Currently viewing the category: "Preying Mantis"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Large Mantis posing
Location: Cape Town South Africa
April 14, 2016 6:54 am
took pictures from that nice mantis.
she was posing very nice and looked into the lense
size was r.a. 15cm so thats a huge bugger
Signature: ThunderPie

Mantis

Mantis

Dear ThunderPie,
The bright blue color on the inside of the raptorial front leg that is visible in one of your images seems like an excellent identification feature, and that supposition proved correct when we found this matching image of
 Polyspilota aeruginosa on iSpot.  According to Exotic Pets, the common name is the Madagascan Marbled Praying Mantis.  Your individual appears to be a more slender male.

Mantis

Mantis

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Mantis in Greenhouse
Location: 78634, Texas
April 6, 2016
The next cool thing I found was a praying mantis on the GH door (see attached)!
With an utter invasion of lady beetles and other critters we went from aphids everywhere to ZILCH! wuhu! Even the milkweeds are almost free!
So cool to live here :)))))
You guys rock!!!!
Sandy

Carolina Mantis

Carolina Mantis

Hi Again Sandy,
We are thrilled to post your image of a female Carolina Mantis, a native species.  We identified it thanks to this BugGuide image that depicts the black spot in the middle of the wing.  We just finished a posting regarding native versus non-native Mantids in the garden, so the sending of your newest image was perfectly timed.  We are also pleased to hear that predators are controlling the aphids in your garden and greenhouse.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: My neighbor found this on her fence.
Location: 45° 30′ 34″N 122° 30′ 28″W
April 4, 2016 10:40 am
Im trying to identify a “cacoon like” structure on my neighbors fence i currently have only a picture go by. I would say a moth cacoon off first glance but the striations throw me off a bit. Please help me in figuring if this needs to be gotten rid of or left alone.
Signature: Jeff Homsley

Mantis Ootheca

Mantis Ootheca

Dear Jeff,
This mantis ootheca will hatch several hundred beneficial predators.

Thank you sooo much…thats incredible

Update:  April 6, 2016
Though we originally responded to this request, we did not create a posting.  Since posting our own images of a California Mantis hatchling and the ootheca from which it emerged, we decided to turn this submission into a bit of a public service message for home gardeners.  It is frequently necessary to prune plants in the garden, but it is always a good idea to look closely to see if there are any beneficial critters, possibly in the form of immobile eggs or pupae, in the trimmings.  We make it a habit to toss branches into the green bin, but to leave the lid open in the event that anything needs to escape.  Just last summer, while trimming the guajes, we found two California Mantids, so we relocated them elsewhere in the garden.  We encountered more Mantids last year than any other year, and we credit that to becoming more aware while cleaning up the yard.  About a month ago, we removed a broken branch from the butterfly bush and found three California Mantis oothecae, so we tied them securely to other plants, and we have now been rewarded with a sighting of a hatchling Mantis.  The ootheca in this image looks to be a native species in the genus
Stagmomantis.  According to the 4H pdf, the California Mantis is reported from Oregon.  Though we are in favor of organic gardening, we like to caution our readers about the potential problems of purchasing commercially available Mantis oothecae from dealers as those are generally not native, and introducing non-native predators can have a negative effect on native species.  Non-native Mantids are larger and more aggressive than our native species, and we suspect our natives are being eaten by Chinese and European Mantids.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  California Mantis Ootheca hatches in Mount Washington
Location:  Mount Washington, Los Angeles, California
April 5, 2016
Last August, we created a posting for a lost photo opportunity of a California Mantis and a Figeater together on a butterfly bush that we missed when the camera malfunctioned.  A few weeks ago, a branch on the butterfly bush was broken, and when we cut it free from the plant, we noticed three California Mantis oothecae, obviously deposited by the female we observed there.  We tied two of the oothecae to a nearby palo verde and the third to a plum tree in the back yard.  While out in the yard, we inspected the oothecae, and noticed that one appeared to have hatched out its brood.  Luckily we spotted one little Mantis hatchling, a mere 1/4 inch in length, scuttling away.

California Mantis Hatchling

California Mantis Hatchling

Hatched Ootheca of a California Mantis

Hatched Ootheca of a California Mantis

Update:  April 11, 2016
We did some gardening yesterday, and though we couldn’t be bothered getting the camera, we did find two additional oothecae on the butterfly bush, and as we were pulling weeds, we found two green 1/4 inch long green mantids scuttling around the low grass.

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Mantis?
Location: Baghdad, Iraq
March 13, 2016 10:03 pm
This insect is wreaking havoc on the ant population on base! What is it?
Signature: Tami

Preying Mantis

Egyptian Flower Mantis

Dear Tami,
With its speckled wings and red antennae, this really is a pretty Egyptian Flower Mantis,
Blepharopsis mendica. 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Strange mantis-like bug
Location: Singapore
March 19, 2016 6:09 am
Hi bugman,
I’ve recently captured a strange little bug which looks like a miniature mantis but has these 2 “tails” located at the abdomen. It has a very erratic response to flashing lights and movement around it. The bug sometimes goes even goes apeshit when either of the 2 factors come in play. I’ve tried feeding it small red ants and grapes but I think it eats ants but they could’ve escaped by the small air hole I’ve poked on the plastic lid but it has been surviving for 3 days now and I’m starting to see tiny droppings so I guess the ants were its meal. It’s just a little over 2cm in length and I’d say a rough estimate of half a cm in across. The camouflage is stone coloured with black brownish splatters. I’d really like to know the name and characteristics of this interesting little bugger as I really like to keep it as a pet!
Cheers
Zuohan
Signature: WZH

Mantis

Mantis

Dear Zuohan,
We cannot imagine that this is anything but a Mantis, though we cannot locate a similar looking image online.  The front legs on your individual do not have the typical appearance of the raptorial front legs characteristic of most Mantids, enabling them to grasp prey.  Perhaps it is just the camera angles.  We will continue to attempt to identify your Mantis to at least the genus level.

Mantis

Mantis

Hi Daniel,
thanks for the reply and your attention towards this particular matter, I know that it isn’t mantis but at first glance it looks to me as it was a mantis-like creature. Particularly due to it’s forelegs tucking in like a mantis (I don’t have much knowledge on mantises though I have seen one up close, and this struck me on first sight as one). It has been 5 days now and it’s still going strong, I’m pretty sure its surviving off the red ants I keep dropping into the air hole. I’ve observed that it sits waits for its prey to cross it instead of going for the hunt. When the red ants come across it, the creature just grasps the ant, places it in its mandibles and sort of throws it aside, but as I’m typing this, I’ve observed it has just devoured one red ant (I’m pretty sure it has as I saw it swoop it’s head downwards and the mandibles are executing a chewing motion) I can provide you guys more and maybe higher quality photos of it upon request, I maybe sending some better ones your way later during the day.
Also, I found out the two ‘tails’ are actually the ovipositor (whatever that means) and whilst typing this again I caught some “winged ants” and the creature finds them particularly edible and devours one within seconds of it crossing its path unlike the red ants which it is very picky.
Anyways hope this helps in your data matching
Cheers
Zuohan

Mantis

Mantis

We look forward to receiving additional images.  Please try to get details of the forelegs.

Update:  March 21, 2016
Hi Daniel,
please find attached to this email are photos of the bug, I’ve tried getting the best shot out of my crappy iphone 6 camera and these were the best ones I’ve chosen to send to you.
there are 4 previews of the bug together with 13 other photos attached
Cheers
Zuohan

Mantis

Mantis

Thanks for the new images Zuohan.  The front legs look more clearly raptorial in your new images.  This is a very small Mantis, but we still do not have a species for you.

Mantis

Mantis

Update:  March 22, 2016
Hi Daniel,
Oh so it really is a mantis? Wow what a petite one it is! Well the mantis recently just gave up and died (Heart breaks) about an hour ago, I can maybe send it to you guys for further analysis on it. I live in Singapore and I can cover the cost of shipping to you guys if you allow it. I’ll source for a small capsule of sorts and add silica gel to preserve it. I don’t the proper way to preserve a dead so maybe you can offer me some guidance.
Cheers
Zuohan

Thanks for the offer.  You should consider donating the dead Mantid to your local natural history museum for identification.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination