Currently viewing the category: "Preying Mantis"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Indian Mantis species
Location: Gujarat, India
July 15, 2016 11:27 pm
This mantis looks like a blade of grass. Antenna are aligned straight with the body to look like a blade of dry/dead grass. What species is it? Not sure if it is Indian Stick Mantis.
Signature: Nitin Solanki

India Grass Mantis

India Grass Mantis

Dear Nitin,
In a previous posting of this species, we identified it as a Giant Stick Mantis or Indian Grass Mantis,
Schizocephala bicornis.  According to Project Noah, both common names are used.  Bug Nation has some very nice images of the species.

India Grass Mantis

India Grass Mantis

India Grass Mantis

India Grass Mantis

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Brown California Mantis nymph on Palo Verde
Location:  Mount Washington, Los Angeles, California
July 11, 2016 6:30 PM
We have been monitoring the California Mantid hatchlings in our yard after finding five oothecae on the same butterfly bush occupied by a California Mantid late last summer.  There is a forest of primrose with many 7 foot tall plants in a small patch of our yard, and we have observed at least six green California Mantid nymphs there over the past few weeks.  The California Mantid can be either green or brown, and there is some evidence that the coloration is tied to the surroundings, though one might counter that both green and brown Mantids might exist in the same location, and those that are better camouflaged avoid predators and consequently survive to pass on their genes as opposed to the notion that the Mantid will change color depending upon the surroundings.  The Palo Verde is currently blooming and its blossoms are bright yellow.  We just spotted our first brown California Mantid on the Palo Verde.  Though we acknowledge that cannibalism is most likely occurring with the larger mantids devouring the smaller ones, nonetheless, there are far more this year than we have ever seen in the past.  Thankfully we spotted those five oothecae last season while trimming dead branches.

California Mantid nymph on Palo Verde

California Mantid nymph on Palo Verde

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  California Mantids
Location:  Mount Washington, Los Angeles, California
June 24, 2016
We continue to see small California Mantids in the garden, but this growing youngster is about an inch and a half long and we moved it from the front door to the hoja santa plant.  Low light in the early evening, and shallow depth of field make for a less than acceptable image.

Immature California Mantid

Immature California Mantid

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Preying Mantis?
Location: Lorgues, South France
June 8, 2016 3:32 am
Hi,
We took this photo of a preying mantis? In south of France last week, beg of June, it was attracted to a garden light in a boules area but the garden was in Provence and surrounded by lots of scrub land. Can you identify it? It had its wings out but fluttered about it didn’t really fly.
I am including a second photo of a really pretty moth same location too! Because it’s so cool!
Signature: Many Thanks Ali and Richard

Mantis

Conehead Mantis

Dear Ali and Richard,
We just returned to the office after a short holiday, and though we opened your email over a week ago and did some preliminary research, we did not identify your Mantis species.  We will continue to research the matter, but we will be posting it as unidentified until we have more time to research.  We have over a week of identification requests to begin sorting through.  We believe this may be a Conehead Mantis in the family Empusidae based on images posted to BioDiversity Explorer where it states:  “Empusids are slender and are identified by the spines on their protibia which have alternatively one long spine and two to four shorter spines. They also have leaf-like lobes on the femora. The antennae of the males are elongate and doubly pectinate (comb-like) rather than thin and bare as usually found in the mantids. The Empusidae is made up of eight genera with a small number of species scattered across Africa, the Mediterranean region and Asia.”  According to El Mirador del Sol:  “The mantis in the photo is Empusa Pennata, common names conehead mantis in English and mantis palo in Spanish, is a species of praying mantis in genus Empusa. It can be found in Spain and parts of Portugal, France, Lebanon,Central and Southern Italy and Greece.”

Wow that’s amazing I could not find it anywhere! Thank you so much, it looks great in the professional photos I am so pleased we took the photo and followed it up.
Thank You.
Best Wishes
Ali and Richard.

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination
European Paper Wasp and California Mantidling

European Paper Wasp and California Mantidling

Subject:  Paper Wasp and California Mantid Nymph found among the primrose plants
Location:  Mount Washington, Los Angeles, California
May 30, 2016 6:30 PM
We were out working in the yard on Memorial Day and we noticed a Paper Wasp in the genus
Polistes resting on a tall primrose stalk, so we decided to take a few images to identify the species.  Well, as often happens in the garden, we got distracted and we remembered as the light was beginning to wane.  Upon returning, much to our glee, we found a young California Mantid on the same stalk.  The Mantid has more than doubled in size since we first discovered hatchlings back in early April.  We couldn’t help but to be amused that in a few more months, the Paper Wasp might have to worry about becoming a meal for the Mantid.  We are relatively certain that the wasp is a European Paper Wasp, Polistes dominula, which we identified on BugGuide.  According to BugGuide:  “An introduced species from Eurasia, often mistaken for a yellow jacket. First reported in North America by G.C. Eickwort in 1978 near Boston, Massachusetts.  There are reports of it replacing native species of wasps in some areas” which may be a problem as it has spread throughout much of North America in less than forty years, according to BugGuide.

European Paper Wasp

European Paper Wasp

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Hard cocoon on chain link fence
Location: Massachusetts
May 18, 2016 3:55 pm
Hi bug man, I spotted this cocoon on the chain link fence in our backyard. I’ve tried Googling with no luck, and I’ve become very curious about it. It’s very hard. It’s currently late spring here, in the north Eastern United States.
Signature: Jen

Mantis Ootheca

Mantis Ootheca

Dear Jen,
This is the Ootheca or Egg Case of a Preying Mantis, and you can expect several hundred hatchlings this spring.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination