Currently viewing the category: "Preying Mantis"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Mantid
Location: Fortaleza, Brazil
January 28, 2016 10:12 pm
A mantid found in Fortaleza, Brazil. Found in the daytime on a wall.
Signature: Wesley Neely

Mantis

Mantis

Dear Wesley,
We tried to identify your Mantis to the species level, which we did not think would be too difficult because of the distinctive lobes at the tips of the wings, but alas, we could not find any matching images on Insetologia or on the web in our cursory search.  Perhaps Cesar Crash will have better luck with this one.

Thanks for your help! I have the same issues!

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Strange delicate bugs in my kitchen.
Location:  El Sereno, Los Angeles, California
January 29, 2016
should I just let them live in the kitchen? or try to catch them and put them outside?
Christina

Mantid Hatchling

Mantid Hatchling

Cool Christina,
This is a hatchling Preying Mantid.  It should definitely go outside.  It will stalk prey in the garden.

Mantid Hatchling

Mantid Hatchling

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: More from Arusha
Location: Usa River, Arusha, Tanzania
January 25, 2016 11:39 am
Hello again oh wonderful bug folks
Here’s another pic from USA River, Arusha, Tanzania. Great markings on this amazing beastie. No odd-shaped thumb in the pic this time sadly but it was about the length of an adult thumb. Seen mid December in our garden one morning.
Signature: The Wood Family

Spiny Flower Mantis

Spiny Flower Mantis

Dear Wood Family,
Back in 2005 we posted an image of a Preying Mantis that was identified as being in the genus
PseudocreobotraBy 2007, we learned it has the common name Spiny Flower MantisMantid Forum refers to the species as the Spiny Flower Mantis and we found the name Target Mantis in conjunction with the web search that led us to The Tree of Life.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bug
Location: Western pheriphery of Serengeti Ecosystem, Tanzania
January 14, 2016 11:36 am
Dear Bugman!
During November 2015 I spent three weeks eco-touring in N Tanzania.
The prime reason why I joined is because I compile a trip report. I also publish photos from my trips. I want all my published photos to shoe correct name of species. (www.pbase.com/stefan_lithner ) I am doing well with birds and mammals. When it comes to reptiles and insects I´m not so good. I have not tried to identify many of the larger “bugs”.
I found this page when I was looking for a scientific name for Spider(hunting) Wasps. This species I saw over the banks of suthern Lake Natron in the reat Rift Valley. I have learned there are at least 15 species of SpiderWasps. It is a long shot, but if I am (very) lucky there is only one Spider Wasp hunting over the banks at the edge of southern Lake Natron.
Please note the bug is pearched on an ipod. Photographed Nov 11.
Are you good with scorpions and turtles as well?
I here enclose
Signature: slit

Devil's Flower Mantis

Devil’s Flower Mantis

Hi Slit,
The mantis posed on the iPad is a Devil’s Flower Mantis,
Idolomantis diabolica, and it really is a distinctive looking insect.  There is an amazing image of a Devil’s Flower Mantis in threat position on PhotoNet.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Larva ? attached to a fallen twig
Location: West Los Angeles yard
January 9, 2016 6:11 pm
This is a gray, silver striped, scaley, fattish (3.3 cm by 1.1 cm), thing is tapered at both ends and is stuck fast to a twig from a Kolreuteria bipinata (Chinese golden rain) tree. The exterior is hard and doesn’t respond to light touch.
Signature: Fran Andersen

Mantis Ootheca

Mantis Ootheca

Dear Fran,
This is an ootheca or egg case of a native Preying Mantis in the genus
Stagmomantis.  Many nurseries sell mantis oothecae to appeal to ecologically conscious gardeners, however, they are generally the oothecae of non-native species that will also prey upon smaller native Mantids.

Wow, thank you.  So you guys are sometimes quicker than you warn us to expect.  I was prepared to be patient.  Now I have patience to burn.
Nice going Daniel.  You are good.
Fran

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Unknown mantis
Location: Fuerteventura
December 20, 2015 12:43 pm
At around 6pm on December 15 2015 in a coastal town called Tuineje in Fuerteventura, me and my boyfriend walked out to the end of a concrete pier to watch the sun set. On a concrete wall we found this beautiful green and white mantis. It stayed there for the half an hour we were there and its only movement was to turn its head and it occasionally began to shake for a few seconds. It seemed very out of place on a pier out in the sea and it was almost as if it was there to watch the sunset! It was probably around 10 cm and had a beautiful ornate pattern of green and white on its back. I was wondering if you could tell me what type of mantis it is as Google doesn’t seem to be able to give a specific name. Thank you very much!
Signature: Louise

Thistle Mantis

Thistle Mantis

Dear Louise,
We have identified your mantis as a Thistle Mantis or Devil’s Flower Mantis,
Blepharopsis mendica, thanks to the Wildlife and Birding Destinations site where it states “It is found in north Africa, the Canary Islands, the southern Med and the Middle East.”  You can also read about the Thistle Mantis on the Keeping Insects website where it states:  “Blepharopsis mendica is a quiet species of praying mantis. They are good at catching flying insects. Relying on its camouflage it waits patiently until an unsuspecting prey comes along. This species is not very aggressive and can be intimidate by large prey. Blepharopsis mendica can show a deimatic display in which it will raise its wings and hold its forearms in a sideways way. In this posture the mantis looks very big and the bright colors on the inside of the forearms is visible. This is meant to scare away predators.”

Thistle Mantis

Thistle Mantis

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination