Currently viewing the category: "Preying Mantis"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Crusty thing on fence
Location: Denver, Colorado
April 1, 2014 8:06 pm
We found thes crusty pupa thing on our fence. We live near Denver, Colorado. Does anyone know what it is.
Signature: Thank you for your help.

Preying Mantis Oothicae

Preying Mantis Oothicae

These are Oothicae or egg cases of Preying Mantids.  Each will release up to several hundred hatchling mantids when they are ready to emerge.

Thank you for the answer-it’s been stumping me for about 6months. I am so glad we found your web site. Keep up the awesome work.
Thanks from Denver.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: what is this green creature?
Location: New Zealand, Wairarapa
March 10, 2014 6:37 pm
Hi – that’s on/around our window for more than 2 weeks… quite big, and “social”.
It looks funny and I tried to identify what is it: it has only 4 legs and no claws, and it’s bright green.
thanks!
Signature: teodora

Mantis

New Zealand Mantis

Dear Teodora,
This is a Preying Mantis and you are mistaken on the number of legs.  You are counting the four walking legs, but not the pair of raptorial front legs that are being held tightly to the body.  The raptorial legs are the pair used to grab prey.  We cannot be certain, but we suspect this may be a native and endemic species, the New Zealand Mantis,
Orthodera novaezealandiae, which is pictured on GrahameNZ Photographix and Friends of Te Henui where the yellow antennae are visible.  Canterbury Nature has a nice profile on the New Zealand Mantis, and the distinctive purple spot on the inside of the foreleg femur is described, but unfortunately not visible in your photo.  We are relatively certain your Mantis is the New Zealand Mantis, and not the South African import, Miomantis caffra, which is likely competing with the native species, possibly threatening its survival.  According to TERRAIN:  “The Miomantis caffra  usually hides under leaves  ….  Although not considered a pest species, it is thought to be displacing the New Zealand native species (Orthodera novaezealandiae) in urban environments of northern New Zealand.”

great! thank you a lot! :-)

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Why does this insect have a tongue?
Location: Beni, Bolivia
February 19, 2014 8:57 pm
Hi bugman,
I’ve never seen another bug like this one. It was in Bolivia, in the Beni province, near the Beni River outside of the town of Rurrenabaque. I think it was April or May at the time.
Signature: Bill

Mantis

Bark Mantis

Dear Bill,
This is some species of Mantis, and we hope to be able to provide you with a more definitive identification regarding is genus or species.  We have to confess that we are not that skilled in insect anatomy, but we did a bit of research.  A general breakdown of the mouthparts of an insect can be found on Insect Identification for the Casual Observer and the tongue is not mentioned.  We are speculating that the pink organ you are referring to is either the mandible or the maxillae. Insect Identification for the Casual Observer provides the following definitions:  “Mandibles These are hard jaws meant for gripping and biting, most often found on insects like ants” and “Maxillae Secondary jaws, usually past the primary jaws for further destruction of the prey.”  According to the University of Kentucky Entomology site:  “Mantids also have chewing mouthparts.”  Since your individual does not have wings, we are guessing it is an immature specimen and it resembles this Bark Mantis in the genus
 Liturgusa that is pictured on FlickR.  Images from Honduras on American Insects supports that identification.

Bark Mantis

Bark Mantis

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Can you identify this tree borer by the egg sack?
Location: Omaha,Ne
January 27, 2014 11:06 am
Hello, I recently took a new job as a groundskeeper after many years doing landscape work. This property has a tree borer that I haven’t identified before. Can you help me identify it by the egg sack? Picture attached.
Thank you so much!
Signature: Nick

Mantis Oothica

Mantis Oothica

Hi Nick,
While we are not disputing that you may have some type of borer on the grounds, both of the images you have attached are of Oothicae or Egg Cases of Preying Mantids, and by all accounts, they are considered beneficial predators.

Mantis Oothica

Mantis Oothica

Cool! That’s actually really good to hear. I have over 50 sugar maples that look like they have been shot with buckshot. It’s nice to know Mother Nature is trying to fix the situation for me!
Thank you vey much! I appreciate your time
Nick

Hi again Nick,
Should you happen to get a photo of the Borer, we would glady give a try at identifying it for you.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: pupa?
Location: san diego ca.
December 27, 2013 10:32 am
found this on Christmas morning attached to my outdoor umbrella! I’ve looked through countless photos and can’t find it. Can you help ID it. Thanks
Signature: don’t understand queastion

California Mantis Oothica

California Mantis Oothica

The signature is the name you would like used when we post images and questions.  This is the Oothica or Egg Case of a Preying Mantis, and based on the similarity to this image from BugGuide, it is an Oothica from the native California Mantis, Stagmomantis californica.  The oothica that are sold by nurseries as organic means of controlling pest species in the garden are generally from non-native Preying Mantids that are larger and more aggressive than our native mantids.  While we applaud the good intentions of gardeners who want to use natural means for pest control, we fear that our native Mantids are being displaced and perhaps eaten by their non-native relatives.  This Oothica appears to have already hatched into approximately fifty tiny mantids.  Here is a photo from our archives of the hatching Oothica a different species of Mantis.  We also recently photographed a nymph of a California Mantis in our own Mount Washington, Los Angeles garden. 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Dead Leaf mantis
Location: Mumbai, India
December 24, 2013 10:28 pm
I would have never seen this fellow if he didnt fly right into us!!
beautiful camouflage. this was the best photo i could click, he was too active for me to focus!
Signature: Sid

Wandering Violin Mantis

Wandering Violin Mantis

Hi Sid,
The quality of your photograph is much higher than most of the images we receive.  Despite the resemblance to dead leaves, this is actually a Wandering Violin Mantis,
 Gongylus gongylodes, and based on the information we have learned on the sexual dimorphism in this species on A Gardener’s Chronicle blog, she is a female.  Males have more feathery antennae and longer wings.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination