Currently viewing the category: "Preying Mantis"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Hammer head insect
Location: Cyprus
October 10, 2016 2:08 am
Can you please identify this bug?
Signature: Pete Hussey

Preying Mantis

Preying Mantis

Dear Pete,
The simple answer to your question is that this is a Mantis, and she is a female.  We thought it might be easy to identify her to the species level, but we have our doubts.  She is NOT
Sphodromantis viridis, a species pictured on the Biodiversity of Cyprus site, because she lacks the characteristic white spot on her wings.  Three species of Mantis are pictured on the Cyprus Insects and Reptiles site, but the only species that looks close is the Mediterranean Mantis,  Iris oratoria.  Your individual has mottled wings, unlike the images of the Mediterranean Mantis we located on BugGuide (because it was introduced to North America) or on ZipCodeZoo.  A very similar looking Mantis is pictured on the Yorkshire Field Herping and Wildlife Photography site in a 2014 Cyprus posting, but it is identified only as “Mantis Spp.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Two Male California Mantids at the WTB? office
Location:  Mount Washington, Los Angeles, California
October 8, 2016 10:37 AM
We found so many immature California Mantids in our primrose patch this spring and summer after we found several oothecae while pruning last year, so we are thrilled to have gotten a visit from two adult winged males this morning.  This is not the first time they have been attracted to the porch light. Hopefully there are some female California Mantids lurking, well camouflaged, in our garden.

Male California Mantid (shot through window)

Male California Mantid (shot through window)

Male California Mantid

Male California Mantid

The other male California Mantid

The other male California Mantid

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Interesting Structure on Tree Trunk
Location: Shipton Reserve, New Zealand
October 2, 2016 2:13 pm
I found this interesting looking structure attached to a tree trunk. Would you be able to identify it for me?
Signature: Thanks

Mantis Ootheca

Mantis Ootheca

This is the ootheca or egg case of a Preying Mantis.  We located similar looking images on Friends of Te Henui and on T.E.R:R.A.I.N where it the species is identified as Orthodera novaezealandiae and the following information is posted:  “They lay eggs in foamy egg case called an ootheca. The ootheca has a woody appearance and has straight uniformed sides. They are usually attached to a leaf, stem, wall or fence. The young hatch out as small versions of the adult.”  

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Green Omani Mantis ?
Location: Adam, Oman
September 14, 2016 4:28 am
Hi BugMan,
What’s this beautiful creature ? Seen in the desert in Oman, just SE of Adam
Cheers,
Signature: Blewyn

Egyptian Flower Mantis

Egyptian Flower Mantis

Dear Blewyn,
An insect’s common name frequently refers to a location, perhaps where it was first discovered or perhaps because it is common there, but insects have never respected international borders or walls.  Though your sighting was in Oman, we believe this is an Egyptian Flower Mantis,
Blepharopsis mendica.  Keeping Insects calls this a Thistle Mantis and states:  “This species of praying mantis is creamy-white to beige with light green stripes and light green ‘veins’ on the wings as adults. On its back this mantis has a small pointed shield under which the forearms are being kept. The inside of the front legs are orange and blue white white spots. These colors are shown in the threatening posture to deter predators. Blepharopsis mendica will grow to a size of about 5 to 6 cm, with little difference in size between the sexes. The males are more slender with wings that reach a little bit over the end of the abdomen. The females are bulkier with a wider prothorax and with wings that extend to just the end of the abdomen. The females have thin antennae while adult males have feathered antennae (antennae with large thick ‘hairs’ on it).”  The description of the antennae indicates this is a male. iNaturalist also uses the common name Egyptian Flower Mantis and also lists Oman as being in the range of the species.

Egyptian Flower Mantis

Egyptian Flower Mantis

Shukran Jazilan ! (as the locals might say around here)

Ed. Note:  Translation of Arabic into English found at My Memory is  “thank you a lot .”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this?
Location: Dubbin, OH
August 31, 2016 1:36 pm
This bug was on my driveway basking in the sun. Appears to ha e two sets of wings? Or is it mating? The whole thing was about an inch long. Here is a pic. This was taken Today, August 31 in Dublin, OH
Signature: Lisa H

Mantis

Mantis

Dear Lisa,
This is a Preying Mantis, but we are not certain about the species.  One inch seems quite small for a North American species.  Of all the species represented on BugGuide, the closest visual match seems to be the Grizzled Mantis, but that is a Southern species not reported further north than South Carolina according to BugGuide.  This is a good BugGuide image that is similar to your own.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Mysterious Insect
Location: Georgia
August 29, 2016 10:06 pm
Hi. Came across this insect on my front porch. I have never seen anything like it! I’m hoping you can tell me what it is. Thank you!
Signature: Anna Rovolis

Grizzled Mantis

Grizzled Mantid

Dear Anna,
This little beauty is a female Grizzled Mantid, a native predator.  Also known as a Lichen Mimic Mantid, this species is very well camouflaged on tree bark, which might explain why you have never before noticed one.

Thank you for the info!!
Thanks,
Anna

Hi Anna,
Your posting has already gotten 101 Facebook “likes” on our site.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination