Currently viewing the category: "Preying Mantis"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Hard cocoon on chain link fence
Location: Massachusetts
May 18, 2016 3:55 pm
Hi bug man, I spotted this cocoon on the chain link fence in our backyard. I’ve tried Googling with no luck, and I’ve become very curious about it. It’s very hard. It’s currently late spring here, in the north Eastern United States.
Signature: Jen

Mantis Ootheca

Mantis Ootheca

Dear Jen,
This is the Ootheca or Egg Case of a Preying Mantis, and you can expect several hundred hatchlings this spring.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

For Us, Donald Trump is clumsy and deadly, kind of like a Toe-Biter.  They sound stubborn too.  We can well imagine a predatory, aquatic True Bug being used by a young boy to scare a young girl.  That scenario seems somewhat Trumpian.

Close-Up of a Toe-Biter

If The Donald was a Bug:  Close-Up of a Toe-Biter

Hillary Clinton, on the other hand is much more stealth than she is clumsy, and we would not want to cross her as we imagine her wrath would be unflinching.  Hillary reminds us of a Preying Mantis.  She is deliberate and she is stronger than her mate, who can become a meal, losing his head while copulating, and never losing a beat, so that she would have the energy to raise a brood.  A Preying Mantis can turn its head to look behind it.

If Hillary was a Bug: Mantis Eats Hummer.

If Hillary was a Bug: Mantis Eats Hummer.

For Bernie Sanders, we decided to reference the “Feel the Bern” campaign slogan and we selected the Iron Cross Blister Beetle, which could cause folks to feel the burn if it is carelessly handed.  We found a great image from our archives of an Iron Cross Blister Beetle taking a dip in the swimming pool, but Bernie’s campaign is showing no evidence of cooling off as California’s primary approaches.

Iron Cross Blister Beetle: Feel the Bern

Bernie Sanders:  Cooling Off or still Feeling the Burn???

Origin of this Posting:  May 7, 2016
We thought today while working in the yard how we might anthropomorphize some bugs that remind us of the political candidates, and the first thing that came to mind today for Donald Trump, because of a comment from Roxanne we received, is a Toe-Biter.
  According to Roxanne:  “I have never been bitten. they pinch however, with their big front legs. they are also difficult to remove from clothing, as they are velcro-like. Also difficult to remove from hysterical humans, they have landed on. They are terrible flyers.. bombadiers.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Immature California Mantid
Location:  Mount Washington, Los Angeles, California
May 7, 2016
We continue to encounter young California Mantids in the garden.  This youngster was perched atop a primrose.

Immature California Mantis

Immature California Mantis

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Large Mantis posing
Location: Cape Town South Africa
April 14, 2016 6:54 am
took pictures from that nice mantis.
she was posing very nice and looked into the lense
size was r.a. 15cm so thats a huge bugger
Signature: ThunderPie

Mantis

Mantis

Dear ThunderPie,
The bright blue color on the inside of the raptorial front leg that is visible in one of your images seems like an excellent identification feature, and that supposition proved correct when we found this matching image of
 Polyspilota aeruginosa on iSpot.  According to Exotic Pets, the common name is the Madagascan Marbled Praying Mantis.  Your individual appears to be a more slender male.

Mantis

Mantis

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Mantis in Greenhouse
Location: 78634, Texas
April 6, 2016
The next cool thing I found was a praying mantis on the GH door (see attached)!
With an utter invasion of lady beetles and other critters we went from aphids everywhere to ZILCH! wuhu! Even the milkweeds are almost free!
So cool to live here :)))))
You guys rock!!!!
Sandy

Carolina Mantis

Carolina Mantis

Hi Again Sandy,
We are thrilled to post your image of a female Carolina Mantis, a native species.  We identified it thanks to this BugGuide image that depicts the black spot in the middle of the wing.  We just finished a posting regarding native versus non-native Mantids in the garden, so the sending of your newest image was perfectly timed.  We are also pleased to hear that predators are controlling the aphids in your garden and greenhouse.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: My neighbor found this on her fence.
Location: 45° 30′ 34″N 122° 30′ 28″W
April 4, 2016 10:40 am
Im trying to identify a “cacoon like” structure on my neighbors fence i currently have only a picture go by. I would say a moth cacoon off first glance but the striations throw me off a bit. Please help me in figuring if this needs to be gotten rid of or left alone.
Signature: Jeff Homsley

Mantis Ootheca

Mantis Ootheca

Dear Jeff,
This mantis ootheca will hatch several hundred beneficial predators.

Thank you sooo much…thats incredible

Update:  April 6, 2016
Though we originally responded to this request, we did not create a posting.  Since posting our own images of a California Mantis hatchling and the ootheca from which it emerged, we decided to turn this submission into a bit of a public service message for home gardeners.  It is frequently necessary to prune plants in the garden, but it is always a good idea to look closely to see if there are any beneficial critters, possibly in the form of immobile eggs or pupae, in the trimmings.  We make it a habit to toss branches into the green bin, but to leave the lid open in the event that anything needs to escape.  Just last summer, while trimming the guajes, we found two California Mantids, so we relocated them elsewhere in the garden.  We encountered more Mantids last year than any other year, and we credit that to becoming more aware while cleaning up the yard.  About a month ago, we removed a broken branch from the butterfly bush and found three California Mantis oothecae, so we tied them securely to other plants, and we have now been rewarded with a sighting of a hatchling Mantis.  The ootheca in this image looks to be a native species in the genus
Stagmomantis.  According to the 4H pdf, the California Mantis is reported from Oregon.  Though we are in favor of organic gardening, we like to caution our readers about the potential problems of purchasing commercially available Mantis oothecae from dealers as those are generally not native, and introducing non-native predators can have a negative effect on native species.  Non-native Mantids are larger and more aggressive than our native species, and we suspect our natives are being eaten by Chinese and European Mantids.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination