Currently viewing the category: "Solpugids and Camel Spiders"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Please help with this giant ant/spider look-a-like.
Location: San Diego, CA
November 20, 2015 7:44 pm
Hello,
I am stumped with this bug and saw it for the first time in early spring in Southern California and just and now again at the end of fall. I’ve seen smaller versions which were hairy that looked like a small tarantula mixed with an ant, which made me think it was some type of velvet ant. It moves very fast and looks similar to a pseudoscorpion. The one pictured is the largest I have seen and has two very small eyes on top of its head, and crawled out from underneath my house. Thanks in advance for any help.
Signature: Stumped

Solifugid

Solifugid

Dear Stumped,
This is a predatory Solifugid, commonly called a Sun Spider or Wind Scorpion, but unlike its Arachnid namesakes, the Solifugid lacks venom, so it is not considered dangerous to humans.  They do have strong mandibles and we would not recommend handling larger individuals which are capable of biting.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Solifugid ID
Location: Dorob National Park, Namibia
October 7, 2015 1:43 pm
Habitat: Dry riverbed in rocky gorge, near Messum crater
Weather: Dry Arid
Time: Daylight
Size: 3-5cm
Observation: It was seen moving about the rocks and sand. Once it sensed danger it burrowed itself beneath the sand.
I believe I have narrowed down this solfugid to the Hexisopodidae family. I am leaning towards Hexisopus genus over Chelypus genus based on the absence of of well-developed spines on the pedipalps but am not confident I can I can tell based on my photos.
Any help on narrowing down identification or tidbits on natural history would be much appreciated. This was such a neat find!
Signature: Michael Kent

Solifugid

Solifugid

Dear Michael,
This is the strangest looking Solifugid we have ever had submitted to us.  Its legs are so compact, it most likely does not run as quickly as other members of the order Solifugae.  Your observations that it buried itself in the sand are quite interesting, and that might be an adaptation to not being able to run quickly.  Alas, we haven’t the necessary skills to determine a more specific identity, and it sounds like your own research was quite thorough.  We will be posting all of your wonderful images and perhaps an Arachnologist will see the posting and be able to contribute a future comment.  Are there any Solifugologists out there???  As a side note, we appreciate your naming convention for the digital files.  All we had to do was add you name to the file name you provided to maintain our own naming convention.

Solifugid

Solifugid

Solifugid

Solifugid

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Very unusual
Location: Abu Dhabi United Arab Emirates
September 4, 2015 4:30 am
This insect is very odd, is it a spider?
Signature: Gavin

Solifugid

Solifugid

Hi Gavin,
Though it is common called a Sun Spider in North America and a Camel Spider in the Middle East, this Arachnid is not a true spider, but a Solifugid, a member of the order Solifugae.  Though formidable predators, they are not dangerous to humans as they do not have venom.

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What type of critter is this?
Location: South California dessert-Imperial Valley
August 21, 2015 12:27 pm
Hello from the Imperial Valley’s dessert area of southern California. Brawley CA to be exact. My name is Al and I would like to know if you can please help in identifying this critter. My 5 year old daughter found it while we were walking at the park one night. I have seen a couple of scorpions crawling here and there but I don’t believe I have ever seen this type of critter before. Your response will be appreciated. Thank you.
Signature: Al

Solifugid

Solifugid

Dear Al,
This fierce predator is a Solifugid, commonly called a Sun Spider or Wind Scorpion, but unlike its venomous Arachnid relatives, the Solifugid does not have a venomous bite or sting.  A large Solifugid might give a person a painful bite if it is carelessly handled, but despite that, it is considered harmless.

Thank you very much Mr.Marlos for responding ! And a very quick response indeed. Yes like I wrote earlier my 5 year old daughter was the one to see it first. She will be starting kinder next month and this will be one of her first lesson in the crawling critters world. I will explain to her your expert response. I have encountered a couple of scorpions in two different ocassions at this particular park this past year. I have just let them go their way. This park is near a river with fields all around. The color of these two scorpions were yellowish/tan, about 4 to 5 inches long. I did a little research but still do not know what species they are. A bark scorpion maybe? Again thank you very much for your help in identifying this critter. I have saved your link to show my son and daughter .

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this ??
Location: Escalon ca
July 23, 2015 9:31 pm
We live in Escalon California, walked into our bathroom and found this!!!
Signature: Manuel Freitas

Solifugid

Solifugid

Dear Manuel,
This is a predatory Solifugid, commonly called a Sun Spider or Wind Scorpion.  Though classified as an Arachnid along with scorpions and spiders, Solifugids lack venom, so they are not considered dangerous to humans, though large individuals are capable of biting.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Solifugid and Cicada
Location: Mayhill, NM, USA
June 20, 2015 10:52 pm
It’s been a little while since I’ve visited your site, mostly being busy with other things; however, revisited it about a week ago because I remember greatly enjoying the different pictures and descriptions. Looking through your site reminded me of this picture I nabbed a little over a year ago; I’d just gotten home from a nighttime trip to town for provisions (it’s about an hour drive away, and at the time they were seeing daytime temperatures upwards of 110F) and was checking on my plants I’ve got scattered around outside the house when I heard a strange noise; it was like a clicking and flapping that I couldn’t quite place. Seeking it out, I found these two, a Solifugid and a cicada, the one struggling to eat the other as the other tried desperately to fly away. By the time I managed to get my camera, the cicada had died and the Solifugid was happily munching away, but knowing how rare it is to see even the end result of a hunt like that, I took a picture anyway. Around here, our cicadas are tiny, rarely ever getting over an inch in length; you can somewhat make out a Ponderosa pine needle in the foreground bottom center, extending to the left of the pair, for reference.
I’m gonna go ahead and send this other picture I took about the same time; it’s another tiny Solifugid, resting on a bed of moss. That’s pretty typical moss, and all the “twigs” are actually more Ponderosa pine needles, so you can tell this guy was tiny. I love finding these guys around here; they’re really neat to watch scurry around.
Hope you enjoy the pictures!
Signature: Grady

Solifugud eats Cicada

Solifugud eats Cicada

Dear Grady,
We were out of the office for several weeks and we are just now combing through to find interesting submissions to post.  We know we will miss many because we have so many unanswered submissions, but we are selecting submissions based on subject lines and your subject line caught our attention.  Thanks for submitting this wonderful Food Chain image of a Solifugid eating a Cicada, but especially because of the detailed verbal account of your observations.

Solifugid

Solifugid

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination