Currently viewing the category: "Solpugids and Camel Spiders"
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Subject: What is this ??
Location: Escalon ca
July 23, 2015 9:31 pm
We live in Escalon California, walked into our bathroom and found this!!!
Signature: Manuel Freitas

Solifugid

Solifugid

Dear Manuel,
This is a predatory Solifugid, commonly called a Sun Spider or Wind Scorpion.  Though classified as an Arachnid along with scorpions and spiders, Solifugids lack venom, so they are not considered dangerous to humans, though large individuals are capable of biting.

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Solifugid and Cicada
Location: Mayhill, NM, USA
June 20, 2015 10:52 pm
It’s been a little while since I’ve visited your site, mostly being busy with other things; however, revisited it about a week ago because I remember greatly enjoying the different pictures and descriptions. Looking through your site reminded me of this picture I nabbed a little over a year ago; I’d just gotten home from a nighttime trip to town for provisions (it’s about an hour drive away, and at the time they were seeing daytime temperatures upwards of 110F) and was checking on my plants I’ve got scattered around outside the house when I heard a strange noise; it was like a clicking and flapping that I couldn’t quite place. Seeking it out, I found these two, a Solifugid and a cicada, the one struggling to eat the other as the other tried desperately to fly away. By the time I managed to get my camera, the cicada had died and the Solifugid was happily munching away, but knowing how rare it is to see even the end result of a hunt like that, I took a picture anyway. Around here, our cicadas are tiny, rarely ever getting over an inch in length; you can somewhat make out a Ponderosa pine needle in the foreground bottom center, extending to the left of the pair, for reference.
I’m gonna go ahead and send this other picture I took about the same time; it’s another tiny Solifugid, resting on a bed of moss. That’s pretty typical moss, and all the “twigs” are actually more Ponderosa pine needles, so you can tell this guy was tiny. I love finding these guys around here; they’re really neat to watch scurry around.
Hope you enjoy the pictures!
Signature: Grady

Solifugud eats Cicada

Solifugud eats Cicada

Dear Grady,
We were out of the office for several weeks and we are just now combing through to find interesting submissions to post.  We know we will miss many because we have so many unanswered submissions, but we are selecting submissions based on subject lines and your subject line caught our attention.  Thanks for submitting this wonderful Food Chain image of a Solifugid eating a Cicada, but especially because of the detailed verbal account of your observations.

Solifugid

Solifugid

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: whats that bug
Location: sudan
April 3, 2015 1:50 pm
i found this one at my house and i want to know what does it called.
Signature: M. hider

Solifugid

Solifugid

Dear M. hider,
This is a Solifugid, commonly called a Sun Spider or a Wind Scorpion.  Though it is an Arachnid, unlike both Spiders and Scorpions, the Solifugid does not have venom, and though its jaws are capable of a painful bite, it is not considered dangerous.  The body on your individual is longer and less streamlined than most individuals we have seen.  Species found in the Middle East grow quite large and they can run quickly, earning them the common name Camel Spider, and there is much false information about Camel Spiders on the internet.

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Subject: Unknown Spider
Location: Malawi, Africa
December 25, 2014 10:52 pm
I live in Malawi, Africa. Recently I have moved to a more rural part of the country than what I have been previously acquainted with. There are many unknown bugs to me here. Although I do not have a particular fondness of these creatures, my curiosity has got the better of me. Attached is a picture of a large spider. I believe it is typically nocturnal. It moves very fast and has dangerous fangs. The largest one I know of was three inches. The people here do not have a name for it in English, in the native tongue it is called “Chichotsa Mfumu”. Which being translated means, “The Thing That Drives the Chief From His Chair”. Like I said earlier, I am curious and would like to know if it has an English name.
Thank you for your time,
Signature: Sarah – Malawi, Africa

Solifugid:  The Thing that Drives the Chief from His Chair

Solifugid: The Thing that Drives the Chief from His Chair

Dear Sarah,
We love your exotic letter with its colorful, local vocabulary.  This Arachnid is a Solifugid in order Solifugae, and though the members are commonly called Sun Spiders or Wind Scorpions in North America, they are neither spiders nor scorpions with which they are classed in Arachnida.  In the Middle East they are called Camel Spiders and there is much internet hysteria surrounding their alleged traits.  Solifugids, including your local Things that Drive the Chief from His Chair, are formidable predators, and though they lack venom, we would not welcome a bite from a large individual.  We are featuring your submission and dubbing it our favorite end of the year posting.

Thank you for your prompt reply and for your assistance in helping me identify this creature. I am so pleased with your services I may call on them again. Thank you very much.
Sarah Sjoblom

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Subject: I found this spider 4 times
Location: Botswana, palapye
October 24, 2014 1:52 pm
I just want to know it’s dangerous or not… It moves very fast.
Signature: Don’t know

Solifugid

Solifugid

This is a Solifugid, and though they are commonly called Camel Spiders or Sun Spiders, and though they are Arachnids, they are not true spiders.  They do not have venom, but a large individual might bite a human, and they have powerful mandibles.  Solifugids are fierce predators, and we would encourage you to allow them to keep your surroundings clear of unwanted insects like Cockroaches.  As it appears the individual in your image has bee sprayed with insecticide, we are tagging this posting as Unnecessary Carnage.

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Subject: is it poisonous
Location: kingsburg, ca
October 3, 2014 6:05 pm
I get a few of these around the house, this one was hiding in a pot. Is it poisonous? What is it?
Signature: nancy

Solifugid

Solifugid

Dear Nancy,
Though this Solifugid is related to both venomous spiders and scorpions, it is a harmless creature that does not have any venom.  Solifugids are sometimes called Sun Spiders or Wind Scorpions.  Though lacking in venom, a large individual might deliver a painful bite if carelessly handled.

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination