Currently viewing the category: "Preying Mantis"
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Subject: Green Omani Mantis ?
Location: Adam, Oman
September 14, 2016 4:28 am
Hi BugMan,
What’s this beautiful creature ? Seen in the desert in Oman, just SE of Adam
Cheers,
Signature: Blewyn

Egyptian Flower Mantis

Egyptian Flower Mantis

Dear Blewyn,
An insect’s common name frequently refers to a location, perhaps where it was first discovered or perhaps because it is common there, but insects have never respected international borders or walls.  Though your sighting was in Oman, we believe this is an Egyptian Flower Mantis,
Blepharopsis mendica.  Keeping Insects calls this a Thistle Mantis and states:  “This species of praying mantis is creamy-white to beige with light green stripes and light green ‘veins’ on the wings as adults. On its back this mantis has a small pointed shield under which the forearms are being kept. The inside of the front legs are orange and blue white white spots. These colors are shown in the threatening posture to deter predators. Blepharopsis mendica will grow to a size of about 5 to 6 cm, with little difference in size between the sexes. The males are more slender with wings that reach a little bit over the end of the abdomen. The females are bulkier with a wider prothorax and with wings that extend to just the end of the abdomen. The females have thin antennae while adult males have feathered antennae (antennae with large thick ‘hairs’ on it).”  The description of the antennae indicates this is a male. iNaturalist also uses the common name Egyptian Flower Mantis and also lists Oman as being in the range of the species.

Egyptian Flower Mantis

Egyptian Flower Mantis

Shukran Jazilan ! (as the locals might say around here)

Ed. Note:  Translation of Arabic into English found at My Memory is  “thank you a lot .”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this?
Location: Dubbin, OH
August 31, 2016 1:36 pm
This bug was on my driveway basking in the sun. Appears to ha e two sets of wings? Or is it mating? The whole thing was about an inch long. Here is a pic. This was taken Today, August 31 in Dublin, OH
Signature: Lisa H

Mantis

Mantis

Dear Lisa,
This is a Preying Mantis, but we are not certain about the species.  One inch seems quite small for a North American species.  Of all the species represented on BugGuide, the closest visual match seems to be the Grizzled Mantis, but that is a Southern species not reported further north than South Carolina according to BugGuide.  This is a good BugGuide image that is similar to your own.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Mysterious Insect
Location: Georgia
August 29, 2016 10:06 pm
Hi. Came across this insect on my front porch. I have never seen anything like it! I’m hoping you can tell me what it is. Thank you!
Signature: Anna Rovolis

Grizzled Mantis

Grizzled Mantid

Dear Anna,
This little beauty is a female Grizzled Mantid, a native predator.  Also known as a Lichen Mimic Mantid, this species is very well camouflaged on tree bark, which might explain why you have never before noticed one.

Thank you for the info!!
Thanks,
Anna

Hi Anna,
Your posting has already gotten 101 Facebook “likes” on our site.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Indian Mantis species
Location: Gujarat, India
July 15, 2016 11:27 pm
This mantis looks like a blade of grass. Antenna are aligned straight with the body to look like a blade of dry/dead grass. What species is it? Not sure if it is Indian Stick Mantis.
Signature: Nitin Solanki

India Grass Mantis

India Grass Mantis

Dear Nitin,
In a previous posting of this species, we identified it as a Giant Stick Mantis or Indian Grass Mantis,
Schizocephala bicornis.  According to Project Noah, both common names are used.  Bug Nation has some very nice images of the species.

India Grass Mantis

India Grass Mantis

India Grass Mantis

India Grass Mantis

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Brown California Mantis nymph on Palo Verde
Location:  Mount Washington, Los Angeles, California
July 11, 2016 6:30 PM
We have been monitoring the California Mantid hatchlings in our yard after finding five oothecae on the same butterfly bush occupied by a California Mantid late last summer.  There is a forest of primrose with many 7 foot tall plants in a small patch of our yard, and we have observed at least six green California Mantid nymphs there over the past few weeks.  The California Mantid can be either green or brown, and there is some evidence that the coloration is tied to the surroundings, though one might counter that both green and brown Mantids might exist in the same location, and those that are better camouflaged avoid predators and consequently survive to pass on their genes as opposed to the notion that the Mantid will change color depending upon the surroundings.  The Palo Verde is currently blooming and its blossoms are bright yellow.  We just spotted our first brown California Mantid on the Palo Verde.  Though we acknowledge that cannibalism is most likely occurring with the larger mantids devouring the smaller ones, nonetheless, there are far more this year than we have ever seen in the past.  Thankfully we spotted those five oothecae last season while trimming dead branches.

California Mantid nymph on Palo Verde

California Mantid nymph on Palo Verde

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  California Mantids
Location:  Mount Washington, Los Angeles, California
June 24, 2016
We continue to see small California Mantids in the garden, but this growing youngster is about an inch and a half long and we moved it from the front door to the hoja santa plant.  Low light in the early evening, and shallow depth of field make for a less than acceptable image.

Immature California Mantid

Immature California Mantid

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination