky bastards), and it looks as if the one in the foreground is hastily retracting its junk. Perhaps in order to avoid the traditional slug version of pillow talk, which involves the chewing off and consuming of each others’ penises. They grow back, but still, kinda intimate for a one-night stand, don’t you think?”
Signature: Jason

Mating Slugs

Mating Slugs

Hi Jason,
We are always amazed at images of mating Slugs, and one 2006 posting of Mating Slugs resulted in quite a bit of controversy.

Thanks for that link, I really needed a good laugh. You folks are awesome, thanks for the great work!

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Slug eggs
Location: Houston, TX
May 31, 2014 5:57 pm
Found this under a pot planter on a warm day 5-31-14 in Houston/Galveston, TX area. It appears to be a slug with its eggs. However, it doesn’t seem like a typical slug. The dorsal side is more rough while the underside is more slimy. As we messed with it, it snugged up with the eggs more. When we left it alone for a minute, the eyes came out and it began moving quite a bit.
Signature: W. Parks

Sluglike Creature Guards clutch of eggs

Leatherleaf Slug with clutch of eggs

Dear W. Parks,
Thanks for commenting on an Unknown Eggs posting from our archives and then sending your own documentation.  The creature in your image does appear to be sluglike, but we are not certain of its identity.  The clutch of eggs looks identical to that from our archives, and it is also from Texas.  We are going to feature your submission as our Bug of the Month for June 2014 even though we cannot identify it at this time.  We will attempt to research this matter.

Sluglike Creature guards clutch of eggs

Leatherleaf Slug with clutch of eggs

We did a search for “Slug Eggs” and quickly found a matching image (figure 2) on the University of Florida Featured Creatures page and it is identified as the egg cluster of Leidyula floridana, the Florida Leatherleaf Slug.  Further down the page (figures 16 and 17) the Florida Leatherleaf Slug is pictured, and it is described as being:  “native to the Caribbean (Cuba to Jamaica) and southern Florida. Formerly found only in southern and central Florida, it has since has spread to northernmost Florida, and also is found in Louisiana, Texas, and northeastern Mexico, suggesting either that the species is more widespread than previous records indicated or that it is being relocated via commerce.”

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Strange Tentacled Mountain Snail
Location: Mulu National Park, Borneo
May 18, 2014 7:16 am
On my recent climb to the Pinnacles limestone formation at the Mulu National Park, I encountered this strange grey and red snail displaying two long grey tentacles emerging from its back at an elevation of about 1000 metres above sea level. I have not seen this snail elsewhere and I see it turn up again and again in pictures from blogs of other folks who have climbed the Pinnacles – but till date, no one was able to give a positive ID.
Signature: Yours sincerely, Kok Sen Wai

Terrestrial Snail

Terrestrial Snail

Dear Kok Sen Wai,
We can’t believe we are posting two requests for very unusual Terrestrial Snails in the same day.  The markings on the shell of your Snail are very similar to this example of
Naninia obiana from Indonesia that is posted to FlickR.  We did find a matching example on FlickR that is unidentified and Eric Hunt who posted the image made this observation:  “The snail had two structures that it rapidly wiped over the shell like it was cleaning it.”  There is also an image on Laura Loves It’s Blog and another example on FlickR.  We will try contacting Susan Hewitt who frequently assists in the identification of Molluscs on our site to see if she has any ideas.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination