Currently viewing the category: "Scorpions, Whipscorpions and Vinegaroons"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Baby Scorpion
Location: Bunbury, Western Australia
March 1, 2014 6:41 pm
Dear Bugman,
We have just moved into an old house surrounded by bush in Bunbury, Western Australia. On the day of the move, our things arrived from UK, after spending 3 months in ships.
I found what looked like an ‘ant’ on our white carpets, just where our little boy was playing. When I looked closer, I saw that it had ‘claws’. It was startled and buried itself, head first in the fibres of the carpet, raising it’s ‘sting’ in a threatening way. It was too tiny to appear threatening though. I called my husband to look and he held it with a pair of tweezers. He threw it out without killing it but he thinks he might have hurt its tail.
I managed to get a picture of it. It is about 1 cms in length.
I am curious as to if this is a scorpion and if it is indigenous to Western Australia. Please shed some light. Thanks in advance.
Su,
Western Australia
Signature: Su

Scorpion

Scorpion

Hi Su,
Yes, this is a Scorpion, but beyond that, we cannot say much for certain.  You can find information on Australian Scorpions on The Museum Victoria website which states:  “The Australian species can inflict a painful sting that results in swelling and pain for several hours, and there have not been any confirmed deaths of people from stings from Australian scorpions. Medical advice should be sought if you are stung by a scorpion.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this Bug?
Location: Mt. Yaedake, Okinawa, Japan
January 30, 2014 5:33 pm
We live in Okinawa, Japan. And were out viewing cherry blossoms yesterday, Jan. 30, 2014 when we came upon this critter by some vending machines. Our internet searches have not turned up an answer as to what it is. It seems to be part spider, part crab, and part scorpion. When nudged, it lifted up it’s abdomen like a scorpion would. We took a photo, and then left it alone.
Thank you for you help.
Signature: Perplexed in Okinawa

Whipscorpion

Whipscorpion

Dear Perplexed in Okinawa,
This is a Whipscorpion, and prior to your letter, we did not realize they could be found in Japan.  We found information on the Western Austranian Museum website that there are two species in the genus
 Typopeltis that are found in Japan.  Whipscorpions are Arachnids like Spiders and Scorpion, but unlike Spiders and Scorpions, they have no venom.  The threat posture you witnessed might have been in preparation for discharging a mild acetic acid which is a defense mechanism, hence the common name Vinegaroon.  It is unclear to us why it is pictured on the Invasive Species of Japan website as indications are that it is native.  According to Encyclopedia Britannica:  “Whip scorpions are most common from India and Japan to New Guinea, although two genera occur in the New World.”

Thank you so much for your reply!  We felt we had exhausted our internet searches, but we were looking for an “Okinawa” bug and putting that in our search was obviously hindering our results.   We are so excited to have our little mystery solved.  Glad to know that they have no venom, although we did not want to get close enough to test that out.
Thanks Again!

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Scorpions in house
Location: Edenvale, South Africa
January 16, 2014 12:29 am
Hi,
I live in Edenvale South Africa and this is the 5th scorpion we found in our house. I stepped on one (I think its the same one on the photo) about two years ago and it burnt like hell but I managed to sort it out with a bit of aloe.
I found this little dude (a baby one) in my drawer this morning – would love to know more about them.
Signature: MaddyZA

Scorpion

Scorpion

Dear MaddyZA,
This is one of the most beautiful Scorpions we have ever seen.  We will attempt to identify it tomorrow.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: scorpion in South Georgia
Location: Screven, Georgia
December 29, 2013 5:53 am
hello
yesterday (December/28/2013) i found a tiny scorpion in my back yard. its maybe a little bit bigger than my pinky nail. we were building up a fire when i saw it on the ground near it. i had been picking up pieces of wood from an old pile and cutting down some brush to add into the fire. i was wondering if you could help me identify the type of scorpion, how venomous it is, and how large it gets. i was also thinking of keeping it as a pet and wonder what insects i should feed it and how often.
Signature: Edgar Flores

Hentz Striped Scorpion

Hentz Striped Scorpion

Dear Edgar,
This looks to us like the Hentz Striped Scorpion,
Centruroides hentzi, pictured on BugGuide.  According to BugGuide, this species has been found in Georgia and Florida.  It is our understanding that Scorpions with small pincers and larger tails are more venomous, but we cannot verify that.  We suggest you post your photo and questions to a forum like Arachnoboards if you want advice on keeping this little beauty in captivity.  In the meantime, you can try feeding small crickets that are available at a pet store.  It is our understanding that this species is often found under the peeling bark of downed pine trees.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What’s That Scorpion
Location: Edenvale, Gauteng, South Africa
December 9, 2013 1:00 am
Hi What’s That Bug,
I’ve got another one for you. This time a scorpion.
Would you know what kind of scorpion this is? We get quite a few of them in the house during summer. Fattish tail, thin pincers. Not especially aggressive. They come in mostly at night and walk across the floor. They sometimes make their way upstairs.
Again, not fantastic pictures; my phone’s camera doesn’t seem to behave well at night. But the color you see in the pics is pretty much the color these scorpions are.
Thanks a lot.
Signature: Warren

Scorpion

Scorpion

Hi Warren,
We do not recognize your Scorpion.  We have read as a generalization that Scorpions with small pincers depend more upon their venom, and they tend to have more poisonous stings.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this?
Location: Costa Rica
October 24, 2013 5:21 pm
Hi found it into my closet, what is that?
Signature: Diego

Cancle or Tailless Whipscorpion

Cancle or Tailless Whipscorpion

Dear Diego,
This is a Tailless Whipscorpion.  We understand that the name in Spanish is Cancle.  Though they are related to Scorpions, the Tailless Whipscorpions do not have venom and they are considered harmless.

Hello Daniel, first of all I want to apologize because I just sent a few lines with almost no information, then I saw in your web site that people made a big description about bugs, now thanks to you I know that the little bug in my closet is name Cancle, as I wrote I´m from Costa Rica (tropical and warm place) and this is the first time that I see a bug like that.
One more time thank you very much for your information, great site btw!!!

You are most welcome Diego, and there is no need to apologize.  While it is true that we like to post submissions with as many details as possible, your concise letter did include the information that you found your Tailless Whipscorpion in the closet.  They are shy creatures that often hide during the day, emerging after dark to pursue prey.  Tailless Whipscorpions help to control Cockroach populations when they are permitted to share a home with human inhabitants.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination