Currently viewing the category: "Solpugids and Camel Spiders"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Giant Spider
Location: North Scottsdale, Arizona
September 16, 2014 10:26 am
Can you tell me what this poor guy was? My neighbor found it in her garage, I wasn’t sure if it was dead or if it was poisonous, so I killed it (it was already dead.)
My friends have suggested a “Child of the Earth,” Hobo Spider or Solpugid? This was found in North Scottsdale where we’ve had record amounts of rain in the last few weeks.
What do you suggest we do if we find more, given that we’re expecting a lot more rain?
Thanks!
Signature: Becki

Solifugid

Solifugid

Dear Becki,
One of your friend’s suggestions is actually sort of correct.  Solpugid is a name that can still be found in literature, but it has fallen into disuse and has been replaced by Solifugid, a member of the order Solifugae, commonly called Sun Spider or Wind Scorpions.  Solifugids are Arachnids, but they are neither Spiders nor Scorpions, and unlike those orders of Arachnids, they do not have venom.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this?
Location: San Diego
May 16, 2014 9:26 pm
Dear BugMan,
What is this bug? He was FAST! Found him in an upstairs spare room. It’s been HOT here lately, 100+, not sure if that helps any.
Signature: Julie

Solifugid Carnage

Solifugid Carnage

Dear Julie,
Though it is an Arachnid, the class of creatures that includes venomous spiders and scorpions, this Solifugid is harmless as it does not have any venom.  That does not in any way inhibit the ability of a Solifugid to hunt prey, and they can help rid the home and yard of other undesirable creatures, including cockroaches and bed bugs.  We would encourage you to have more tolerance in the future and allow any Solifugids you encounter to live.  If found indoors, they can be trapped in an inverted glass and then taken outdoors by slipping a postcard under the glass to contain the creature inside.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Yuck! What is it?
Location: Pasadena Ca USA
May 3, 2014 12:50 am
Found three of these in my house tonight . I might have stepped on the first smaller one. Then caught two more with my hand held vacuum and cups. They are so fast and creepy! Can you please tell me what they are?
Signature: Calujan

Wind Scorpion

Wind Scorpion

Dear Calujan,
Commonly called a Wind Scorpion, this arachnid lacks venom, so it is not really considered dangerous, however, even without venom, they are adept predators that will help keep your yard free of other unwanted creatures.  Though they don’t have venom, a large specimen might deliver a painful bite if carelessly handled.  We suspect the recent heat wave in the Los Angeles area is the reason you have suddenly noticed these Wind Scorpions.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Ant mimicry?
Location: Case Grande, AZ
April 29, 2014 5:51 pm
My father’s cat was playing with a large bug yesterday night (4/28/14) that I have not been able to identify on the internet. He lives in Casa Grande, Arizona where there is a vast amount of desert. It is the tail end of Spring and currently 90 degree weather during the day and in the 60’s at night. He sent me this photo of the bug inside a medicine bottle but it isn’t all that clear. It appears to have four sets of legs which indicate that it is not an insect but likely an arachnid though not likely a scorpion since it is missing pinchers and a stinger. It also seems to have an abdomen, thorax and a head with antennae and what looks to be mandibles, which means that it is not a spider unless it is ant mimicry. As far as the whereabouts of this thing at the present time, my father dropped it off by a canal near his home because he does not like to kill things.
Signature: Erika H.

Windscorpion

Windscorpion

Hi Erika,
Despite its common name of Windscorpion, this Arachnid in the order Solifugae is considered harmless since it does not have venom.  Large specimens might deliver a painful bite if carelessly handled.  Because of your father’s kindness to the lower beasts, we are tagging this posting with the Bug Humanitarian Award.  Windscorpions are also called Sun Spiders.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Ant-like creature
Location: Costa Rica
November 24, 2013 9:15 pm
My sister had this fall on her neck while she was in bed in Costa Rica. Besides being the creepiest thing to fall on one’s neck while one is in bed, what is it?
Signature: Rob

Solifugid

Solifugid

Hi Rob,
This is a Solifugid, commonly called a Sun Spider or a Wind Scorpion.  They do not have venom and they are not considered dangerous, however, they have strong jaws and they might deliver a painful bite.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What’s this bug??
Location: North Dakota
October 10, 2013 8:42 pm
Found this in the bathroom and another today. Any idea what this is?
Thanks for the help!
Signature: does not matter

Solifugid

Solifugid

Hi does not matter,
This is a Solifugid, a member of one of the Arachnid orders, which means it is classified along with venomous spiders and scorpions, however, Solifugids do not have venom, so they are harmless to humans, though large Solifugids from the Middle East, which are commonly called Camel Spiders, might deliver a painful bite.  Solifugids are sometimes called Sun Spider or Wind Scorpions.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination