Currently viewing the category: "Preying Mantis"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Preying Mantis
July 6, 2014 4:17 pm
A friend opened a pool side umbrella and says many, many tiny preying mantis scurried out from inside the umbrella.  Could this be possible?  Where are the eggs typically laid?  I have seen adult preying mantis in my holly bush but it is a distance from the swimming pool umbrella.  I searched “The Curious World of Bugs” but could not find any information.
Thanks,
Signature: Kris Dorka

Mantis Ootheca Hatching

Mantis Ootheca Hatching (from our archive)

Dear Kris Dorka,
Are you my Aunt?  You did not provide a location for the sighting.  Preying Mantids lay eggs in a frothy mass known as an Ootheca, and once the mass hardens, it provides insulation and other protection for the eggs it contains.  Each Ootheca can have several hundred eggs, and when it is time for the hatchlings to emerge, they erupt from the ootheca.  Mom is coming to visit in August, but we haven’t determined a date yet.  I’m looking forward to the Hungarian Wax Peppers she usually brings me.  She often sends a box or two when they are in season as well.  I’ve occasionally found them in Los Angeles, but they don’t taste the
same.
P.S.  If we are related, I will send my personal email address which gets much less mail than What’s That Bug?

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Praying Mantis eating a Cricket?
Location: East Rochester, New York
May 10, 2014 6:50 pm
Hi guys,
I saw this praying mantis eating some sort of bug and immediately thought of your site and the occasional bug on bug carnage pics that would be featured, so here you go! The second picture is some other bug at the same location that I see once in a while. It’s probably not a shield bug but is kinda close in shape. Both pictures were taken mid to late September 2013. And thank you for the great website it helped us identify the house centipedes we have and made them a little less creepy to encounter!
Signature: Veronica

Preying Mantis eats Cricket

Preying Mantis eats Cricket

Hi Veronica,
Thanks for sending us your documentation of a Preying Mantis eating a Cricket, however we want to correct one misconception in your email.  We do not consider anything to be “bug on bug carnage.”  We don’t believe the lower beasts kill one another without good reason, like for food or to defend themselves.  Rather, we have a Food Chain tag that includes images of insects or other creatures preying upon others for food, and we have an Unnecessary Carnage tag reserved for humans, who out of ignorance, kill lower beasts because of fear, misconception or just plain torture.  Your second image is an invasive, exotic Brown Marmorated Stink Bug.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Crusty thing on fence
Location: Denver, Colorado
April 1, 2014 8:06 pm
We found thes crusty pupa thing on our fence. We live near Denver, Colorado. Does anyone know what it is.
Signature: Thank you for your help.

Preying Mantis Oothecae

Preying Mantis Oothecae

These are Oothecae or egg cases of Preying Mantids.  Each will release up to several hundred hatchling mantids when they are ready to emerge.

Thank you for the answer-it’s been stumping me for about 6months. I am so glad we found your web site. Keep up the awesome work.
Thanks from Denver.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: what is this green creature?
Location: New Zealand, Wairarapa
March 10, 2014 6:37 pm
Hi – that’s on/around our window for more than 2 weeks… quite big, and “social”.
It looks funny and I tried to identify what is it: it has only 4 legs and no claws, and it’s bright green.
thanks!
Signature: teodora

Mantis

New Zealand Mantis

Dear Teodora,
This is a Preying Mantis and you are mistaken on the number of legs.  You are counting the four walking legs, but not the pair of raptorial front legs that are being held tightly to the body.  The raptorial legs are the pair used to grab prey.  We cannot be certain, but we suspect this may be a native and endemic species, the New Zealand Mantis,
Orthodera novaezealandiae, which is pictured on GrahameNZ Photographix and Friends of Te Henui where the yellow antennae are visible.  Canterbury Nature has a nice profile on the New Zealand Mantis, and the distinctive purple spot on the inside of the foreleg femur is described, but unfortunately not visible in your photo.  We are relatively certain your Mantis is the New Zealand Mantis, and not the South African import, Miomantis caffra, which is likely competing with the native species, possibly threatening its survival.  According to TERRAIN:  “The Miomantis caffra  usually hides under leaves  ….  Although not considered a pest species, it is thought to be displacing the New Zealand native species (Orthodera novaezealandiae) in urban environments of northern New Zealand.”

great! thank you a lot! :-)

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Why does this insect have a tongue?
Location: Beni, Bolivia
February 19, 2014 8:57 pm
Hi bugman,
I’ve never seen another bug like this one. It was in Bolivia, in the Beni province, near the Beni River outside of the town of Rurrenabaque. I think it was April or May at the time.
Signature: Bill

Mantis

Bark Mantis

Dear Bill,
This is some species of Mantis, and we hope to be able to provide you with a more definitive identification regarding is genus or species.  We have to confess that we are not that skilled in insect anatomy, but we did a bit of research.  A general breakdown of the mouthparts of an insect can be found on Insect Identification for the Casual Observer and the tongue is not mentioned.  We are speculating that the pink organ you are referring to is either the mandible or the maxillae. Insect Identification for the Casual Observer provides the following definitions:  “Mandibles These are hard jaws meant for gripping and biting, most often found on insects like ants” and “Maxillae Secondary jaws, usually past the primary jaws for further destruction of the prey.”  According to the University of Kentucky Entomology site:  “Mantids also have chewing mouthparts.”  Since your individual does not have wings, we are guessing it is an immature specimen and it resembles this Bark Mantis in the genus
 Liturgusa that is pictured on FlickR.  Images from Honduras on American Insects supports that identification.

Bark Mantis

Bark Mantis

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Can you identify this tree borer by the egg sack?
Location: Omaha,Ne
January 27, 2014 11:06 am
Hello, I recently took a new job as a groundskeeper after many years doing landscape work. This property has a tree borer that I haven’t identified before. Can you help me identify it by the egg sack? Picture attached.
Thank you so much!
Signature: Nick

Mantis Ootheca

Mantis Ootheca

Hi Nick,
While we are not disputing that you may have some type of borer on the grounds, both of the images you have attached are of Oothecae or Egg Cases of Preying Mantids, and by all accounts, they are considered beneficial predators.

Mantis Ootheca

Mantis Ootheca

Cool! That’s actually really good to hear. I have over 50 sugar maples that look like they have been shot with buckshot. It’s nice to know Mother Nature is trying to fix the situation for me!
Thank you vey much! I appreciate your time
Nick

Hi again Nick,
Should you happen to get a photo of the Borer, we would glady give a try at identifying it for you.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination